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NINITY-SEVENTH 
ANNUAL REPORT 



OF MARYLAND 



Maryland Roorr 

iJsiiveJiliy of Mafylap.d L... 
College Park. M^. 



00 FOT GISSOLii'E 



Digitized 


by the Internet Archive 






i 


in 2013 







http ://arch i ve . org/detai Is/repo rtOO mary_88 



STATE OF MARYLAND 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
♦ 

NINETY -SEVENTH ANNUAL 
REPORT 

Of The 

State Board of Education 

SHOWING CONDITION 
Of The 

Public Schools of Maryland 

For The 
Year Ending June 30, 1963 




BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



^^-^ MARYLAND DIRECTORY OF SCHOOL OFFICIALS 

October, 1962 
MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Name Address Term Expires 

Jerome Framptom, Jr., President Federalsburg 1964 

Mrs, Kenneth S. Cole, Vice President Chevy Chase 1969 

Mrs. J. Wilmer Cronin Aberdeen 1966 

C. William Hetzer Williamsport 1968 

Dwight O. W. Holmes Baltimore 1965 

Richard Schifter Bethesda 1963 

William L. Wilson Cumberland 1967 

Thomas G. PuUen, Jr., Secretary-Treasurer 

MARYLAND STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

STATE OFFICE BUILDING 

301 West Preston Street, Baltimore I 

Name Office 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr State Superintendent of Schools 

David W. Zimmerman Deputy State Superintendent 

W. Theodore Boston Assistant State Superintendent in Certification 

and Accreditation 

Paul D. Cooper Assistant State Superintendent in 

Administration and Finance 

Robert C. Thompson Assistant State Superintendent in 

Vocational Rehabilitation 

Wesley N. Dorn Director of Research and Development 

Paul E. HufFmgton Director of Instruction 

James L. Reid Director of Vocational Education 

Nettie B. Taylor Director of Library Extension 

E. Drusilla Chairs Administrative Assistant I 

Dorothea E. Young Stenographer-Secretary 

Rosetta D. Dorsey Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Anne M. Ryland Senior Stenographer 

Walter Blackwell Chauffeur II 



Division of Instruction — Paul E. Huffington, Director 

Mrs. Grace A. Dorsey Assistant Director and Supervisor 

of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Geneva E. Flickinger Supervisor of Adult Education 

Richard K. McKay Supervisor of Civil Defense Adult Education 

George M. Crawford Supervisor of Curriculum 

Mrs. Gladys T. Hopkins Supervisor of Curriculum 

Mrs. Mildred L. Sowers Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Thomas W. Pyles Supervisor of High Schools 

Lewin A. Wheat Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs Genevieve S. Blew * Supervisor of Instruction 

Herbert R. Steiner Supervisor of Physical Education 

Sarah L. Leiter Supervisor of Pupil Services 

Percy V. Williams Supervisor of Pupil Services 

George E. Klinkhamer Supervisor of Special Education 

Elliott E. Lapin Supervisor of Special Education 

Andrew W. Mason Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Rozelle J. Miller ** Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Beverly J. Wozniak Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Beverly B. Armiger Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Marlene R. Barber Senior Stenographer 

Marilyn Buckner Senior Stenographer 

Mildred M. Faulstich Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Janet L. Harrison Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Rena B. Levitz Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Rosalind C. Lohrfinck Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Bessie S. Price Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Oma K. McClung Senior Typist 

* Part time 
** On leave for graduate study 1962-63 



2 



State Curriculum Center 



400 Cathedral Street, Baltimore I 

Name Office 

Eleanor K. Hocker Counselor II 

Mrs. Margaret J. Smith Library Assistant 

Division of Library Extension — Nettie B. Taylor, Director 

Kenneth F. Duchac Supervisor of Public Libraries 

Mae I. Graham Supervisor of School Libraries 

Doris L. Anderson Stenographer-Secretary 

Martha J. Keydash Senior Stenographer 

Division of Vocational Education — James L. Reid, Director 

Harry M. McDonald Supervisor of Agriculture 

Evelyn F. Miller Supervisor of Home Economics 

Dwight P. Jacobus Supervisor of Educational Services to Industry 

Warren G. Smeltzer Supervisor of Industrial Arts 

Glenn W. Lewis Executive Secretary, Maryland Future Farmers 

of America and New Farmers of America, 
Easton High School, Easton 

Mrs. Mary N. Stultz Executive Secretary, Future Homemakers of America 

and New Homemakers of America 
Board of Education, Frederick 

Elizabeth McGinnity Stenographer-Secretary 

Alice Algie Senior Stenographer 

Sandra R. Bush Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Octavia D. Hastings Senior Stenographer 

Florence M. Brady Junior Clerk 

Division of Certification and Accreditation 

W. Theodore Boston, Assistant State Superintendent 

Harold D. Reese Assistant Director and Supervisor of 

Teacher and Higher Education 

M. Eleanor Rice Supervisor of Certification 

Helen L. Widmyer Supervisor of Accreditation 

John L. Carnochan, Jr Supervisor of Teacher Recruitment 

Carroll L. Speck Assistant Supervisor of Certification 

Ruth E. Hobbs Assistant Supervisor of Equivalence Examinations 

Charles C. Conlon Assistant Supervisor of Trade Schools 

Elsie F. Forman Counselor II 

Helen Ellis Stenographer-Secretary 

Anne Nusinov Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Katherine Jay Bedford Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Bessie R. Gale Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Evelyn R. McClurkin Senior Stenographer 

Carole B. Webster Senior Stenographer 

Leah C. Dittmar Senior Clerk 

Mrs. Gertrude A. Gorrell Senior Clerk 

Geraldine L. Henry Senior Clerk 

Mrs. Marie F. Schumann Senior Clerk 

Mrs. Hanna Z. Streett Senior Clerk 

Division of Administration and Finance 

Paul D. Cooper, Assistant State Superintendent 

Howard E. Bosley Supervisor in College Administration and Development 

John W. Powder, Jr Supervisor of Finance 

Eleanor G. Weagly Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

George A. Myers Supervisor of School Plant Planning 

Morris W. Rannels Supervisor of Transportation 

Charles V. Akeley Assistant Supervisor of Finance 

Bernard G. Geyer Assistant Supervisor of Finance 

Walter F. Edwards Assistant Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Helen D. George Editor 

Casimer P. Kotowski Auditor II 

Margaret E. Albaugh Administrative Assistant II 

Mrs. Mary C. Hoover Accountant II 

Catherine L. Flahavan Principal Account Clerk I 



3 



DIVISION OF ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE — (Oantinued) 

Name Office 

Mrs. Laura M. Gaither Principal Account Clerk I 

Mrs. Betty Lou Krieger Principal Account Clerk I 

Mrs. Dorothy M. Norris Principal Account Clerk I 

Mrs. Mary B. Prince Principal Account Clerk I 

Phyllis E. Rodgers Principal Account Clerk I 

Mrs. Ruth S. Friedland Stenographer-Secretary 

Carrye Hamburger Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Dolores B. Jones Senior Stenographer 

Patricia M. Kaiss Senior Stenographer 

Lenore Klein* Senior Stenographer 

Bessie I. Rones Senior Stenographer 

Helen D. Wysocki Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Agnes V. Bayne Report Typist 

Mrs. Clara P. Haffner Senior Typist 

Lloyd E. Holmes Office Appliance Operator I 

Division of Research and Development — Wesley N. Dorn, Director 

R. Christine Hogan Supervisor of Research 

Mrs. Anne K. Carroll Assistant Supervisor of Research 

Robert M. Bassford Systems Analyst 

Mrs. Mary H. Binebrink Research Assistant II 

Mrs. Genevieve J. Nekervis Research Assistant II 

Mrs. Virginia K. Goldsmith Statistical Assistant 

Lillian O. Erpenstein Senior Stenographer 

Lenore Klein* Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Anastasia T, Lutz Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Susan T. Brownfield Senior Clerk 

Mrs. Doris A. Lombardi Senior Key Punch Operator 

Mrs. Thelma L. Baron Key Punch Operator 

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation 

Robert C. Thompson, Assistant State Superintendent 

W. Bird Terwilliger Assistant Director 

Lionel Burgess Supervisor of Case Services 

Raymond H. Simmons Supervisor of Field Services 

George W. Keller Assistant Supervisor of Services for the Blind 

Francis J. Borges, M.D.** Medical Adviser 

Charlotte A. Sylvester Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Florence B. Ackerman Principal Stenographer 

Alice F. O'Connor Principal Stenographer 

Mrs. Mary R. Lacher Senior Stenographer 



Metropolitan Baltimore Office 

2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore I 

Thomas D. Braun Supervisor 

J. Leo Delaney Assistant Supervisor 

Ernest C. Allnutt, Jr Counselor II 

Myrtle E. Chell Counselor II 

Mrs. Elizabeth C. Clifford Counselor II 

Mrs. Elizabeth B. Cochran , Counselor II 

James G. Dashiell Counselor II 

J. Bruce Edemy Counselor II 

Niles R. Ellingson Counselor II 

James M. Griffin Counselor II 

Martha R. Harrison Counselor II 

Harold B. Hayes Counselor II 

Irwin D. Medinger Counselor II 

William B. Melville Counselor II 

Frank H. Nachman Counselor II 

Charles L. Reis Counselor II 

Ruth F. Ring Counselor II 

Kathleen E. Scheve Counselor II 

Frank M. Skarupa Counselor II 

James D. Smyth Counselor II 

M. Eugene Spurrier Counselor II 

Lawrence E. Williams Counselor II 

* Half time 

** Part time 



4 



METROPOLITAN BALTIMORE OFFICE— (Continued) 



Name Office 

Emma E. Lueckert Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Mabel C. Dwyer Senior Stenographer 

M. Eleanor Farnandis Senior Stenographer 

Rhona R. Fox Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Frances S. Goodwin Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Melvina A. Jackson Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. N. Helen Maslanka Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Eleanor M. Mosner Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Lillian R. Pferdeort Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Vivien L. Sener Senior Stenographer 

Bell M. Sklar Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Jean C. Losasso Senior Clerk 



Eastern Shore District 

700 East Main Street, Salisbury 

Jack R. Nichols Assistant Supervisor in Charge 

Robert M. Davis Counselor II 

William T. Phoebus, Jr Counselor II 

1 — Joseph E. Guschke Counselor II 

2 — Frank A. Tarbutton Counselor II 

1 — Mrs. Ruth K. Lunsford (half-time) Senior Stenographer 

2 — Mrs. Dorothy H. Slagle Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Anne E. Bishop Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Mary Lee Harris Senior Stenographer 

1 — Stevens Building, 29 Goldsboro Street, Easton 

2— County Building, 400 High Street, Chestertown 



Southern Maryland District 

4300 Hamilton Street, Hyattsville 

Merl D. Myers Assistant Supervisor in Charge 

Leslie B. Cole Counselor II 

Harry F. Fauber Counselor II 

Charles J. Kilczewski Counselor II 

1 — Fedon G. Nides Counselor II 

1 — Myron V. Wotring Counselor II 

2 — Stanley Scher Counselor II 

3 — Leif Kvalen Counselor II 

3— W. Carroll Walsh Counselor II 

3 — F. dePaul Whitehurst Counselor II 

1 — Mrs. Jeannette M. Dart Senior Stenographer 

3 — Betty Carrol Jones Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Mary V. Bauer Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Joan B. C. Clark Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Elizabeth M. Cruz Senior Stenographer 

1 — Speer Building, 3 Church Circle, Annapolis 

2 — Court House, La Plata 

3 — 114 Commerce Lane, Room G-110, Rockville 



Western Maryland District 

74 West Washington Street, Hagerstown 

H. Dorsey Devlin Assistant Supervisor in Charge 

Edw^ard J. Shuck Counselor II 

Andrew J. Ungvarsky Counselor II 

1 — John M. Cobun Counselor II 

2 — Stanley Hamilton, Jr Counselor II 

2 — Kenneth L. Kuester Counselor II 

3— William C. Hill Counselor II 

1 — Mrs. Betty J. Lovenstein (half-time) Senior Stenographer 

2 — Mrs. Eleanor B. Gorsuch Senior Stenographer 

3— Mrs. Elizabeth K. Baker Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Alfreda E. Coffman Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Annie G. McCarty Senior Stenographer 

1— P. O. Box 504, 111 Union Street, Cumberland 

2— P. O. Box 121, Box 12, City Hall, Westminster 

3 — Board of Education, 115 East Church Street, Frederick 



5 



Disability Determinations Program 



(Old Age and Survivors' Insurance) 

10 East Fayette Street, Baltimore 2 

Name Office 

Robert L. Burton Assistant Supervisor in Charge 

Lawrence E. Brown Counselor I 

Anne M. Daly Counselor I 

Jane R. Dummer Counselor I 

Minnie Gerber Counselor I 

Roger D. Griest Counselor I 

James L. Keelan Counselor I 

Mrs. Marilyn D. Sellman Counselor I 

Ernest L. Walston, Jr Counselor I 

Hilary T. O'Herlihy, M.D.* Medical Adviser 

Anderson M. Renick, M.D.* Medical Adviser 

S. J. Venable, M.D.* Medical Adviser 

Ralph Weber, M.D.* Medical Adviser 

Elizabeth B. DePolo Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Julia A. Fanning Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Gladys M. Matthews .Senior Stenographer 

Mary C. Teves Senior Stenographer 

Betty Lee Block Senior Typist 

Anita Haman Senior Typist 

Joan G. Piekarski Senior Typist 

Judith A. Zarmzla Senior Typist 



MARYLAND STATE TEACHERS' ASSOCIATION 

Executive Board and Office Staff 

344 North Charles Street, Baltimore I 

Mrs. Mary T. Johnson, President Bohemia Manor High School, Chesapeake City 

Robert A. Gibson, First Vice President Superintendent of Schools, Cecil County 

John G. Freudenberger, Second Vice President Ellicott City Junior High School, 

Ellicott City 

Joseph T. Barlow, Treasurer Principal, Loch Raven Junior High School, Baltimore Co. 

Harrj' R. Poole, NEA State Director Washington Jr. High School, Hagerstown 

Margaret E. Adams, Member-at-Large, 1962-64 Mt. Royal Elementary School, 

Baltimore City 

Ralph L. Angel, Member-at-Large, 1961-63 Principal, Buck Lodge Junior High School, 

Prince George's County 

Paul D. Cooper, Member-at-Large, 1961-63 Assistant Superintendent of Schools, 

State Department of Education 

R. Kenneth Twentey, Member-at-Large, 1962-64 Principal, Sligo Junior High School, 

Montgomery County 

Milson C. Raver Executive Secretary and Editor 

Robert Y. Dubel Associate Executive Secretary 

H. Orville Berwick Director of Field Service 

John H. Downs Associate in Field Service and Legislation 

Morris C. Jones Associate in Field Service 

Mrs. Dorothy D. Lloyd Managing Editor 

Mrs. Clara McD. Simering Office Manager 

Carole Boehmer Clerk -Typist 

Mrs. Eleanor A. Bounds Receptionist 

Mrs. Ada A. Dubel Director of Records 

Beverley Goodman Secretary 

Mrs. Rosalie McDonnell Secretary 

Mrs. Mary Lou Malone Bookkeeper-Secretary 

Mrs. Melissa B. Marcin Division Secretary 

Mrs. Ruth Suljak Clerk-Typist 



MARYLAND TEACHERS' RETIREMENT SYSTEM 

Board of Trustees and Office Staff 
Stat.e Office Building 
301 West Preston Street, Baltimore I 

Hooper S. Miles, Chairman of the Board State Treasurer 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., Vice Chairman of the Board State Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Mary S. Ellis, Member of the Board Supervisor of Instruction, 

Board of Education of Wicomico County 

Louis L. Goldstein, Member of the Board State Comptroller 

* Part time 

6 



MARYIiAND TEACHERS' RETIREMENT SYSTEM— (Continued) 



Name Office 

B. Melvin Cole, Member of the Board Director of Elementary Education, 

Baltimore County 

Christ G. Christis Director 

Edgar T. Pfaff Accountant I 

Lewis L. Tigiior Investment Administrator 

Stanley Katzen Accountant II 

Mildred Potash Accounting Staff 

Ida Rosenberg Accounting Staff 

Ruth Connell Principal Account Clerk I 

Eva Shagogue Senior Stenographer 

Elizabeth Ann LaFond Investment Staff 

Mary Lou Druery Investment Staff 

Mrs. Mildred Scott Senior Account Clerk 

Mrs. Edna Doyle Accounting Machine Operator 

Mrs. Anna M. Novak Accounting Machine Operator 

Mrs. Anne Trhlik Graphotype Operator 

Janice Sappington Senior Clerk 

E. Leah Akers Senior Typist 



STATE-AIDED PUBLIC LIBRARIES IN MARYLAND 

County Library Librarian 

Allegany Allegany County Library Mary G. Walsh 

Anne Arundel.. . .Annapolis and Anne Arundel County Library, 

Annapolis Esther King 

Baltimore City... Enoch Pratt Free Library Edv/in Castagna, Director 

Baltimore Baltimore County Library, Towson Richard Minnich 

Calvert Calvert County Library Stella Loeffler 

Caroline .Denton Public Library William Rairigh 

Carroll Carroll County Public Library, Westminster. ... Rudolph Aubinger 

Cecil Cecil County Library, Elkton Mrs. Dorothy W. Jefferson 

Charles Charles County Library, La Plata Stella Loeffler 

Dorchester Dorchester County Public Library, Cambridge. . Mrs. Ethel L. Bruya 

Frederick C. Burr Artz Library, Frederick Josephine Etchison 

Garrett Huth Enlow Library of Garrett County, Oakland . Edith Brock 

Harford Harford County Library, Bel Air Roenna Fahrney 

Howard Howard County Library, EUicott City Mrs. Lenna Burgess 

Kent Chestertown Public Library William Rairigh 

Montgomery JMontgomery County Department of Public 

Libraries, Gaithersburg George B. Moreland 

Prince George's. . .Pi'ince George's County Memorial Library, 

Hyattsville Elizabeth B. Hage 

Queen Anne's.... Queen Anne's County Library, Centreville Mrs. Mary M. Hoopes 

St. Mary's St. Mary's County Slemorial Library, 

Leonardtown Stella Loeffler 

Talbot Talbot County Free Library, Easton Mrs. Elizabeth H. Baker 

Washington Washington County Free Library, Hagerstown .. Edward B. Hall 

Wicomico Wicomico County Free Library, Salisbury Mrs. Lucile Horsley 

Worcester Worcester County Library Mrs. Dorothy G. Moore 

PRESIDENTS OF STATE TEACHERS COLLEGES 

Earle T. Hawkins Towson William E. Henry Bovrie 

R. Bowen Hardesty Frostburg Parlett L. Moore. . .Coppin, Baltimore-17 

Wilbur Devilbiss Salisbury 



ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPERVISORY STAFF 

ALLEGANY COUNTY 
108 Washington Street, Cumberland 



Name Office 

Ralph R. Webster Superintendent of Schools 

Richard T. Rizer Assistant Superintendent and Supervisor of High Schools 

Jack A. Retry Supervisor of High Schools 

Margaret E. Doak Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Elizabeth I. Flake Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mildred E. Willison Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Robert E. Pence Supervisor of Physical Education 

LaVern J. Hahn Supervisor of Music Education 

Theodore P. Foote Supervisor of Art Education 

Ruth C. McColly Supervisor of Home Economics Education 

Julius D. Lonnholm Supervisor of Vocational, Industrial, and Adult Education 



7 



ALLEGANY COUNTY— (Continued) 



Name Office 

J. Hubert RadcliflFe Superviso? of Transportation 

Joseph T. Downey Supervisor of Maintenance 

Gladys Miller Eaton Supervisor of Cafeterias 

Homer S. Higgins Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Glen U. Hanna Visiting Teacher 

Esther M. Carter Visiting Teacher 

Eugene J. Hopkins Visiting Teacher 

Elizabeth Dixon Pitcher Financial Secretary and Office Manager 

Helen Burnett Dickerhoof Secretary to the Superintendent 



ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY 

Green Street, Annapolis 

David S. Jenkins Superintendent of Schools 

R. Harold McCann Assistant Superintendent — Administration 

Ruth V. Dudderar Assistant Superintendent — Elementary Schools 

Fred L. Alexander Director of Planning 

Frank C. Gunderloy Director of School Facilities 

Richard R. Clopper Director of Senior High Schools 

Robert S. Shaffner Director of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Eva M. Pumphrey Director of Curriculum 

Grady L. Ballard Director of Personnel and Research 

Mrs. Eleanor B. Waring Director of Special Services for Children 

Katharine Kibler Supervisor of Publications 

Ernest H. Herklotz Supervisor of Purchasing 

Mrs. Madolyn R. Leonard Supervisor of Cafeterias 

Dennis W. Turner Supervisor of Maintenance 

Frank G. Baker, Jr Supervisor of Transportation 

Leviah Daniel Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

Robert Doenges Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Winifred Fowler Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

Sarah V. Jones Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

Carl Mauro Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Virginia D. Moore Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Ruby G. Myers Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

Everett Pettigrew Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Evelyn P. Reed Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

H. Elizabeth Slater Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

Alfred Bisset, Jr Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Elizabeth B. CarroU Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Wayne M. Cornwell Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

James W. Dunagan Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Katherine K. Frantum Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Douglas S. King Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Edward Konick Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Norma Mezick Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Betty J. Mitchell Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Dorothy Noble Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Roland Olson Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Joshua M. Potter Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Mary Rossworm Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Glorius Shenton Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Doris Clements Supervisor of Home Economics 

Richard D. Carlson Supervisor of Industrial Arts 

Margaret A. Adams Supervisor of Music 

William J. Callaghan Supervisor of Physical Education 

Mary E. Wellham Supervisor of Art 

Annabelle Ferguson , Supervisor of Guidance 

Mrs. Nancy C. Walker Supervisor of Libraries 

Mrs. Thelma Sparks Supervisor of Mathematics 

H. Allan Foutty Supervisor of Science 

Albert Van Metre Supervisor of Adult and Summer Education 

Mary E. Moss Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Nancy Zastrow Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Mary Schanberger Supervisor of Special Education 

Marne L. Groff* Chief Psychologist 

Mrs. Lorelle Machen Psychologist 

John Malcolm Psychologist 

George Meissler Psychologist 

Dorothy Moskowitz Psychologist 

Lawrence P. Bonari Assistant Supervisor — Transportation 

Henry G. Weaver Assistant Supervisor — Custodial Services 

Howard C. Rinehart Assistant Supervisor— Custodial Services 

Jack Ewald Assistant in Finance 

Jack Hogsten Assistant in Personnel 

Mrs. Mary C. Brown Visiting Teacher 

* Part time 



8 



ANNE AEUNDEL COUNTY— (Continued) 



Name Office 

Bari-y Carter Visiting Teacher 

Alice Gilbert Visiting Teacher 

Esther Hamilton Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Elaine Huggins Visiting Teacher 

B. Lewis Langdon Visiting Teacher 

Jay Orr Visiting Teacher 

Joseph Parlett Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Annie S. Witheridge Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Alice Torovsky Secretary to the Superintendent 

Mrs. Elizabeth Strohl Secretary of Certification 



BALTIMORE CITY 

3 East Twenty-fifth Street, Baltimore 18 

George B. Brain Superintendent of Schools 

Edwin Stein Deputy Superintendent 

Mary A. Adams Assistant Superintendent, Elementary Education 

Houston R. Jackson Assistant Superintendent, Pupil Personnel and Staff Services 

John W. Lewis Assistant Superintendent, Business Management 

Robert C. Lloyd Coordinator, Citizens School Advisory Committee Project 

Walter A. Maccubbin, 

Assistant Superintendent, Staff Personnel and General Administrative Services 

Vernon S. Vavrina Assistant Superintendent, Secondary, Vocational, Adult Education 

Vacancy Administrative Assistant, General Administration 

Edward H. Goldstein Special Assistant, General Administration 

Richard L. Micherdzinski Director of Art Education 

M. Thomas Goedeke Director of Business Management 

Robert H. Nicholson Director of Cafeterias 

Edith V. Walker Director of Elementary Education 

Edward A. Gersuk Area Director of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Pearl W. Goetz Area Director of Elementary Education 

Helen Hermon Area Director of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Marion C. Johnson Area Director of Elementary Education 

Mrs. E. Romaine Jones Area Director of Elementary Education 

Beatrice Rawlings Area Director of Elementary Education 

Elmon L. Vernier Director of Physical Education 

M. Bernice Wiese Director of Library Services 

Vacancy Director of Music Education 

Angela M. Broening Director of Bureau of Publications 

Albert C. Packard Director of Educational Testing Service 

Herbert J. Stern Director of Guidance and Placement Services 

Ambrose J. Chlada Director of School Facilities 

Arthur Lichtenstein Director of Special Services for Pupils 

H. Spilman Burns Director of Business Services 

Orlando F. Furno Director of Research 

Sidney N. Chernak Director of Secondary Schools 

William J. Hucksoll Director of Vocational Education 

Wilmer V. Bell Director of Adult Education 

Harrie M. Selznick Director of Special Education 

Sylvester O'Grince Director of School Buildings and Grounds 



Art Education 

Richard L. Micherdzinski Director 

Mrs. Helga Hermann Supervisor of Art, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Lillian B. Reid Supervisor of Art, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Pauline D. Smith Supervisor of Art, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Elizabeth Walton Supervisor of Art, Elementary Education 

George F. Horn Supervisor of Art, Secondary Education 

Mrs. Virginia Timmons Supervisor of Art, Secondary Education 



Business Management 



John W. I;ewis Assistant Superintendent 

M. Thomas Goedeke Director of School Business Management 

Cafeterias 

Robert H. Nicholson Director 

Mrs. Eloise Payne Supervisor of Cafeterias 

Elizabeth C. Bonthron Supervisor of Cafeterias 

Mrs. Ethel Heubeck Regional Cafeteria Manager 

Evelyn Richardson Regional Cafeterial Manager 

Mrs. May Richardson Regional Cafeteria Manager 

John E. Wall Supervisor of Cafeteria Facilities 

Maurice L. Reilly Business Manager, Cafeterias 



9 



BALTIMORE CITY— (Continued) 

Business Services — Procurement 

Name Office 

H. Spilman Burns Director 

Dwight S. Caskey Supervisor of Educational Equipment 

Frederick W, Kaufman Supervisor of Educational Equipment 

Irvin R. Brose Supervisor of Educational Supplies 

Carl H. Seth Supervisor of Educational Supplies 

Wallace C. Kirk Supervisor of Educational Supplies and Equipment 

Business Services — Accounting and Distribution 

O. Eugene Albright Supervisor of School Accounting 

Office Services 

Gustav A. Brandt Senior Administrative Officer, Office Services 

Transportation 

Jack F. Bocher Supervisor of Transportation 

Maintenance and Operation 

Sylvester O'Grince Director of School Buildings and Grounds 

Kazmer Grabarkiewicz Supervisor of Operation and Custodial Training 

Albert W. Clark Supervisor of School Building Operations 

William T. Dorsey Supervisor of School Custodians 

Ernest Gambrill Supervisor of School Building Operations 

Albert F. Hartka Supervisor of School Building Operations 

Elmer P. Jennings Supervisor of School Building Operations 

Louis Kopera Supervisor of School Building Operations 

John P. Lochwich Supervisor of School Building Operations 

Edw^ard A. Paris Supervisor of School Building Operations 

Walter C. Sushko Supervisor of School Grounds Maintenance 

Sampson D. Ruffin Supervisor of Building Operations 

Joseph D. Scalon Supervisor of Building Operations 

Peter J. Schaechtel Supervisor of Operating Engineers 

Repair Shop 

Milton B. Malan Supervisor of School Repair Shop 

Elementary Education 

Mary A, Adams Assistant Superintendent 

Edith V. Walker Director of Elementary Education 

Edward Gersuk Area Director of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Pearl W. Goetz Area Director of Elementary Education 

Helen Hermon Area Director of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Marion C. Johnson Area Director of Elementary Education 

Mrs. E. Romaine Jones Area Director of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Beatrice Rawlings Area Director of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Catherine Brunner Coordinator, Early Admissions Project 

Mildred B. Blackwell Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Mary E. Bowman Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Earl Britt Supervisor of Elementary Education 

George P. Bush Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Anna Cella ...Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Charles C. Connor Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Edith Corcoran Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. May G. Cornish Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Ethel Cox Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Audrey J. Davies Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Dolores J. Deardorff Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Lenore Dickman Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Dorothy Diehl Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Cleo A. Diggs Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Jean Eifret Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Margaret Freudenberger Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Kathryn Frisby Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Violet Garren Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Betty Getz Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Doris L. Hammond Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Louisa Harston Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Gertrude Harwood Supervisor of Elementary Education 



10 



BALTIMORE CITY— (Continued) 

Name Office 

Mrs. Mary B. James Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Ida Johnson Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Evelyn Josephson Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Evelyn Karas Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Ruth King Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mary A. Metz Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Carolyn E. Motschiedler Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Helen A. Nitkoski Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Elaine Nolan Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Peggy C. Nottingham Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Robert F. Palumbi Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Thelma Peregoy Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Alice Pinderhughes Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. LaVerna W. Reed Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Louise Robinson Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Daniel Rochowiak Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Lillian H. Ross Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Marie B. Schmuck Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Gwendolyn Seaborne Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Jean S. Taylor Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Louise Tildon Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Florence M. Udel Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Mary Veloso Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Doris H. Wallace Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Rosalie Wells Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Anita E. Woodlon Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mi-s. Helena E. Wright Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Sara K. Yudlson Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Instructional Materials 

Clay W. Stall Supervisor of Instructional Materials 



Library Division 



Bernice M. Weise Director 

Harold S. Hanson Supervisor of Library Services 

Lillie G. Patterson Supervisor of Library Services 

Mrs. Alice Rusk Supervisor of Library Services 

Music Education 

Vacancy Director 

Coz-win H. Taylor Supervisor of Instrumental Music Education 

Mrs. Alice S. Beer Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

Mrs. Margaret A. Binns Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

Mrs. Jane Parker Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

Constance E. Pawelek Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

Don Regier Supervisor of Secondary School Vocal Music 

Personnel Division 

Walter A. Maccubbin, 

Assistant Superintendent, Staff Personnel and General Administrative Services 

Vacancy Director 

William C. McClean Supervisor of Pei-sonnel 

Walter A. Miller Specialist in Personnel 

Edith Pruss Specialist in Personnel 

Ruth Richards Specialist in Personnel 

Louis A. Sedlak Specialist in Personnel 

Physical Education Division 

Elmon L. Vernier Director 

Harry M. Bruce Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

Ruth C. Cinsky Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

F. Evelyn Douglass Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

Dorothy V. Horine Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

Eloise Thomas Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

Leo G. Woods Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

Julian Dyke Supervisor of Secondary Physical Education 

Mary Elizabeth McCoy Supervisor of Secondary Physical Education 



11 



BALTIMORE CITY— (Continued) 



Publications Bureau 

Name Office 

Angela M. Broening Director 

Mrs. Helen Hammond Specialist 



Pupil Personnel Services 

Educational Testing 



Albert G. Packard Dii'ector 

Dean W. Forbes Specialist in Educational Testing 

Neil R. Lovelace Specialist in Educational Testing 

M. Adele Mitzel Specialist in Educational Testing 

Mary Jane Shapiro Specialist in Educational Testing 



Guidance and Placement 



Herbert J. Stern Director 

Vacancy Supervisor of Guidance and Placement 

Vacancy Supervisor of Guidance and Placement Service 

Vacancy Supervisor of Guidance and Placement Service 

David L. Fisher Assistant in Educational & Occupational Information 

Lillian Buckingham Head, Placement Service, Guidance Division 



Special Services 



Arthur Lichtenstein Director 

Elizabeth Armstrong Supervisor of School Social Workers 

Paul Yaffe Supervisor of Psychological Services 

Charles Cephas Specialist in School Social Work 

Mrs. Marjorie Everinghim Specialist in School Social Work 

Maxwell J. Frankford Specialist in School Social Work 

Nelva Hobbs Specialist in School Social Work 

Dollie R. Walker Specialist in School Social Work 

Mrs. Eva A. Weisman Specialist in School Social Work 

Mrs. Helen C. Starr Head, Department of Home Visitor Services 



Radio and Television 

Mrs. Eleanora B. Kane Supervisor of Radio and TV Education 

Research Bureau 

Orlando F. Furno Director 

Clara E. Grether Supervisor of Research 

Harry C. Hendrickson Specialist in Research 

Michael E. Karas Specialist in Research 

Chester L. Kiser Specialist in Research 

Martin H. Raila Specialist in Research 

Safety Education 

Frank Bennett Supervisor of Safety Education 



School Facilities 

Ambrose J. Chlada Director 

Herschel H. Newlin Administrative Supervisor of School Facilities 



Secondary, Vocational, and Adult Education 



Vernon S. Vavrina Assistant Superintendent 

Sidney N. Chernak Director 

Alexina C. Stidham Administrative Assistant 

English 

Dorothy M. Kell Supervisor of English, Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Josie G. Smith Supervisor of English, Secondary Schools 

L. Earl Wellemeyer Supervisor of English, Secondary Schools 

Leonard Woolf Supervisor of English, Secondary Schools 

Foreign Languages 

Thomas D. Troy Supervisor of Foreign Languages, Secondary Schools 



12 



BALTIMORE CITY — (Continued) 

Geography 

Name Office 
Edward Biller, Jr Supervisor of Geography, Secondary Schools 

History 

Zelda B. Brenner Supervisor of History, Secondary Schools 

Frank Fairbank Supervisor of History, Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Edythe D. Myers Supervisor of History, Secondary Schools 

Mathematics 

William J. Gerardi Supervisor of Mathematics, Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Eunice B. Schmied Supervisor of Mathematics, Secondary Schools 

S. Leroy Taylor Supervisor of Mathematics, Secondary Schools 

Science 

Elra M. Palmer Supervisor of Science, Secondary Schools 

Sidney Blum Supervisor of Science, Secondary Schools 

Robert Buxbaum Supervisor of Science, Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Dorothy H. Fader Supervisor of Science, Secondary Schools 

Vocational Edjication 

William J. Hucksoll Director 

E. Duncan Hyde Supervisor of Business Education 

Forest L. Lawton Supervisor of Distributive Education 

Mrs. Nellie B. Nicholson Supervisor of Home Economics 

Suella Harrington Supervisor of Home Economics 

Stanley J. Pawelek Supervisor of Industrial Arts 

Carl J. White Supervisor of Industrial Arts 

James O. Proctor Supervisor of Vocational Education 

Frank E. Ensminger Supervisor of Vocational-Industrial Education 

Vernon H. Byus Coordinator, Manpower Redevelopment Training Program 



Adult Education 

Wilmer V. Bell Director 

George R. Uchuck Supervisor of Adult Education 

Stoyan M. Menton Supervisor of Community Adult Education 

William McK. Rawlings Supervisor of General Adult Education 

Vacancy Supervisor of Parent Education 



Special Education 



Harrie M. Selznick Director 

Lavinia W. Keagle Special Assistant, Special Education 

Mrs. Lois T. Murray Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Elsie Bevens Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Esther Davis Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Sadie Douglass Supervisor of Special Education 

Morton Esterson Supervisor of Special Education 

Helen Knox Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Lillian Maith Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Florence Owings Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Koma Stinchcomb Supervisor of Special Education in Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Elsie Warrell Supervisor of Special Education 

Louise Young Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Barbara Levine Head, Department of Speech Correction 

Mrs. Margaret H. West Secretary to the Superintendent 



BALTIMORE COUNTY 
Aigburth Manor, Towson 4 



William S. Sartorius Superintendent of Schools 

Quentin L. Earhart Assistant Superintendent in Instruction 

Joshua R. Wheeler Assistant Superintendent in Administration 

William T. Willis, Jr Assistant Superintendent in Finance 

Morris R. Baker Engineer in Charge of Construction, Operation and Maintenance 

B. Melvin Cole Director of Elementary Education 

Norris A. King Director of Secondary Education 

G. Alfred Helwig Director of Curriculum 

Walter M. Snyder Director of Personnel 



13 



BALTIMORE COUNTY— (Continued) 

Name Office 

Loyal W. Joos Director of Educational Research and Planning 

Charles M. DeWitt Director of Pupil Services 

Leon E. Grant Director of Purchasing 

Walter M. Gordon Director of Transportation 

Jerome Davis Director of Special Education 

Preston L. Grimm Director of Capital Improvement Planning 

Thomas M. Greene Director of Adult Education 

William A. Marshall Assistant Engineer in Charge of Construction, 

Operation and Maintenance 

Josiah A. Blacklock Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Shirley V. Conner Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

M. Katherine Dost Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Clotilde C. Drechsler Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Gene M. Hastings Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Pauline J. Hobbs Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Hilda Kestner Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Eleanor B. Requard Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Anna G. Shepperd Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Robert W. Gifford Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Margie B. Handy Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Samuel D. Herman Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Stella H. Johnston Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Mary S. Saterlie Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Stanley A. Smith Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Louella H. Woodward Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Vincent C. Brant Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Mary R. Childs Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Michael D. Eder Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Helen E. Hale Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Joseph B. Hillyard Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Jean R. Moser Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Carey K. Sentz Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Jean C. Sisk Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Olive T. Jobes Supervisor of Art 

Ethel M. Troyer Supervisor of Art 

Thomas R. Lawrence Supervisor of Music 

Nicholas Geriak Supervisor of Music 

John W. Craft Supervisor of Music 

James L. Miller Supervisor of Physical Education 

Harold S. Martin Supervisor of Physical Education 

Mildred H. Murray Supervisor of Physical Education 

Paul P. Plevyak Supervisor of Business Education 

Clarence F. Leisinger Supervisor of Adult Education 

Arthur A. Dick Supervisor of Vocational Education and Industrial Arts 

William A. OdeU Supervisor of Industrial Arts 

Mary E. Kelleher Supervisor of Home Economics 

Ruth S. Killian Supervisor of Home Economics 

Elizabeth D. Hodges Supervisor of Library Services 

Gloria L. Engnoth Supervisor of Special Education 

Betty C. Reed Supervisor of Special Education 

Edna T. Warwick Supervisor of Special Education 

Gilbert B. Schiffman Supervisor of Reading 

Margaret S. Farlow Supervisor of Certification 

Charles L. Leiman Supervisor of Clinical Services 

Anna R. Meeks Supervisor of Guidance 

Emma E. Williams Supervisor of Guidance 

William E. Kline Supervisor of Testing 

Louise W. Erlbeck Supervisor of Secondary Nursing Services 

Ruthetta L. Gilgash Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

E. Lyle Root Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Adele D. Woronka Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Willard Strack Specialist in Audio-Visual Education 

D. Deane Wyatt Specialist in Educational Information 

Helen Huttenhauer Specialist in Publications 

Lorena F. Simon Specialist in Library Services 

Herman C. Burton Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mildred E. Jones Supervisor of Visiting Teachers 

David H. Black Visiting Teacher 

Richard B. Blaine Visiting Teacher 

Amon Burgee, III Visiting Teacher 

Edna S. Congdon Visiting Teacher 

Bowyer E. Forsythe Visiting Teacher 

Robert 1. Geckle Visiting Teacher 

Wanda S. Greene Visiting Teacher 

Therma Lee Harris Visiting Teacher 

John J. Hart Visiting Teacher 

Mary E. Huber Visiting Teacher 

Marie J. Hunycutt Visiting Teacher 

Thomas J. Jordon Visiting Teacher 



14 



BALTIMOBE COUNTY— (Continued) 



Name Office 

Irma R. Kell Visiting Teacher 

Eliza S. McDaniel Visiting Teacher 

Vivian S. Mcintosh Visiting Teacher 

Evelyn Maus Visiting Teacher 

Frances N. Osgood Visiting Teacher 

Angelo J. Quaranta Visiting Teacher 

Louis S. Sagi Visiting Teacher 

Helen-Louise Scarborough Visiting Teacher 

Elizabeth Z. Steiner Visiting Teacher 

Mary J. Stoll Visiting Teacher 

Kathryn B. Stonesifer Visiting Teacher 

Mary A. Van Wigeeren Visiting Teacher 

Mary G. Wheeler Visiting Teacher 

Delores S. Young Visiting Teacher 

John M. Arthur Psychiatric Consultant 

Olga D. Cooper Psychologist 

Arthur M. Green Psychologist 

Jordan Lawrence Psychologist 

Marion H. Pelton Psychologist 

Sheldon K. Riggs Psychologist 

Roger E. Saunders Psychologist 

Ruth L. Sherman Psychologist 

Sheldon L. Shubert Psychologist 

Dorothy Windham Psychologist 

Evelyn C. Norton Administrative Assistant to the Superintendent 

A. Price Ransone Assistant in Planning 

Robert C. Coleman, Jr Assistant in Personnel 

Joe Leckrone Assistant in Personnel 

Allen M. Sutton Assistant in Personnel 

Karl V. Sloop Assistant in Audio-Visual Education 

John Day Assistant in Educational Information 

Mary A. Dugan Assistant in Educational Research and Planning 

William C. Feader Supervisor of Accounting 

C. Barry Carpenter Assistant in Accounting 

E. Brian Fleming Assistant in Accounting 

Charles E. Jockel Assistant in Purchasing 

Thomas W. J. Wilhelm Assistant in Purchasing 

G. LeRoy Black Assistant in Transportation 

Fred C. Donovan Assistant in Transportation 

Thomas C. Dunnock Assistant in Transportation 

Grason Fowble Assistant in Transportation 

Karl F. Swem Assistant in Transportation 

Herd S. Eburg Supervisor of Plant Operations and Maintenance 

Henry F. Schleisner Director of Grounds 

Thomas S. Boviryer Supervisor of Grounds Maintenance 

Mrs. Elaine B. Isennock Secretary to the Superintendent 



CALVERT COUNTY 

Dares Beach Road, Prince Frederick 

Maurice A. Dunkle 

Douglas M. Bivens, Jr... 
Mrs. Thelma M. Cornish 
Mrs. Mildred G. Finlon.. 

Mrs. Lola M. Parks 

Lloyd J. Falk 

William J. Middleton. . . , 
Mrs. Virginia D. Parran 
E. Anne Yoe 



Superintendent of Schools 

Director of Instruction 

Supervisor of Elementary Schools 
.Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Supervisor of Maintenance 

Supervisor of Transportation 

Chief Bookkeeper 

Secretary to Superintendent 



CAROLINE COTJNTY 

Law Building, Denton 

Wilbur S. Hoopengardner Superintendent of Schools 

Fred G. Usilton Director of Instruction 

Louise C. Dennison Supervisor of Instruction 

Lewis W. Davis Supervisor of Instruction 

Frederick H. Sheeley Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Richard W. Hall Supervisor of Plant Operations 

George H. Caple Supervisor of Transportation 

Bertha L. Miller Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Virginia M. York Secretary-Bookkeeper 

Mrs. Barbara J. Bacsak Secretary to Superintendent 

Elizabeth Ann Thawley Secretary 

Mrs. Naomi H. Tribbitt Secretary 



15 



CARROLL COUNTY 



County Office Building, Westminster 

Name Office 

Samuel M. Jenness Superintendent of Schools 

John F. Wooden, Jr Director of Instruction, Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Margaret M. Bailer Supervisor of High Schools 

Robert S. Martin, Jr Supervisor of High Schools 

Evan F. Bowers Supervisor of High and Elementary Schools 

Ruth E. DeVore ....Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Charles E. Reck Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mae Prince* Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Charles I. Ecker Supervisor of Transportation 

Mrs. Josephine D. West Supervisor of Home Economics and Cafeterias 

Philip S. Royer** Supervisor of Music 

Maye E. Grimes Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Dolores J. Snyder Visiting Teacher 

Joseph L. Shilling Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Elaine G. Alper Speech Therapist 

Roland F. Haifley Assistant in Custodial Service, School Lunch and Maintenance 

Maurice V. Wolfe Assistant in General Maintenance and Utilities 

Mrs. Martha S. Gilbert Office Manager, Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Pauline D. Peterson Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Nadine F. Saylor Assistant Financial Secretary 

Curvin M. Seitz Clerk 

Mrs. Treasa B. Gross Receptionist and Stenographer 

Mrs. Beverly R. Bosley Stenographer, Supervisors' Office 

Carole J. Bolland Stenographer, Supervisors' Office 

Helen M. Swithers Stenographer, Pupil Personnel Department 



CECIL COUNTY 

308 Court House, Elkton 

Robert A. Gibson Superintendent of Schools 

Walter J. Finn Administrative Assistant to the Superintendent 

Richard L. Holler Director of Instruction and Curriculum 

William C. Graham Supervisor of High Schools 

Robert W. Gaddis Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Evelyn P. Kay Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Norman J. Moore Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Rachel E. Boyd Supervisor of Home Economics 

Louis P. Wright Supervisor of Industrial Education and Director of Purchasing 

James M. Renn Supervisor of Maintenance 

Samuel Dixon Supervisor of Transportation and Driver Education 

Mrs. Grace B. duBose** Supervisor of Music 

Edw^in H. Barnes Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Mary A. Crouse Visiting Teacher 

Robert E. Jaccard Visiting Teacher 

Willard W. Taylor Director of Finance 

George Matthews Assistant in Finance 

Mrs. Ro.se R. Scheck Reading Specialist 

Mrs. Mary Woessner Speech Therapist 

Mrs. Ruth Craig Audiometrist 

Leslie L. Pippin Building Inspector 

Dorothy J. Moore Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Adrienne L. Boyd Secretary 

Mrs. Ruth M. Diem Secretary 

Mrs. Marie L. Bruner Secretary 

Mrs. Norma S. George , Secretary 

Mrs. Frances O. Bolton Secretary 

Mrs. Donna N. Short Clerk for School Lunch Program 



CHARLES COUNTY 

Court House, Charles Street, La Plata 

C. Paul Barnhart Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Genevieve S. Brown Supervisor of High Schools 

John W. Manspeaker Supervisor of High Schools 

Edward C. Turner Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Mary B. Neal Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Christine E. Pearson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Cecelia G. Farrall Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Georgia B. Lucas ....Visiting Teacher 

Margaret A. Posey Supervisor of School Lunch Program and Purchasing 

* Part time. Also serves as teacher in Robert Moton Sr.-Jr. High School. 
** Part time. 



16 



CHAKLES COUNTY— (Continued) 



Name Office 

Warren H. Deyermond Supervisor of Transportation 

Mrs. Julia C. Totten Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Peggy G. Bowling Clerk 

Mrs. Marianne M. Canter Clerk 

Mrs. Hazel J. Carey Clerk 

Mrs. Mary Jane Frere Clerk 

Mrs. Wilma Grogan Clerk 

Mrs. Geraldine Lawton Clerk 

Mrs. Ann B. Thompson Clerk 

Mrs. Evelyn C. Brown Speech Therapist 

Mrs. Virginia T. Lowe Speech Therapist 

Mrs. Nancy Martens* Speech Therapist 

DORCHESTER COUNTY 

205 High Street, Cambridge 

James G. Busick Superintendent of Schools 

Charles F. Hurley Supervisor of High Schools 

Thomas A. Flowers Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Evelyn E. Johnson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Viola J. Comegys Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

John T. Comer, Jr Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

John Armstrong Supervisor of Transportation 

John A. Marshall, Jr Bookkeeper 

Mrs. Mary W. LeCompte Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Dorothy S. Stephens Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Jean S. Morris Stenographer 



FREDERICK COUNTY 

1 1 5 East Church Street, Frederick 

James A. Sensenbaugh Superintendent of Schools 

Fred .J. Brown, Jr Assistant Superintendent for Instruction 

Herman A. Hauver Director of Pupil Services 

Allen R. Gaddis, III Director of Business Administration 

Duval W. Sweadner* Director of Adult Education 

Glenn E. Warneking Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Evelyn F. S. Davis Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Louise F. Thompson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Alice M. Love Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Warren R. Evans Supervisor of Physical Education 

Mary Jane Stokes Helping Teacher 

Janice Wickless Helping Teacher 

James L. Fisher Supervisor of Music 

Richard E. Summers Supervisor of Art 

Alice L. Robinson Supervisor of Library Service 

Mrs. Mary N. Stultz* Supervisor of Home Economics 

Mrs. Virginia D. Klos Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Paul L. Hoff master Supervisor of Transportation 

Paul E. Fogle Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Joseph E. Rexroad Home Visitor 

Mary M. Fiery Home Visitor 

Albert J. Bursteln School Psychologist 

Tolbert F. Lawyer Supervisor of School Facilities 

H. D. Williams Assistant in Plant Operations 

William J. E. Null Assistant in Plant Maintenance 

John E. Tritt Assistant in Administration (Accounting) 

Mrs. Pauline J. Bowlus Secretary to Superintendent 



GARRETT COUNTY 
40 South Fourth Street, Oakland 

Willard L. Hawkins 

Albert R. Ringer 

Mrs. Caroline Wilson 

Edwin W. Elias 

A. B. Dean 

O. T. Graser 

Robert R. Martin 

Mrs. Margaret S. McComas 
Mrs. Lucille T. Ludvigsen.. 
* Part time 



Superintendent of Schools 

Supervisor of High Schools 

Supervisor of Elementary Schools 
Supervisor of Elementary Schools 
....Supervisor of Pupil Pei-sonnel 

Supervisor of Maintenance 

Supervisor of Transportation 

Financial Secretary 

Secretary to Superintendent 



17 



HARFORD COUNTY 



45 East Gordon Street, Bel Air 

Name Office 

Charles W. Willis Superintendent of Schools 

Alfonso A. Roberty Assistant Superintendent 

Howard B. Peters Director of Instruction 

C. Clark Jones Director of Personnel 

George B. Prettyman, Sr Director of Public Relations 

Violet A. Davis Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Hazel L. Fisher Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Helen M. Fisher Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Jane M. Gent Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Richard J. Williams Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Alden H. Halsey Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Dorothy M. Rowe Supervisor of High Schools 

Thomas L. Smith Supervisor of High Schools 

Annetta G. Wright Supervisor of High Schools 

John R. Walker Supervisor of Industrial Education 

W. Warren Sprouse Supervisor of Music 

Earle B. Wagner Supervisor of Outdoor Education 

James H. Clow, Jr Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Howard R. Cheek Supervisor of Transportation 

Charles C. McCullough Visiting Teacher 

Joseph F. Snee Visiting Teacher 

John H. Willis, Jr Visiting Teacher 

George N. Bollinger Administrative Assistant 

William P. Byers Administrative Assistant 

Edward J. Plevj'ak Administrative Assistant 

Ralph H. Morgan Building Engineer 

Mrs. Alice W. Crowl Financial Secretary 

Ann Ij. Campbell Secretary to Superintendent 



HOWARD COUNTY 

7 Park Avenue, Ellicott City- 
John E. Yingling Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Mary R. Ho vet Director of Instruction and Supervisor of High Schools 

Frank B. Durigg Supervisor of High Schools 

Wilhelmina E. Oldfield Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mary R. White Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Harry T. Murphy Supervisor of Transportation 

Gilbert E. Miller Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Olive G. Mumford Supervisor of Library Services 

Mrs. Joan H. Weatherholtz Supervisor of Home Economics and School Lunch Program 

Walter D. Phelan Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Irene M. Johnson Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Sara S. Snapp Secretary to Superintendent 

KENT COUNTY 

400 High Street, Chestertown 

Reade W. Corr Superintendent of Schools 

Robert J. Johnson Supervisor of Transportation and High Schools 

Carey E. Lacey Supervisor of High Schools 

Lonise Hepbron Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Sara B. Chambers* Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Madeleine F. Fennell Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Lorraine U. Merrick Supervisor of Testing and Guidance 

Mrs. Clara M. Chaires Chief Bookkeeper and Clerk 

Mrs. Florence C. Ward Secretary to Superintendent 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY 

850 North Washington Street, Rockville 

C. Taylor Whittier . .Superintendent of Schools 

Homer O. Elseroad Deputy Superintendent of Schools 

John A. Permenter Assistant Superintendent for Administration 

James C. Craig Assistant Superintendent for Instructional and Personnel Services 

Stanley J. McFarland, Jr Administrative Assistant to Superintendent 

Donald E. Deyo Dean, Montgomery Junior College 

James C. Falcon Budget Supervisor 

Joseph R. Manno Methods and Procedures Analyst 

* Part time. Also vice-principal at Garnett Elementary School 



18 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY— (Continued) 



Name Office 

Mrs. Man' G. Walters Assistant Secretary to the Board 

Thomas R. Peters Assistant for Programs and Reports 

Melvin E. EngeJhardt Editor 

Mrs. Dorothy B. Waleski Assistant for Information and Publications 

Ma.xwell E. Biirdette Director, Research 

Samuel M. Goodman Assistant Director, Research 

Walter P. Bowman Assistant Supervisor, Research 

Mrs. Louise S. Walker Supervisor, Educational TV Study 

James R. Ward Supervisor, Field Services 

James D. Morgan Supervisor, Testing 

Mrs. Helen P. Bready Area Director 

John P. Causey Area Director 

William B. Evans, Jr Area Director 

Mrs. Ruth S. Gue Area Director 

Robert S. Jackson Area Director 

John M. King Area Director 

George V. Kirk Area Director 

Theophil K. Muellen Area Director 

Bob R. Nichols Area Director 

Martha A. Satterfield Area Director 

Joseph J. Tarallo Area Director 

William C. Feddeman Director, Supervisory Services 

Frances M. Hanson General Supervisor 

Mrs. Marion Beckwith Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Thomas V. Bilek Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Kieran J. Carroll Supervisor, Secondary Education 

William J. Fleming Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Ernest W. Snodgrass Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Elwood B. Mason Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Noble V. Fritz Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Mrs. Genevieve Blew* Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Philip E. Arsenault Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Edmund T. Burke Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Charles M. Proctor, Jr Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Richard E. Collier Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Etheleen Daniel Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Alan L. Dodd Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Mary L. Gran Supervisor, Elementary Education 

M. Frances Mitchell Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Elizabeth W. Sutton Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Crescent J. Bride Supervisor, Physical Education 

Mrs. Marie F. DeCarlo Supervisor, Language Arts 

Elizabeth Engle Supervisor, Special Class 

Katherine B. Greaney Supervisor, Language Arts 

Charles T. Horn Supervisor, Music 

Mrs. Marjorie E. Jarvi Supervisor, Reading Services 

Leonard T. Oass Supervisor, Industrial Education 

Jacob Rabinovich Supervisor, Social Studies 

Mrs. Majorie B. St. Clair Supervisor, Art 

Julia W. Watkins Supervisor, Home Arts 

Edmund J. Hoffmaster Assistant Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Fred J. Sacco Assistant Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Thomas W. Stevenson Assistant Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Louise G. Winfield Assistant Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Mrs. Norma C. Day Acting Assistant Supervisor, Adult Education 

Mrs. Wretha K. Peterson Assistant Supervisor, Special Class 

Chester J. Petranek Assistant Supervisor, Music 

Barbara L. Riley Assistant Supervisor, Physical Education 

Donald T. Schaeffer Assistant Supervisor, Special Education 

Mrs. Hazel A. Smith Assistant Supervisor, Music 

Elizabeth C. Wilson Director, Curriculum Development 

Mrs. Sonia P. Brenner Assistant Director, Curriculum Development 

Mrs. Mirian T. Tannhauser Assistant Director, Curriculum Development 

Mabel L. McGirr Assistant Principal, Curriculum Development 

James W. Jacobs Director, Instructional Materials 

Harry T. Walker Manager, Central Processing Center, Instructional Materials 

Robert E. Schneider Director, Educational Diagnostic Center 

Mrs. Helen S. Kohut Assistant Supervisor, Educational Diagnostic Center 

T. H. Owen Knight Director, Pupil Services 

William H. Ashbaugh Acting Supervisor, Psychological Services 

Mrs. Ruth W. Beebe Psychological Counselor 

Mrs. Kate C. Kern Acting Psychological Counselor 

Mrs. Margaret C. Battison Psychologist 

Mrs. Louisa R. Bilon Psychologist 

William C. Daly Psychologist 

Michael A. Deem Psychologist 

Mrs. Viviane D. Durell Psychologist 

* Part time 



19 



MONTGOMEEY COUNTY — (Continued) 

Name Office 

B. Miller Eves Psychologist 

Gilbert Ghitelman Psychologist 

Walter L. Hodges Psychologist 

Paul H. Humphreys Psychologist 

Mrs. Ruth H. Linn Psychologist 

Stewart Pennington Psychologist 

Mrs. Blanche D. Rochmes Psychologist 

Mrs. Charlotte M. Simos Psychologist 

Mrs. Mary Jo Smith Psychologist 

Martin W. Spickler Psychologist 

Ernest G. Stickel Psychologist 

George Usdansky Psychologist 

Ernest C. Young Psychologist 

Reno A. Continetti Area Supervisor, Pupil Personnel 

Robert C. Henley Area Supervisor, Pupil Personnel 

Weymouth H. Judkins Area Supervisor, Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Edith P. Popenoe Area Supervisor, Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Marjorie L. Van Dien.... Area Supervisor, Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Mildred D. Clement Pupil Personnel Worker 

Richard A. Cleveland Pupil Personnel Worker 

Robert F. Fioramonti Pupil Personnel Worker 

Jewel A. Green Pupil Personnel Worker 

John H. Grentzner Pupil Personnel Worker 

Edward A. Hebda Pupil Personnel Worker 

Raymond P. Henry Pupil Personnel Worker 

Andrew L. Hugar Pupil Personnel Worker 

John E. McCue Pupil Personnel Worker 

Carl E. Mitchell Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Joan H. Peck Pupil Personnel Worker 

William B. Prigg, Jr Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Hope M. Reid Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Geraldine M. Reynolds Pupil Personnel Worker 

Joseph A. Sagnari Pupil Personnel Worker 

Henry T. Shetterly Pupil Personnel Worker 

Harold R. Veit Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Eileen D. Wilkinson Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Marie H. Wilson Pupil Personnel Worker 

William R. Porter Supervisor, Pupil Appraisal, Placement, and Itinerant Services 

Kenneth W. Rollins Supervisor, Guidance 

Mrs. Esther F. Samler Assistant Supervisor, Pupil Evaluation 

William A. Early ...Director, Personnel 

Rufus C. Browning Assistant Director, Personnel 

Mrs. Irma B. Dumford Supervisor, Personnel (Elementary) 

Forrest G. Sheai'in, Jr Supervisor, Personnel (Secondary) 

Charles A. Walker Supervisor, Personnel (Supporting Services) 

Gerald G. Reymore Supervisor, Personnel (Certification) 

Robert G. McCord Coordinator, Professional Advancement 

Mrs. Helen M. Johnson Director, Staff Development 

William L. Broomall Assistant Director, Staff Development 

Paul A. Henry Director, School Services 

Anton N. Suttora Acting Director, Procurement 

Mason A. Nelson Director, Supply 

Richard M. Ream Director, Transportation 

George V. Menke Director, Operations 

Leonard J. Offutt Assistant Director, Operations 

Mrs. Corelli A. David Director, School Lunch 

Mrs. Jane B. Boyd Assistant Director, School Lunch 

Lester J. Welch Acting Director, School Facilities 

Henry J. Hilburn Assistant Director, Planning 

Gardner B. Jordan Director, Site Acquisition 

James H. Sheldon Director, Construction 

Frank Snyder Assistant Director, Construction 

James L. Mullinix Director, Maintenance 

Brian M. Benson Director, Financial Services 

Reginald J. Crockett Assistant Director, Financial Services 

Richard B. Grove Assistant Director, Financial Services 

V. Wilson Campbell Director, Accounting 

Wilton L. Kennedy Director, Auditing 

H. Douglas Hall Director, Data Processing 

Charles W. Hoover Systems Analyst 

J. Gordon McDonald, Jr .> Director, Insurance and Federal Aid 

Alfred B. Rico Director, Payroll 

Mrs. Helen S. Joseph Secretary to the Superintendent of Schools 



20 



PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY 
Upper Marlboro 

Name Office 

William S. Schmidt Superintendent of Schools 

Rowannetta S. Allen Assistant Superintendent of Schools — Elementary Education 

George H. Robinson Assistant Superintendent of Schools — Secondary Education 

Thomas S. Gwynn, Jr Assistant Superintendent of Schools 

Edward S. Beach, Jr Administrative Assistant to the Superintendent 

Arthur E. Robinson Director of School Construction 

Katherine Fossett Director of Pupil Services 

Margaret A. Beardsley Supervisor of Kindergartens 

Emma M. Bowman Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Eunice E. Burdette Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Rita M. Donovan Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

William W. Hall Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Leila V. Hardesty Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Lawrence Hervey Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

A. Mildred Hoyle Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Elisabeth C. Kelly Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Thomas Johnson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Elizabeth McMahon Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Stella Spicknall Supervisor of Reading and Study Skills 

Mrs. Helen H. Brashears Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Nelda Davis Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Gladys Longley Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Bruce Hoak Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Dora Kennedy Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Steven Litz Acting Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Truman S. Klein Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Howard B. Owens Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Mary S. Snouffer Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Russell Olson Coordinator — Adult Education Program and the Evening High School 

Mrs. Mary Beth Wackwitz Supervisor of Art Education 

Mary A. Thompson Supervisor of Health Education and Health Services 

M. Gladys Dickerson Supervisor of Home Economics 

Samuel Geissenhainer Supervisor of Industrial and Vocational Education 

Mrs. Louise B. Bennett Supervisor of Libraries 

Mrs. Frances Lynch Supervisor of Music 

Vincent C. Holochwost Supervisor of Physical Education 

Ada M. Warrington Supervisor of Physical Education 

C. Elizabeth Rieg Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Frances R. Fuchs Assistant Supervisor of Special Education 

Margaret Conant Coordinator — Teacher and Parent Child Study Programs 

Eugenia Balsley Supervisor of Publications 

Francis Parker Coordinator, Safety Education Activities 

Victor Rice Coordinator — Testing and Research 

Mrs, June Baker School Psychologist 

Mrs. Kathleen M. Galdi School Psychologist 

Anne Newton School Psychologist 

Mrs. Martha Odell School Psychologist 

Mrs. Gretta Austin Helping Librarian 

Helen Bowman Helping Librarian 

Emily M. Durrett Helping Librarian 

Harold Bayes Helping Teacher (Foreign Languages) 

William Laslo Helping Teacher (Science) 

Nancy McNary Helping Teacher (Music) 

Yvonne Moore Helping Teacher (Core) 

Thomas Paskalides Helping Teacher (Physical Education) 

Conrad Seeboth Helping Teacher (Mathematics) 

John A. Woods Helping Teacher (Core) 

David Young Helping Teacher (Art) 

Marian E. Lobdell Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Charles Wendorf Assistant Supervisor — Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Edna Arnn Visiting Teacher 

Donald R. Burgess Visiting Teacher 

Phillip Cifizzari Visiting Teacher 

Edward Felegy Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Elizabeth W. Hamilton Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Jane Hammill Visiting Teacher 

Roger W. Hart Visiting Teacher 

Willie Mae Henson Visiting Teacher 

Harry T. Hughes Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Barabara R. Jones Visiting Teacher 

M. Dorothy Jump Visiting Teacher 

Lonnie L. Kisner Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Arlene A. Korn Visiting Teacher 

Otha Myers Visiting Teacher 

Richard A. Myers Visiting Teacher 

Robert C. Nabors Visiting Teacher 



21 



PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY— (Continued) 

Name Office 

Mrs. Charlotte Spencer Visiting Teacher 

Paul Tonetti Visiting Teacher 

Elmer K. Zeller Supervisor of Purchasing 

D. Carl McMillen Director of Personnel and Credentials 

J. Howard Skidmore Assistant Supervisor of Personnel and Credentials 

Florence Spicknall Assistant Supervisor of Personnel and Credentials 

Alan Poole Supervisor of Maintenance 

Lorton Layman Assistant Supervisor of Maintenance 

Leon Stout Assistant Supervisor of Maintenance 

Daniel Wagner Assistant Supervisor of Maintenance 

Franklin B. Klase Supervisor of Custodial Services 

William H. Smith Senior Building Inspector 

Flora Schroyer Supervisor of School Lunch Pi-ogram 

Mrs. Dolores Edelin Assistant Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Mrs. Margaret Young Assistant Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

John W. Heim Supervisor of Transportation 

Russell O. Eckert Assistant Supervisor of Transportation 

Anthony R. Miller Assistant Supervisor of Transportation 

Ruth Jefferson Assistant Treasurer 

Mrs. Helen S. Bowie Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Betty R. Coliinson Assistant Secretary to the Board of Education 

QUEEN ANNE'S COUNTY 
Centrevllle 

Harry C. Rhodes Superintendent of Schools 

John E. Miller Supervisor of High Schools and Supervisor of Transportation 

Mrs. Alberta C. Browne Elementary Supervisor 

Mrs. Margaret S. Stack Elementary Supervisor 

John H. Webb High School Supervisor 

Mrs. Lola P. Brown Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Marie Shortall Financial Secretary 

Donna Harrington Stenographer 

Christine Ray Stenographer 



ST. MARY'S COUNTY 

Leonard town 

Robert E. King, Jr Superintendent of Schools 

James H. Ogden Assistant Superintendent and Director of Instruction 

E. Violette Young Supervisor of Instruction 

Roy E. Pepper Supervisor of Instruction 

Ralph S. Waters Supervisor of Instruction 

Jane G. Mattingly Supervisor of Instruction 

Harriet H. Reeder Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Beulah S. Bennett Visiting Teacher 

Stanley O. Schrader Supervisor of Transportation 

Mrs. Dolores G. Rose Co-ordinator of Cafeteria Services 

Mrs. Elberta W. Hayden Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Amanda M. Gabbe Financial Assistant 

Mrs. Marie B. Burroughs Stenographer 

Mrs. Helen O. Potts Stenographer 

Virginia L. Raley Stenographer 

Carolyn Martin Stenographer 

Mrs. Lois Lococo Receptionist 

Paul T. Hannen Maintenance Engineer 

Howard G. Haverkamp Assistant Maintenance Engineer 

Henry Camp Assistant Maintenance Engineer 

Purnell Frederick Assistant Maintenance Engineer 



SOMERSET COUNTY 

Prince William Street, Princess Anne 

John L. Bond Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Alice Mae C. Beauchamp Supervisor of Elementary Education 

George F. Carrington Supervisor of Secondary Education 

Kermit A. Cottman Supervisor of Elementary and Secondary Education 

Charles O. Burns, Jr Supervisor of Pupil Services 

Clarence N. Baughan Supervisor of Transportation 

Mrs. Alva Bozman Laird Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Marian Tyler Colborn Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Elizabeth H. Murray Clerk-Typist 



22 



TALBOT COUNTY 



P. O. Box 1028, Washington Street, Easton 
Name Office 

Gerald E. Richter Superintendent of Schools 

Arthur R. Higginbottom Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Lillian C. Davis Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Kathleen A. Francis Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Margie E. Slaughter Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

P. Kennard Wright Supervisor of Maintenance 

Edward E. Motovidlak Supervisor of Transportation 

Randolph L. Dunham Controller 

Saliie Ann Yater Secretary 

Carol E. Garey Clerk 

WASHINGTON COUNTY 

Commonwealth Avenue, Hagerstown 

William M. Brish Superintendent of Schools 

William C. Diehl Assistant Superintendent 

William L. Donaldson Assistant Superintendent 

T. Wilson Cahall Administrative Assistant 

Russell L. Kepler Director of Operational Services 

Carl M. Mann Director of Purchasing 

Douglas M. Bivens Director of Curriculum and Supervision 

F. Richard Crowther Director of Finances 

Victor R. Martin Director of Pupil Services 

Carl R. Beer Supervisor of Senior High Schools 

Alva D. Temple Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Annilea H. Browne Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

M. Frances Grimes Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

C. Scott Couchman Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Miriam L. Hoffman Supervisor of Music 

H. Edwin Semler Supervisor of Physical Education 

Alfred C. Roth, Jr Supervisor of Industrial and Vocational Education 

Claude B. Brubeck Supervisor of Driver Education and Safety 

Catherine L. Beachley Supervisor of Guidance and Research 

W. Harland Biggs Supervisor of Plant Operation 

Joseph H. Vance Supervisor of Transportation 

Mrs. Anormallee M. Way Supervisor of School Lunch 

Robert F. Leshher Supervisor of Audio-Visual (Coordinator, Closed-Circuit 

Television Instruction ) 

George H. Ropp Supervisor of Instruction (Closed-Circuit Television Instruction) 

Wilbur G. Kelly Engineer (Closed-Circuit Television Instruction) 

Mrs. Frances H. Machen Visiting Teacher 

Mary E. Byer Visiting Teacher 

James R. Lemmert Visiting Teacher 

Charles W. Ridenour Visiting Teacher 

Theodore S. Hull Purchasing Assistant 

Frank M. Harlacher, Jr Coordinator of Public Information and Publications 

Mrs. Lois R. Malott Secretary to Superintendent 

WICOMICO COUNTY 

Main Street, Salisbury 

Royd A. Mahaffey Superintendent of Schools 

Sheldon B. Dawson Assistant Superintendent of Schools 

Harold A. Fulton Director of Instruction 

Charles R. Berry Supervisor of Instruction 

Marie A. Dashiell Supervisor of Instruction 

Mrs. Mary S. Ellis Supervisor of Instruction 

Martha R. Jones Supervisor of Instruction 

Clarence P. McKinley, Jr Supervisor of Instruction 

Louise L. Mitchell Supervisor of Instruction 

Frederick H. Spigler, Jr Supervisor of Instruction 

Richard B. Sheridan, Jr Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Cora G. Smith Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

H. Victor Keen, Jr Supervisor of Transportation 

Mrs. Louise H. Francis Supervisor of Instruction-Television 

Joanna Lankford Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Geneva D. Purnell Bookkeeper 

Mrs. Louise L. Layfield Bookkeeper-Clerk 

Juanita L. Townsend Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Sara George Clerk-Stenographer 

Mrs. Betty Grice Clerk-Stenographer 

Mrs. Janice W. Miles Clerk-Stenographer 

Helen C. Preuss Clerk-Stenographer 



23 



WORCESTER COUNTY 

Maxket Street, Snow Hill 

Name Office 

Paul S. Hyde Superintendent of Schools 

Alfred S. Hancock Supervisor of High Schools 

Harvey N. Hall Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Louise S. Adkins Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Annie B. Downing Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Wilbur A. Jones Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Ernest G. Holland Assistant Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Clinton D. Cutright Supervisor of Maintenance and Purchasing 

Benjamin W. Nelson Supervisor of Transportation 

Elsie M. Dryden Clerk 

Mrs. Pauline S. Bowen Assistant Clerk 

Mrs. Mary B. Cherrix Assistant Clerk 

Mrs. Arvetta H. Taylor Assistant Clerk 



24 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Letter of Transmittal 26 

Legislation Affecting E^cation 27 

Notes from the Minutes of the State Board of Education 35 

Administrative Divisions of the State Department of Education: 

Instruction 74 

Library Extension 90 

Vocational Education 95 

Certification and Accreditation 100 

Administration and Finance 107 

Research and Development 110 

Vocational Rehabilitation 113 

Dates of Opening and Closing Schools, Length of Session 117 

Enrollment, Teaching Staff, Number of Public and Nonpublic Schools.... 118 

Number of Different Pupils in Public and Nonpublic Schools 119 

Grade Enrollment 120 

Births in Maryland 128 

Education for Handicapped Children, Schools and Classes for Atypical 

Children 129 

Withdrawals in Public Schools 138 

Nonpromotions in Public Schools 139 

High School Graduates: Number, Occupations, Colleges Attended 142 

High School Enrollment by Subject 149 

Enrollment in Individual High School Subjects 150 

Teachers: by Subject Taught, per Average Number Belonging, Size of 
School, Summer School Attendance, Certification, Preparation, 

Resignations, Source 174 

Costs of Maryland Schools: 

State Minimum Program 208 

Per Cent from Each Source 209 

Per Cent Distribution 212 

Cost per Pupil 216 

Average Salary per Teacher and Principal 219 

Transportation 222 

School Lunch, Special Milk 224 

Capital Outlay, Value of School Property, Bonded Indebtedness 228 

Tax Rates, Local Revenue, Assessed Valuation 232 

High School Equivalence 237 

Federal Fund Expenditures 238 

Vocational Education, Adult Education 239 

Maryland State Teachers Colleges 247 

Community College Enrollments 255 

Vocational Rehabilitation 256 

Maryland Public Libraries 258 

Financial Statements 259 

Statistical Tables 267 

Financial Tables for Local Units 280 

Detailed Public High School Tables 296 

Index 312 

25 



January 1, 1964 



The Honorable J. Millard Tawes 
Government House 
Annapolis, Maryland 

Dear Governor Tawes : 

In accordance with the provision of the laws of Maryland, 
I have the honor to present to you herewith, the ninety-seventh 
''annual report covering all operations of the State department 
of education and the support, conditions, progress and needs of 
education throughout the State" for the period beginning July 1, 
1962 and ending June 30, 1963. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr. 
Secretary-Treasurer 
State Board of Education 
Baltimore, Maryland 



26 



Maryland State Department of Education 



27 



1963 MARYLAND LEGISLATION AFFECTING EDUCATION 
Regular Session 

Baltimore City — Bonds 

Chapter 2, Senate Bill 26, authorizes Baltimore City to borrow $35,000,000 
for school buildings and facilities. 

Higher Education 

Chapter 41, Senate Bill 9, creates a board of trustees of state colleges to 
supervise and control higher education in this State. 

Wicomico County — Bonds 

Chapter 48, Senate Bill 137, authorizes Wicomico County to borrow $1,500,- 
000 for school buildings and grounds. 



Condemnation 

Chapter 52, Senate Bill 8, revises the laws and procedure concerning the 
acquisition of private property for public use by condemnation. 

Employees' Retirement System 

Chapter 54, Senate Bill 20, amends the Employees' Retirement System laws 
to make them conform to the provisions of the Militia Law. 

Teachers* Retirement System 

Chapter 55, Senate Bill 21, amends the laws concerning the Teachers' Re- 
tirement System to make them conform with the Militia Law. 

Worcester County — School Bonds 

Chapter 62, Senate Bill 96, authorizes Worcester County to borrow $750,000 
for building and equipping certain named elementary and high schools. 

Teachers' Retirement System 

Chapter 96, Senate Bill 106, permits members of the Teachers' Retirement 
System who have withdrawn accumulated contributions to redeposit 
these contributions in order to receive service credit. 

Scholarships 

Chapter 104, Senate Bill 163, changes the manner of awarding certain legis- 
lative scholarships by the Senator from the Third District of Baltimore 
City. 

St. Mary's Seminary Junior College 

Chapter 112, House Bill 86, amends the general construction loan of 1962 
Avith respect to the appropriation therein to St. Mary's Seminary 
Junior College. 

Kent County — Teachers 

Chapter 114, House Bill 130, authorizes the County Commissioners of Kent 
County to pay retirement benefits to certain retired school teachers. 



28 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



Cecil County — Schools 

Chapter 120, House Bill 261, authorizes the Board of Education of Cecil 
County to sell one school property to the Town Commissioners of 
Charlestown. 

Employees' Retirement System 

Chapter 145, Senate Bill 107, permits members of the Employees' Retire- 
ment System who have withdrawn accumulated contributions to re- 
deposit the contributions and receive service credit. 

Baltimore City — Schools 

Chapter 175, Senate Bill 289, authorizes Baltimore City to borrow $5,000,000 
for building and equipping public schools. 

Harford County — Schools 

Chapter 181, Senate Bill 278, authorizes Harford County to borrow $6,000,000 
for acquiring and improving public schools and community colleges. 

Allegany County — Teachers 

Chapter 212, House Bill 637, provides for an increase in the pensions paid 
by the County Commissioners of Allegany County to certain retired 
public school teachers. 

Vocational Rehabilitation 

Chapter 215, House Bill 221, provides reimbursement for certain expenses 
to the members of the Injured Workers' Rehabilitation Committee and 
establishes a section of rehabilitation within the Workmen's Compen- 
sation Commission. 

Frederick County — Schools 

Chapter 220, House Bill 513, authorizes the County Commissioners of Fred- 
erick County to borrow $6,000,000 for constructing and improving 
public schools. 

Allegany County — Teachers 

Chapter 223, House Bill 636, increases payments to be made from the 
Teachers' Relief Fund of Allegany County. 

Talbot County — Schools 

Chapter 233, House Bill 528, authorizes the County Commissioners of Talbot 
County to borrow $1,000,000 for constructing and improving school 
buildings. 

Howard County — Schools 

Chapter 237, House Bill 793, authorizes the County Commissioners of Howard 
County to borrow $3,000,000 for constructing and equipping schools. 

Harford County — School Board 

Chapter 282, Senate Bill 210, relates to the Board of Education of Harford 
County and shortens the term of one member thereof. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



29 



School Buses 

Chapter 291, Senate Bill 258, relates to registration plates and fees required 
for operating school buses by nonprofit organizations on one day of 
the year, and concerns also the financial responsibility for this one 
day of operation. 

Charles County — Schools 

Chapter 296, Senate Bill 441, authorizes the County Commissioners of 
Charles County to borrow $3,000,000 for constructing and equipping 
schools in Charles County. 

Charles County — School Board 

Chapter 304, Senate Bill 623, concerns the publication of required financial 
accounts by the Board of School Commissioners of Charles County. 

Teachers' Retirement System 

Chapter 307, Senate Bill 17, amends and clarifies the law concerning the 
acceptance of part-time employment by certain retired members of 
the Teachers' Retirement System. 

Teachers' Retirement System 

Chapter 308, Senate Bill 18, amends the laws concerning the computation of 
pensions payable to members of the Teachers* Retirement System. 

Employees' Retirement System 

Chapter 309, Senate Bill 19, relates to the computation of pensions payable 
to members of the Employees' Retirement System. 

Retirement Systems 

Chapter 310, Senate Bill 22, concerns the rates of contribution of members 
transferring between the Employees' Retirement System and Teachers' 
Retirement System. 

Teachers' Retirement System 

Chapter 315, Senate Bill 269, relates to special allowances in the Teachers' 
Retirement System for certain widows of former public school teachers. 

Teachers' Retirement System 

Chapter 328, Senate Bill 476, makes applicable to certain members of the 
State Teachers' Retirement System the average final compensation 
as defined by an amendment enacted in 1955. 

Employees' Retirement System 

Chapter 329, Senate Bill 477, makes applicable to certain members of the 
Employees' Retirement System the average final compensation as 
defined by an amendment enacted in 1955. 

University of Maryland 

Chapter 332, Senate Bill 529, authorizes the Board of Regents of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland to acquire land and other property in Baltimore 
City by condemnation and provides for the procedure with respect 
thereto. 



30 NINETY-SE^^NTH ANNUAL REPORT 

Employees' Retirement System 

Chapter 334, Senate Bill 615, provides that any member of the Employees' 
Retirement System may withdraw his additional and voluntary con- 
tributions, with interest, if the refund is requested within one year 
after July 1, 1963. 



Allegany County — Schools 

Chapter 354, Senate Bill 435, authorizes the County Commissioners of Al- 
legany County to borrow $400,000 for schools and school facilities in 
Allegany County. 

Washington County — Teachers 

Chapter 355, Senate Bill 447, increases the pensions of certain teachers who 
taught in the Washington County schools for at least twenty years. 

Scholarships 

Chapter 370, Senate Bill 452, relates to the administration of the State- 
wide competitive examination for Senatorial scholarships, to the 
curriculum requirements of the Peabody Institute, and to the determi- 
nation of financial need for scholarships, and adds the Third District 
of Baltimore City to those subdivisions whose Senators may select 
recipients to certain scholarships. 

Scholarships 

Chapter 371, Senate Bill 454, requires eligible institutions to submit to the 
State Scholarship Board certain information concerning a program of 
State scholarship awards generally known as the Senatorial Scholar- 
ship Program. 

Scholarships 

Chapter 373, Senate Bill 468, provides generally for a program of scholar- 
ships in education, and a general State scholarship program under 
the State Scholarship Board, and relates generally to scholarships 
and their award and administration in this State. 

Queen Anne's County — Schools 

Chapter 374, Senate Bill 550, authorizes the County Commissioners of Queen 
Anne's County to borrow $3,000,000 for public school buildings and 
facilities. 

County School Boards 

Chapter 377, Senate Bill 594, revises the laws concerning conflict of interests 
provisions as they affect members of county boards of education and 
county superintendents of schools. 

St. Mary's County — Scholarships 

Chapter 379, Senate Bill 612, authorizes the County Commissioners of St. 
Mary's County to award scholarships to freshmen entering St. Mary's 
Seminary Junior College. 

Somerset County — Libraries 

Chapter 434, House Bill 108, amends the local laws of Somerset County 
with respect to the annual payment to be made by the County Com- 
missioners to certain libraries in the County. 



Maryland State Department of Education 31 
Employees' Retirement System 

Chapter 448, House Bill 330, concerns optional allowances under the State 
Employees' Retirement System. 

Washington County — Library 

Chapter 464, House Bill 895, increases the annual appropriation by the 
County Commissioners of Washington County to the Washington 
County Free Library. 

Somerset County — Schools 

Chapter 478, House Bill 115, concerns the School Building Fund of Somerset 
County. 

Employees' Retirement System 

Chapter 480, House Bill 165, concerns the percentage rate of contribution 
of certain members of the Employees' Retirement System who were 
contributing thereto prior to July 1, 1947. 

University of Maryland 

Chapter 537, Senate Bill 73, authorizes the University of Maryland to 
establish branches in Baltimore County, the Central Eastern Shore 
area, the Central Western Maryland area, and the Southern Mary- 
land area. 

State Debt— Schools 

Chapter 542, Senate Bill 437, authorizes the creation of a State debt in the 
amount of $50,000,000 for financing the construction of public school 
buildings and facilities. 

State Debt— St. Joseph College 

Chapter 545, Senate Bill 641, authorizes a State debt in the amount of 
$750,000 for constructing a new Science Building on the campus of 
St. Joseph College of the Daughters of Charity of St. Joseph Vincent 
DePaul, Inc. in Emmitsburg, subject to certain requirements. 

State Debt — Western Maryland College 

Chapter 546, Senate Bill 642, authorizes the creation of a State debt in the 
amount of $500,000 for the construction of a new science wing to 
Lewis Hall and a new dining room on the campus of Western Mary- 
land College in Westminster, subject to certain requirements. 

Worcester County — Schools 

Chapter 554, Senate Bill 91, increases the membership of the Board of 
Education of Worcester County and provides for the appointment 
of the additional members. 

Higher Education — Loan Program 

Chapter 589, Senate Bill 356, creates the Higher Education Loan Corpora- 
tion, defines its powers and duties, and provides for the lending of 
funds to persons to assist them in meeting the expenses of higher 
education. 



32 Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 

Retirement Systems 

Chapter 601, House Bill 35, permits former members of the Teachers' 
Retirement System and of the Employee's Retirement System who 
have withdrawn their accumulated contributions after they were trans- 
ferred to a United States facility to redeposit their contributions and 
receive service credit therefor upon return to State service. 

Physical Fitness 

Chapter 606, House Bill 265, creates the Maryland Commission on Physical 
Fitness and provides generally for powers, duties, operations, members, 
and personnel; and also confers powers on certain political subdivisions 
with respect to physical fitness. 

Frederick County — Schools 

Chapter 669, House Bill 633, increases the annual expense allowances of 
members of the Frederick County Board of Education. 

Prince George's County — Schools 

Chapter 681, House Bill 560, authorizes Prince George's County to borrow 
$25,000,000 for public school buildings and facilities. 

State Board of Education 

Chapter 683, House Bill 622, requires the filing of essential academic records 
of certain former students with the State Superintendent of Schools 
by certain nonpublic educational institutions which are discontinuing 
operations. 

Handicapped Children 

Chapter 686, House Bill 747, concerns the annual appropriation for special 
education and training of handicapped children under the age of six 
years. 

Washington County — Free Library 

Chapter 687, House Bill 868, concerns the furnishing of State aid to the 
Washington County Free Library. 

Washington County — Schools 

Chapter 690, House Bill 943, authorizes Washington County to borrow 
$9,000,000 for public school buildings and facilities. 



Washington County — Schools 

Chapter 693, House Bill 1109, relates to the proceeds from the sale of school 
lands and facilities in Washington County and to the placing of such 
monies into a special school fund. 



State Debt— St. John's College 

Chapter 698, House Bill 125, authorizes the creation of a State debt in the 
amount of $75,000 to aid in the construction of an addition to the 
library on the campus of St. John's College, subject to certain condi- 
tions and requirements. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



33 



Postgraduate Fellowships 

Chapter 779, House Bill 720, provides for a State Fellowship Program for 
postgraduate work at the University of Maryland, relating to its ad- 
ministration, and specifying the details, procedures, and requirements 
applicable thereto. 

Anne Arundel County — Schools 

Chapter 804, House Bill 1002, authorizes Anne Arundel County to borrow 
$10,000,000 for public schools and community colleges. 

Montgomery County — Schools 

Chapter 813, House Bill 550, provides generally for a primary election sys- 
tem for electing the County Board of Education of Montgomery County. 

Employees' Retirement System 

Chapter 824, House Bill 731, amends the law concerning the Employees' 
Retirement System to make applicable to certain members of the 
System the average final compensation as defined by an amendment 
enacted in 1955. 

Fiscal Year 

Chapter 825, House Bill 3, provides for a uniform fiscal year for the State 
and for all counties, incorporated cities, towns, and taxing districts; 
relates also to taxable year, date of finality, levy, date of levy; due 
date, overdue date for taxes; assessments, and taxes generally in 
this State. 

Teachers' Retirement System 

Chapter 831, House Bill 732, makes applicable to certain members of the 
Teachers' Retirement System the average final compensation as de- 
fined by an amendment enacted in 1955. 

Anne Arundel County — Schools 

Chapter 837, House Bill 1073, includes Anne Arundel County in the pro- 
visions requiring the County Board of Education to submit annual 
financial reports to the County Commissioners. 

Anne Arundel County — Schools 

Chapter 854, House Bill 126, relates to the use of public school buses by 
children attending parochial schools and private schools in Anne 
Arundel County. 

Baltimore City — Scholarships 

Chapter 875, Senate Bill 175, adds the Third District of Baltimore City to 
those subdivisions whose Senators may select scholarship recipients 
to certain colleges. 

State Employees 

Chapter 902, Senate Bill 630, provides that any State employee promoted 
through reclassification of his existing job or position involving no 
substantial change in duties or responsibilities shall not be required 
to serve an added probationary period. 



34 Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 

State Debt 

Chapter 903, Senate Bill 139, authorizes the creation of a State debt in the 
aggregate amount of $27,576,000 for certain building and construction 
purposes. 

Allegany County School Board 

Joint Resolution 18 requests the School Board of Allegany County to pub- 
licize the prospective expiration date of school bus contracts. 

Family Life 

Joint Resolution 25 requests the State Department of Public Welfare, the 
State Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, the State Board 
of Education, and private family and children's agencies to take action 
to strengthen family life in Maryland. 

Allegany High School 

Joint Resolution 49 commends and congratulates Allegany High School for 
winning the "A" title in the State High School Basketball Tournament. 

State Employees 

Joint Resolution 57 urges the Commissioner of Personnel to develop a policy 
and to report to the Legislative Council concerning payment of extra 
compensation for late hours and overtime work performed by State 
employees. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



35 



NOTES FROM THE MINUTES OF THE STATE BOARD OF 
EDUCATION AND THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE STATE 
TEACHERS COLLEGES 

Special Meeting— July 17, 1962 

At the request of Dr. Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., State Superin- 
tendent of Schools, Mr. T. Wilson Cahall, Supervisor of Special 
Projects, reported on the status of a plan for the better utiliza- 
tion of professional talent in the public schools of Maryland in 
accordance with the grant of $15,000 from the Fund for the 
Advancement of Education to the Maryland State Department 
of Education. In his report Mr. Cahall quoted the following para- 
graph from a letter of August 11, 1961, to Dr. Pullen from Dr. 
Lester W. Nelson, Treasurer of the Fund for the Advancement 
of Education: 

"We further understand that the purpose of activities for which 
the grant represents a partial support will be the development of 
plans for action based on more complete utilization of the professional 
talent of the public schools of the state. Such fuller utilization will 
include extended use of talent on a year-round basis, development of 
instructional materials, inservice leadership and teacher improvement 
programs, development of experimental, demonstration and pilot pro- 
grams in the schools." 

Mr. Cahall then called attention to the following statements 
in his report: 

Education is being called on to encourage all students to develop 
their full potential, broaden their competencies, and raise their at- 
tainment levels. 

These demands are being made in the face of limited facilities in 
personnel to accomplish the task. 

Among these changes will be the fullest possible use of the capa- 
bilities of the professional, technical, clerical, and subprofessional 
personnel for longer periods of time than has been traditionally the 
case. 

The regulatory and operational functions of the State Department 
of Education are clearly defined and carefully spelled out in certain 
specified areas. The equally important and less rigid function of 
leadership makes the influence of the Department felt in the quality 
of programs offered by the local school systems of the State. 

The Maryland State Department of Education has attained a 
valuable asset in the establishment of a well-organized division of 
research . . . the effort that is most seriously needed is in the area 
of development which grows out of the result of research which has 
been conducted in and out of the State. 

Perhaps the activity which the Maryland school system most 
needs to move forward its program in 1962 is a carefully planned 
and directed program of dissemination of the best practices through 
demonstration and reorganization. The superintendents, both State 
and local, desire innovation and bold new efforts in the areas of 
organization, instruction, and supervision in the individual schools 
of the State. They stand ready to foster these efforts by sound finance 
and the provision of leadership and resource help in many ways. But 
the fact remains that the distance between the sphere of operation 
of the superintendent and the local school is rather great. 

There are many individuals operating between the two spheres 
whose influence is quite forceful and direct. Many individuals in the 



36 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



local school systems have reported that they would w^elcome an op- 
portunity to apply one or more of the new procedures that have 
been tested. They need leadership, time, and consultant help as well 
as finances in order to initiate and carry out innovations and changes. 

Several local systems are in the process of preparing proposals 
for projects in which they are especially interested. 

Mr. Cahall then reviewed briefly a synopsis of the six proj- 
ects in the proposed plan, outlining the objectives, projects, and 
desired outcomes. He pointed out that any one of the projects 
might be operated without the others and that all of the projects 
might be undertaken in a modest way and allowed to grow and 
develop as money and resources become available. The six sug- 
gested projects are: 

Project 1 — State-wide Educational Television System 

Project 2 — Work-study Program in Teacher Education 

Project 3 — Demonstration Schools 

Project 4 — State-wide Curriculum Development 

Project 5 — Work-study Program for Principals, Supervisors, and 

Potential Leaders 

Project 6 — Twelve-month Employment of Selected Teachers in 

Two Systems 

The Board agreed in principle with the report and appointed 
a special committee to formulate a proposal to be presented to 
the Fund for the Advancement of Education, with an estimate 
of the cost. 

Dr. Wesley N. Dorn, Director of Research and Development, 
reviewed two reports on educational television — "Developments 
Concerning Educational Television in Maryland, June 1962" and 
an exhibit presented at the May Board meeting, ''Expansion of 
Educational Television in Maryland." 

In accordance with action of the State Board of Education 
on May 31, 1962, the State Superintendent of Schools wrote 
Governor J. Millard Tawes requesting that the State Department 
of Education be designated as the State educational television 
agency. In his reply the Governor expressed an interest in the 
program of educational television for the State of Maryland and 
requested that the State Superintendent of Schools and the Presi- 
dent of the University of Maryland explore together ways and 
means of providing the best system of educational television. 
The State Superintendent of Schools informed the Governor that 
a committee from the University of Maryland and the State De- 
partment of Education would confer prior to a meeting between 
Dr. Wilson H. Elkins and Dr. Pullen. 

On June 20, 1962, a steering committee of the Maryland 
Committee on Educational Television met with the Governor and 
presented a resolution requesting that the Governor appoint the 
State Department of Education as the State educational television 
agency and requesting further that the State educational tele- 
vision agency be directed to appoint a broadly representative 
advisory committee. The State Superintendent of Schools was 
invited by the Governor to attend this meeting, and representa- 



Maryland State Department of Edt^cation 



37 



tives from the Governor's office, the University of Maryland, 
and the State Department of Education were present, in addition 
to a group of lay citizens representing the Maryland Committee 
on Educational Television. 

On June 23, 1962, a group of approximately 40 citizens, 
representing lay groups, met to discuss the progress to date in 
the development of educational television in Maryland. They 
endorsed the resolution prepared by their steering committee 
and requested that the committee be informed of further 
progress. 

On June 26, 1962, the State Superintendent of Schools wrote 
the Federal Communications Commission requesting that the 
Commission make no further assignments of channels in Mary- 
land until agencies, such as the State Department of Education, 
are given an opportunity to present plans for educational utili- 
zation of television channels. This letter was written because of 
commercial interest in an additional television channel allocation 
for Salisbury. 

On June 28, 1962, representatives from the State Depart- 
ment of Education and the University of Maryland met to discuss 
problems involved in designating the State educational television 
agency. 

In reviewing his report of May 31, 1962, Dr. Dorn discussed : 

The Coordination of Educational Television in Maryland 

As previously reported to the Board, the State Department of 
Education and the local school systems have worked together for a 
number of years on the educational uses of television. Under the 
chairmanship of Dr. William M. Brish, Superintendent of Schools in 
Washington County, a committee report was prepared entitled "State 
Committee on Television for Education: Observations and Opinions." 
The State Department of Education and the local school systems have 
also been working together on ways of expanding educational tele- 
vision. Dr. Brish is also serving as chairman of this group, which has 
worked with The Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Company, mem- 
bers of the staff of the National Educational Television and Radio 
Center, and interested citizens. Data have been gathered concerning 
the cost of various methods of expanding educational television through 
open- and closed-circuit methods, and information has been obtained 
concerning the provisions of the recent Federal legislation. 

In addition to those persons who are involved primarily in tele- 
vising programs designed for systematic instruction of pupils in school, 
there are many groups in the State who are interested in the fullest 
possible use of educational television to serve the broad educational 
and cultural needs of all the people. A coordinated approach to the 
development of educational television within the State is necessary 
if the maximum educational benefits are to be realized. 

As noted above, the State Board on May 31, 1962, requested the 
State Superintendent to write Governor Tawes requesting that the 
State Department of Education be designated as the State educational 
television agency. In this connection, Mr. Jerome Framptom, Jr., 
President of the State Board of Education, stated that he had studied 
carefully what is going on in educational television outside the State. 
He feels that this is a tremendously important program, that the 
responsible agency must be the State Department of Education rather 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 

than a separate commission or agency, and that the Board has the 
legal responsibility for carrying on the program of education in the 
State of Maryland. He commended his colleagues for their action. 

Open-Circuit Educational Television Stations 

Many important questions must be answered before the number 
of educational stations, their specific locations, and the ownership 
and operation of such stations can be determined. 

By means of open-circuit broadcasts, programs can be received 
by any person in the broadcast range who has the proper kind of 
receiver. Instructional programs during school hours designed pri- 
marily for classroom use can be received not only in the schools but 
also in the homes. In addition, instructional programs can be broad- 
cast for preschool children and for adults, and programs of a more 
general cultural nature can be broadcast for the general public. Each 
open-circuit educational television station can broadcast only one 
program at a time. 

As of January, 1962, there were 63 educational television stations 
in operation in the United States of which 44 were VHF stations 
and 19 were UHF stations. No VHF channels are available in Mary- 
land for educational television, but the FCC has allocated a number 
of UHF channels to Maryland. These UHF channels do not have to 
be used for educational television. The only one presently reserved 
for educational television in Maryland is Channel 66 in Baltimore. 
Other reservations can be requested. 

Figures were presented showing a wide range of estimated costs 
for pilot projects and for a State-wide coverage of educational 
television. 

Recent Federal legislation authorized $32,000,000 for acquisition 
and construction of educational television facilities, with each state 
being eligible to receive up to $1,000,000. If Maryland were to match 
the maximum amount of Federal funds which might be available, it 
would be possible to construct six educational television broadcast 
facilities, assuming approximately $335,000 per station, or eight edu- 
cational television broadcast facilities at $250,000 per station. It 
should be possible to cover practically the entire State of Maryland 
with six or eight open-circuit educational television broadcast stations, 
if they were properly located and had adequate power. 

In answer to a question to minimize the cost by selling part of 
the time commercially, as is done in one or two other places in the 
country, it was stated that the Federal Communications Commission 
will not permit profit. However, a station may be used part of the 
day as a commercial station and part of the day as an educational 
station. Although the FCC does not permit advertising, it is possible 
for an educational television system to get companies to give courtesy 
programs. 

Dr. Dom pointed out that it is not necessary for each educational 
television station to produce its own programs. There are several ways 
and combinations of ways to supplement live broadcasts from a station: 

1. Stations can be connected by microwave to form a network. 

2. A videotape recorder can be used to "tape" a program it re- 
ceives over the network for later broadcast, or a tape can be produced 
at any station having the equipment and sent to any other station 
that can play the tape. 

3. The National Educational Television and Radio Center provides 
to stations affiliated with it a service of 10 hours of programs per 
week averaging some 20 individual subjects, from a library of over 
2,500 different programs in six categories. 

The Board requested the Federal Communications Commission to 
take into consideration the need for educational television channels 
in Maryland and withhold further assignments of television channels 



Maryland State Department of Education 



39 



in Maryland until the State Board has been given an opportunity to 
present plans for the educational utilization of television channels 
which are presently available or may become available in the near 
future. 

State-wide Closed-circuit Educational Television Network 

Closed-circuit television has several advantages over open-circuit 
television for meeting instructional needs in the schools. As many as 
six different lessons can be transmitted simultaneously over one coaxial 
cable. Since at any given time there are pupils in many grades and 
pupils taking many different subjects, the broadcast of one lesson 
at a time through open-circuit television has definite limitations. 
Furthermore, FCC regulations do not apply to closed-circuit telecasts. 
The quality of reception is excellent regardless of the distance a school 
is from the studio and regardless of the nature of the terrain, which 
sometimes interferes with open-circuit reception. Closed-circuit tele- 
vision, however, cannot be received in homes or schools not connected 
by microwave or cable. 

A great deal of flexibility in the origination and exchange of 
educational programs is possible when school buildings within a school 
system are connected by coaxial cable and school systems are con- 
nected with each other through distribution centers that are inter- 
connected by microwave. Educational programs can then be originated 
within a school system for its own use or can be picked up from 
another school system. By the use of video-tape recordings, school 
systems can tape programs for later use when they are most ap- 
propriate for the particular school program. If there were State-wide 
coverage of closed-circuit television, educational programs having 
general use throughout the State could be developed with the coopera- 
tion of the State Department of Education. A library of video-tape 
recordings could be developed. 

Many of the rates charged by the telephone company in various 
states for microwave and coaxial cable transmission of televised pro- 
grams have been on a "pilot" basis, and the rates have not been 
standarized. The annual charge for transmitting by microwave from 
a center in each of the 24 local school systems to six regional centers 
would range from approximately $170,000 for one microwave channel 
in one direction to approximately $555,000 for four microwave chan- 
nels in one direction and one microwave channel in the reverse direc- 
tion. This latter arrangement would make it possible for any of the 
local school systems to transmit programs to other school systems 
as well as receive simultaneous programs from other local school 
systems. 

In order for programs to be received in the classrooms by closed- 
circuit television, it is necessary that the signal be transmitted from 
a center in each local school system to outlets in individual classrooms 
in individual school buildings. The estimated annual charge for dis- 
tributing four simultaneous programs to each school (or a combination 
of from three to six programs, depending upon need) would be ap- 
proximately $3,920,000 if 38,250 outlets were connected. 

Not every local school system would have to originate its own 
programs in a closed-circuit system. In those school systems which 
want to originate their own programs, a suitable studio with relatively 
simple equipment in an existing building would cost approximately 
$35,000. 

It was decided to continue the discussion of educational 
television at the next Board Meeting. 

Mr. Paul E. Huffington, Director of Instruction, presented 
to the Board members copies of the revised report, Policies and 



40 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



Programs, Public Secondary Education in Maryland. This is the 
first bulletin in a series of two ; the second will have to do with 
principles and standards. 

September 13, 1962 
Action of the Board included: 

Passed the following resolution on the death of Dr. Willis 
H. White, Director of Division of Instruction in the State De- 
partment of Education, on June 9, 1962: 

Resolution on Dr. Willis H. White 

The State Board of Education has learned with deep regret of 
the death on June 9, 1962, of Dr. Willis H. White, Director of the 
Division of Instruction in the State Department of Education. 

Dr. White was bom on June 27, 1901. A native of Talbot County, 
he was graduated from Easton High School. He received the B.A. 
degree from St. John's College, Annapolis, in 1922, and the M.A. 
degree from the University of Maryland in 1930. In 1957 Dr. White 
was awarded an Ed.D. degree from the University of Maryland. 

Dr. White began his teaching career at Annapolis High School 
in 1922. From 1930-33 he served as principal of the Bladensburg 
Junior High School in Prince George's County. In 1933 he went to 
Calvert County High School as principal. From 1942-48 he served as 
principal of the Cambridge High School, and from 1948-52 he was 
principal of the Kenwood High School in Baltimore County. In 1952 
Dr. White was appointed State Supervisor of High Schools in the 
State Department of Education and served in that capacity until 1956 
when he was made Assistant Director of the Division of Instruction. 
In 1958 he became Director of the Division of Instniction. 

From the beginning of his career in education. Dr. White always 
assumed an active role in both local and State professional organiza- 
tions. He was a past president of the Maryland State Teachers' As- 
sociation and served for eleven years as a member of the Board of 
Trustees of the Maryland Teachers' Retirement System. 

Dr. White's career as a teacher and administrator exemplified 
the highest type of professional endeavor and leadership qualities. 
He will be sadly missed by professional colleagues who respected his 
keen insights in dealing with educational problems, his vision in ad- 
vancing new teaching procedures and academic scholarship, and Ms 
general statesmanship in perceiving worthy ideas and applying them 
to classroom situations. 

Aside from his official responsibilities, Dr. White played an active 
role in numerous civic, fraternal, and community service groups. 

The Board wishes to express its deepest sympathy to Dr. White's 
wife and family and to express publicly its appreciation and gratitude 
for the services he rendered to education in Maryland. 

Approved the Training Program Agreement, Manpower 
Development and Training Act, Public Law 87-415, for the period 
from date of signing until June 30, 1963. 

Approved staff changes in the State Department of Educa- 
tion which included : 

Wesley N. Dorn From Acting Director to Director, 

Division of Research and De- 
velopment, effective July 1, 
1962 



Maryland State Department of Education 



41 



Mrs. Grace A. Dorsey From Supervisor of Elementary 

Schools to Assistant Director 
of Instruction, effective Au- 
gust 1, 1962. 

Paul E. Huffington Prom Assistant Director and Su- 
pervisor of High Schools to Di- 
rector of Instruction, eifective 
August 1, 1962 

George E. Klinkhamer... Appointed Educational Supervisor 

of Special Education, effective 
September 5, 1962. Mr. Klink- 
hamer replaced Mrs. Rozelle 
J. Miller while she was on a 
year's leave of absence to do 
graduate study. 

Jack R. Nicholas From Counselor to Assistant Su- 
pervisor in Charge, Eastern 
Shore District Office, Voca- 
tional Rehabilitation, effective 
August 15, 1962 

Raymond H. Simmons.... From Assistant Supervisor in 

Charge, Eastern Shore Dis- 
trict Office, Vocational Reha- 
bilitation, to Supervisor, Vo- 
cational Rehabilitation, State 
Office, effective August 15, 
1962 

Percy V. Williams Appointed Educational Supervisor 

of Pupil Services, effective 
August 1, 1962 

Approved a policy statement — Strengthening Our De- 
mocracy through Education, Meeting the Challenge of Com- 
munism and Other Totalitarian Ideologies. At the request of Dr. 
Pullen, Mr. Huffington gave the background of this policy state- 
ment. He reported that in view of the increasing concern of 
many persons and groups throughout the Nation about the 
threats of Communism and other totalitarian ideologies, the State 
Superintendent of Schools in March, 1962, appointed a State 
committee to study ways of strengthening the curriculum through 
increased emphasis on the teaching of Americanism. This com- 
mittee met initially in April to explore this area and after much 
discussion decided that the first step was to formulate a state- 
ment of policy regarding the teaching about Communism and 
other totalitarian ideologies for the public school systems of the 
State. It was felt that such a statement would undergird the 
program of the local school systems. The policy statement was 
read and approved by outstanding authorities in this field and 
then unanimously adopted by the committee. Dr. Pullen added 



42 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



that he thought it would be of great help throughout the State 
if the State Board of Education would give its sanction to this 
statement. 

Amended, on the recommendation of the local public school 
superintendents of Maryland, Bylaw 51, Maximum Credit for 
Winter Courses, to read as follows: 

A maximum of six semester hours' credit for a 
course or courses completed during any one school year 
(September to June) under the auspices of an approved 
college may be counted toward the requirement for a 
certificate. However, upon the written consent of the 
local superintendent of schools three additional semester 
hours of credit may be earned and counted toward the 
requirement for a certificate. 

Approved the ''Suggestions for Board of Library Trustees 
Audit Reports" prepared by the State Department of Education 
for the guidance of the boards of library trustees. 

Approved procedure for the administration of the General 
Public Junior or Community College Construction Loans of 1961 
and 1962. This procedure is a revision of that approved by the 
State Board on May 31, 1962. It was then revised in accordance 
with action of the Board of Public Works. 

Approved the 1964 State Department of Education Budget 
requests for Headquarters and Vocational Rehabilitation in the 
amount of $3,485,099. 

As the Board of Trustees of the State Teachers Colleges : 

Approved the offering of courses to the teachers of Mont- 
gomery County by the State Teachers College at Frostburg. 

Approved a priority listing of 44 capital improvements proj- 
ects for the State teachers colleges for 1963-64, amounting to 
a total estimated cost of $9,862,820. 

Approved the following faculty salary scale for the State 
teachers colleges, effective beginning with the year 1963-64 : 

Rank Annual Minimum Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Maximum 
Increment 

Professor $600 $9,500 $10,100 $10,700 $11,300 $11,900 $12,500 

-A-Ssocis-tG 

Professor 500 8,000 8,500 9,000 9,500 10,000 10,500 

Professor 400 6,500 6,900 7,300 7,700 8,100 8,500 
Instructor 300 5,500 5,800 6,100 6,400 6,700 7,000 

It was pointed out that the top of the professional scale is the 
same as the current salary for presidents but that the increased 
scales for the presidents and deans previously approved by the 
Board are included in the 1964 budget requests. 

Repealed Bylaw 66 and approved a tenure policy for faculty 
members, Maryland State Teachers Colleges. This was adopted 
as Bylaw 78, effective July 1, 1962. 

Approved the offering of certain professional education 
courses at the State Teachers College at Bowie, effective Septem- 



Maryland State Department of E^ducation 



43 



ber 1, 1962, which would qualify liberal arts graduates in that 
area to apply for high school certification in Maryland. 

Recommended to the Board of Public Works that the new 
health and infirmary building at State Teachers College at Tow- 
son be named the Dowell Health Center. Dr. Anita S. Dowell 
was for forty years a member of the faculty at Towson, a na- 
tionally known figure in the field of health education, and the 
first to hold the position of Dean at Towson. 

Approved a total operating budget request of $7,953,489 
for the State teachers colleges for 1963-64. 

Members of the Board were advised that on July 5, 1962, 
the Board of Public Works had approved the request of the 
Board of Trustees to name three new buildings on the campus 
of the State Teachers College at Frostburg as follows: the new 
dormitory building in honor of Mr. Ivan C. Diehl, Dean of In- 
struction; the new library building in honor of Mr. Jerome 
Framptom, Jr., President of the State Board of Education ; and 
the new science building in honor of Governor J. Millard Tawes. 

Members of the Board were advised that the Board of Public 
Works had approved a new basic mileage allowance of ten cents 
per mile for State employees who are required to use privately- 
owned automobiles on State business, effective July 1, 1962. 

The Board's attention was called to a new publication of 
the State Department of Education, Standard Rules and Regu- 
lations Governing Public School Transportation for the State 
of Maryland, being Bylaw 12 as passed by Resolution of the 
Maryland State Board of Education on February 28, 1962. 

At Dr. Pullen's request. Dr. Zimmerman reported that a 
planning committee to make the necessary plans and arrange- 
ments for the two State-wide conferences for administrators, 
principals, and supervisors at the elementary and secondary 
levels had decided to hold the Secondary Conference on March 
21 and 22, 1963, and the Elementary Conference on April 25 
and 26, 1963. 

Members of the Board were given copies of a public state- 
ment by the State Superintendent of Schools on the Supreme 
Court decision respecting the New York prayer in which he 
stated : 

"As far as I can see, the decision of the Supreme Court does not 
say that prayers that are not prescribed or required by any govern- 
mental agency are prohibited by the Constitution. In brief, at the 
moment I do not see how the decision would affect the practices of 
the voluntary saying of prayers in the public schools or in any edu- 
cational institution receiving public money in the State of Maryland." 

Members of the Board were given copies of correspondence 
between Dr. Pullen and Governor Tawes concerning Public Law 
87-415 (Manpower Development and Training Act). On May 9, 
Dr. Pullen requested permission from the Governor to accept 
Federal funds for the first two years of the program for the 
training or retraining of the unemployed. Maryland will prob- 



44 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



ably receive about ^10,000 for emplojanent of personnel for the 
remainder of fiscal year 1962; $1,100,000 for fiscal year 1963; 
$1,800,000 for fiscal year 1964, and $1,800,000 for fiscal year 
1965. Under date of June 19, the Governor granted permission 
for the Department to accept these funds, with the understanding 
''that for the first two years the program will be supported solely 
by Federal funds" and that at the end of that time ''it is con- 
templated that the program will be on a matching basis of State 
and Federal funds." The Governor added that he did not think 
it advisable "to commit the State to a program that far in ad- 
vance" and suggested that "after a year's experience we review 
the merits of the program and the advisability of our continued 
participation." 

Members of the Board were also given copies of the agree- 
ment necessary to carry out the provisions of the Manpower 
Development and Training Act of 1962. 

At Dr. Pullen's request, Miss Nettie Taylor, Director of 
the Division of Library Extension, reported that a committee 
of public library administrators had been appointed by the State 
Superintendent of Schools to study the need for improved refer- 
ence and information services from the Enoch Pratt Free Library 
to the citizens of the State through the county public libraries. 
The committee has submitted its report. Its chief recommendation 
is that a teletypewriter system of communication be established 
between all the county public libraries and the Enoch Pratt Free 
Library, to be financed through the State Department of Educa- 
tion budget. This system would permit the quick answering of 
reference and informational requests from library users all over 
the State; it would supplement the reference resources of the 
local libraries which are frequently inadequate to give answers 
to specialized requests for information; it would also speed up 
by several days the time lag between the time the local library 
patron requests a book and the time he may receive it, since, 
whenever necessary, such requests may be made by teletype 
rather than by mail service, as is the current practice. The tele- 
type would have an additional advantage in that county libraries 
could use it to communicate with each other and to facilitate 
interlibrary loan and reference requests. This would be of par- 
ticular value to the cooperating libraries of the Eastern Shore 
w^here exchange of requested materials and answers to reference 
questions are proving of mutual advantage to all libraries, and 
to the Southern Maryland libraries where the same practices 
could be facilitated easily with this system. This would permit 
the libraries of the State to render an extremely valuable service 
to the citizens of the State and could not be available in any 
other feasible way. 

The annual cost of the service, including rental of teletype- 
writer equipment and staffing by Pratt Library, would be ap- 
proximately $50,000. Funds to implement this service are being 
included in the 1963-64 budget request of the State Department 



Maryland State Department of Education 



45 



of Education. Improved informational resources and services 
have been cited by the pubHc librarians as one of the most press- 
ing needs. The use of a teletype communication system seems a 
most economical and wise use of rapid communication devices 
for improved library service to the citizens of the State. 

Miss Taylor reported that, through the efforts of Dr. Pullen 
and Senator George L. Radcliffe, President of the Maryland 
Historical Society, the Board of Public Works had appropriated 
$10,000 to the State Department of Education for the prepara- 
tion of an index to the Maryland Historical Magazine. This 
project had the support of the Maryland Association of Public 
Library Administrators, the Maryland Library Association, and 
the Enoch Pratt Free Library, all of whom believe this project 
to be of great value to the libraries of the State. The index cards 
will be open to the public and available to other Maryland institu- 
tions having the means of making photostatic or microfilm copies. 

Members of the Board were given copies of a letter from 
Dr. Wayne 0. Reed, U. S. Commissioner of Education, to Dr. 
Pullen in which he stated that the program of the Maryland 
State Plan for Further Extension of Public Library Service to 
Rural Areas for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1963, had been 
approved with a Federal share of $122,837. 

Members of the Board were given a copy of the annual 
contract between the Veterans' Testing Service of the American 
Council on Education and the State Department of Education 
for the operation of an Official VTS Agency for a period of one 
year, beginning September 1, 1962. Under this contract the State 
Department of Education is authorized to administer restricted 
forms of the high school level Tests of General Educational 
Development, with Miss Ruth E. Hobbs as the agent to administer 
and safeguard the restricted test materials under the conditions 
set forth by the Veterans' Testing Service. 

The Board was informed that on August 9, 1962, the State 
Superintendent had written Governor Tawes as follows: 

Public Law 85-926, enacted by the United States Congress in 1960, 
provides fellowships for the training of instructors and directors in 
the field of education of the mentally retarded. Under Section 2 of 
this Law, the State of Maryland is entitled to two fellowships. For 
the past two years these two fellowships have been awarded and 
payments were made by the United States Government directly to 
the universities where the training was given. However, we have been 
advised that beginning with the 1962-63 academic year, these fellow- 
ship grants can be made only where payment is made by the State 
educational agency, which is the Maryland State Department of 
Education. 

Dr. Pullen then requested permission to accept Federal funds 
for the academic year 1962-63 in the amount of $11,800 to be 
paid out to universities for two fellowships for training in special 
education and to accept additional funds under this program. 
Such authorization was given as of August, 1962. 



46 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



SPECIAL MEETING— SEPTEMBER 19, 1962 

Action of the State Board included: 

Amended Bylaw 74, ratio of high school teachers to pupils 
enrolled, by the addition of the following: 

"And, in addition, each high school offering driver education shall 
be allowed additional teachers for this purpose on the basis of one 
for the equivalent of each 125 pupils or fraction thereof enrolled in 
thirty hours of classroom instruction and six hours behind-the-wheel 
instruction; and 

"That it is the intent of the State Board of Education that any 
driver education program offered by any high school in the State shall 
not interfere with the regular program of the school, as expressed 
in Subsection (8) of Section 212 of Article 77 of The Annotated Code 
of Maryland, 1957 edition." 

Authorized the State Department of Education, beginning 
September 1, 1962, to ascertain the total number of different 
students enrolled in driver education in each of the subdivisions 
along with the amount of instruction time in class and behind- 
the-wheel for each student, calculate the equivalent number of 
students receiving 30 hours of classroom instruction and six 
hours behind-the-wheel instruction, and apportion and distribute 
the funds available among the subdivisions on the basis of this 
equivalent number of students. This action was in accordance 
with legislation enacted by the Maryland General Assembly in 
1961. 

Approved revision of Bylaw 77, Requirements for Certi- 
ficates for Administrators, Supervisors, and Teachers. This re- 
vision, approved by the local Superintendents' Committee on 
Certification was needed to clarify or change certain sections 
of the new basic certification requirements, designated as Bylaw 
77, adopted by the State Board of Education on May 31, 1961. 

Repealed and re-enacted Bylaw 14, Teachers Contracts, to 
be effective September 19, 1962. 

Before this action Mr. Boston reported that the Emergency 
Teachers' Contract contained in Bylaw 14 is now obsolete be- 
cause the Emergency Certificate has been replaced under Bylaw 
77 by the Provisional Certificate. This necessitated some changes 
in the wording of Bylaw 14 and a new contract form. A new 
contract was written by the Assistant Attorney General and 
approved by the Superintendents' Committee on Certification. 

Approved the recommendation of the Attorney General's 
office concerning the request of school superintendents for per- 
mission for a teacher who becomes 70 years of age to continue 
until the end of a school year. The recommendation was that the 
Board not take any action at this time to set a cut-off date. This 
would take away the Board's discretionary power, and, therefore, 
the Board should continue to rule on the merits of each case. 
Although generally the Board does not approve the practice of 
continuing a teacher in service when he becomes 70 so soon after 
the beginning of the school year, it could be that the 70-year-old 
teacher would be far superior to an available replacement. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



47 



The Board also requested the State Superintendent to convey 
to the school superintendents in writing the Board's approval 
of the recommendation of the Assistant Attorney General and 
position that this privilege should be exercised infrequently and 
only for the best of reasons. 

Approved the report, Polices and Programs, Public Sec- 
ondary Education in Maryland, prepared by the State Committee 
to Study Secondary School Education in Maryland. 

Before this action Dr. Zimmerman reviewed the develop- 
ment of this report. He reminded the Board that, at the sug- 
gestion of the school superintendents, the State Superintendent 
had appointed a State Committee to Study Secondary School 
Education in Maryland. This study was a cooperative enterprise 
by the local school systems and the State Department of Educa- 
tion. Consultants were brought in from time to time. The first 
draft of the report was sent out to the local school systems a 
year ago and was studied carefully by the administrative staff, 
principals, and teachers in each of the twenty-four school sys- 
tems. The discussions at the Conference on Secondary Education 
in the spring of 1962 were centered around suggestions from the 
local school systems, and the report was then revised in accord- 
ance with the suggestions of the greatest importance. Members 
of the Board were given copies of the tentative edition a year 
ago, and the revised edition of Policies and Programs, Public 
Secondary Education in Maryland was presented to the members 
of the Board by Mr. Huffington at the special meeting on July 
17, 1962. The State Superintendent had studied the report care- 
fully, had conferred with the Deputy State Superintendent, the 
Director of Instruction, and others, and had approved the report 
and recommended acceptance by the Board. Dr. Zimmerman 
stated that the report would be of great help to the local school 
systems because it sets forth the position of the State with re- 
gard to secondary education. A document like this cannot be all 
inclusive, and the standards for high schools will come before 
the Board at a later date. The local school systems will use this 
document in planning the reorganization of the curriculum in 
the local school systems. Mr. Thomas W. Pyles, Supervisor of 
High Schools, added that he had used the report in his work 
with the high schools and feels it is about as thorough a study 
of this type as the State can make and come to as much agree- 
ment as has been reached. 

Approved in principle the report, "A Proposal for the Opera- 
tion of a Program for the Better Utilization of the Professional 
Talent in the Schools and Colleges of Maryland," prepared by 
Mr. T. Wilson Cahall, and authorized the State Superintendent 
of Schools to prepare on the basis of that report a proposal to 
be made to the Fund for the Advancement of Education of the 
Ford Foundation for a grant to carry out the projects suggested. 

Authorized the State Superintendent to take up with the 
Legislative Council and the Governor the proposal that a sum- 



48 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



mer program be built into the over-all salary structure for 
teachers. 

As the Board of Trustees of the State Teachers Colleges, 
approved the report of the Commission for the Expansion of 
Public Higher Education in Maryland and recommended its 
adoption. 

The Commission for the Expansion of Public Higher Edu- 
cation in Maryland (often called the Curlett Commission) was 
appointed by the Governor in 1961, following passage of a resolu- 
tion by the 1961 Session of the Maryland General Assembly com- 
posed of me^ibers of the Legislature, educators, and citizens of 
the State engaged in various professions, the Commission over 
this period had studied carefully the situation with respect to 
higher education in Maryland. (See section on Division of Cer- 
tification and Accreditation for further details.) 

Approved the report, "Public Adult Education," prepared 
by the State Committee on Adult Education. 

Before this action. Dr. Geneva E. Flickinger, Supervisor 
of Adult Education, stated that in its report the committee tried 
to show what it considers the need for adult education in this 
State and developed a philosophy which indicates that in order 
to govern themselves, improve social relations, raise the standard 
of living, and enrich the cultural heritage, adults must continue 
to learn throughout life. The over-all objective of any program 
of adult education is to provide people with the desire and the 
opportunity to continue learning and to guide learning itself 
towards specific objectives. Adult education is necessary to the 
full development of Maryland's human resources. While Mary- 
land has a planned program of adult education, it is not now 
adequate to the task. Public and nonpublic facilities reach only 
a small number of adults. The public school system has the re- 
sponsibility of examining the total adult education offerings 
available in a community, evaluating their capacity to serve all 
the adults, and providing whatever program is needed to make 
adult education comprehensive and attractive to the adults. The 
fourteen recommendations of the State Committee were made 
in the light of the committee's findings concerning the existing 
programs of adult education and the long-term needs in Maryland. 

Dr. Pullen added that his feeling about education is that 
the greatest advances and the greatest good are going to come 
from the work done in preschool and adult education. In the 
preschool program educators are going to learn much more about 
the learning process. In the adult education program adults are 
going to be aroused and become more interested in the education 
of their children. In addition, corporations are asking the school 
system to work with them in providing greater opportunities for 
their employees. Dr. Zimmerman pointed out that two years ago 
when Baltimore City removed, in part, public support of its 
adult education program, enrollments dropped sharply; those 



Maryland State Department of Education 



49 



administering the program felt the people they wanted most to 
reach were deprived of an opportunity to continue their learning. 

Approved the report, Educating the Highly Able, prepared 
by the State Committee on Education of the Superior and Gifted. 

Before this action Dr. Flickinger stated that much has been 
done in the way of improvement of the program for the highly 
able in the past four or five years and that this document should 
help to do a great deal more. Dr. Zimmerman added that one 
of the big contributions of this report is that it should make the 
teachers across the State conscious of the existence of these 
youngsters and how to identify them. 

November 28, 1962 
Action of the State Board included: 

Approved staff changes and appointments in the State 
Department of Education which included: 

Clarence E. Baseman Educational Supervisor of Adult 

Education, effective January 
2, 1963 

Richard K. McKay From Educational Supervisor of 

Adult Education to Educa- 
tional Supervisor of Instruc- 
tion (Research) , effective Jan- 
uary 1, 1963 

John H. Naylor, Jr Assistant Supervisor of Finance, 

effective November 14, 1962 

Carroll L. Speck From Assistant Supervisor of Cer- 
tification to Assistant Super- 
visor of Accreditation, effec- 
tive January 1, 1963 

Repealed Bylaw 72 and that part of Bylaw 65 which reads 
as follows: *'and they shall not engage in any other gainful oc- 
cupation while filling their respective positions." 

Before taking this action, Dr. Zimmerman reported to the 
Board that for a number of years the school superintendents of 
the State have been raising questions about Bylaw 65, Accom- 
modations for and duties of county professional assistants, and 
Bylaw 72, Principals not to engage in other gainful occupations. 
They feel it is almost impossible to police the teaching profession 
and find out whether or not teachers are accepting positions to 
teach in evening schools, extension courses, and the like. In 
addition, they all feel such teaching is a worthwhile experience 
for an individual teacher to have. Consequently, the school super- 
intendents recommended that the bylaws, which now affect only 
secondary school principals and central office supervisors, should 
be repealed and that the approval or disapproval of additional 
employment should be left up to the local boards of education. 

Approved the Aid to Education budget requests in the 
amount of $115,128,992, making a total Public School Budget 



50 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



of $126,566,386 for 1963-64 as well as requests for assistance 
to State-aided institutions in the amount of $2,123,750 and 
$15,000 for Employment of the Handicapped. 

Adopted three new sections to be added to Bylaw 77 and 
to be entitled ''Certification in Special Areas," Part F, Sections 
41, 42, and 43. See Board Minutes of September 19, 1962, for 
earlier action relating to Bylaw 77 and section on Division of 
Certification and Accreditation for further details. 

Approved the recommendation by the presidents of the 
State teachers colleges and the State Superintendent that when 
the names of the State teachers colleges are changed to State 
colleges the name of the town should be listed first ; for example, 
Towson State College rather than State College at Towson. 

The Board was advised that on October 23, 1962, the Board 
of Public Works had approved the request to name the new 
student union-dining hall at Coppin State Teachers College in 
honor of Governor J. Millard Tawes. Recommendation for this 
action from faculty and administrative officers at Coppin had 
been approved by the State Board of Trustees of the Teachers 
Colleges. 

State Board committee assignments for 1962-63 were an- 
nounced as follows: 

State Department of Education — Mrs. J. Wilmer Cronin; 
Public Schools — Mr. C. William Hetzer; Higher Education — Mr. 
William L. Wilson; Special Programs — Dr. Dwight 0. W. 
Holmes; Public Libraries — Mr. Richard Schifter; Advanced 
Planning — Mrs. Kenneth S. Cole. 

Dr. Zimmerman reported that the Planning Committee for 
the Maryland Conference on Education, appointed by the State 
Superintendent of Schools, had arranged for the Fifth Maryland 
Conference on Education to be held on Thursday and Friday, 
January 31 and February 1, 1963, in Baltimore. The theme for 
the conference will be ''Challenges and Opportunities in Public 
Education in Maryland during the Sixties.*' Four major groups 
would discuss: Educational Television, Higher Education, Fi- 
nancing Public Education, and Education for All Youth. 

The Board was informed that the following publications 
had recently been issued by the State Department of Education : 

Maryland Nonpublic Academic Schools Approved by the 
State Superintendent of Schools, June 30, 1962 

Maryland Nonpublic Schools Offering Instruction in Spec- 
ialized Areas Approved by the State Superintendent of Schools, 
June 30, 1962 

The Board was advised of a series of Executive Orders from 
the Governor to appropriate State Departments to increase their 
efforts to curtail accidents on the State's highways. The Governor 
also requested the State Board of Education to advise the local 
boards of education of the paramount importance of driver train- 
ing so that the future drivers of Maryland may be well versed 
in traffic safety procedures. The Governor also announced that 



Maryland State Department of EIducation 



51 



he has established a Special Advisory Committee of State officials 
consisting of the Superintendent of the State Police, the 
Chairman-Director of the State Roads Commission, the Com- 
missioner of Motor Vehicles, the Director of the Governor's 
Traffic Safety Commission, a representative of the State Depart- 
ment of Education, and a member of his staff. The State Super- 
intendent advised the Governor regarding action of the State 
Board of Education on September 19, 1962, in adopting two 
resolutions to strengthen the support of driver education in the 
local school systems. Dr. Pullen also assured the Governor **of 
the Board's continuing concern over the matter of traffic safety 
and the importance of a strong program of driver education in 
promoting it." 

Members of the Board were informed that the following 
surveys about modern foreign language teaching in Maryland 
are being made under the direction of the Division of Research 
and Development: 

Survey of Modern Foreign Language Teachers 
in Secondary Schools 

The United States Office of Education arranged with the 
Modern Language Association of America to work with the state 
departments of education throughout the country in making a 
survey of modern foreign language teachers in secondary schools. 
The purpose of the survey was to determine teaching loads, 
academic preparation, subsequent participation in foreign lan- 
guage study, and other professional growth in their field. Each 
foreign language teacher in the public and nonpublic schools 
was requested to fill out a questionnaire and forward it to the 
State Department of Education for processing on electronic data 
processing equipment. School principals and local superintendents 
were not requested to do any computing or processing. 

Cooperative State Survey of Audio and Visual Equipment Used 
in Modern Foreign Language Instruction in Secondary Schools 

All states used the same questionnaire to obtain data on a 
school basis on audio and visual equipment for modern foreign 
language instruction. Maryland data were forwarded to the 
State Department of Education for computing, processing, and 
analyzing. 

Members of the Board were given copies of the second An- 
nual Report of the Enoch Pratt Free Library Services supplied 
to libraries in the State by contract with the State Department 
of Education for the year July 1, 1961, to June 30, 1962, and 
of correspondence between Mr. Robert S. Ake, Assistant Director 
of the Enoch Pratt Free Library, and Dr. Pullen. Mr. Ake pointed 
out: 'The second year of Contract Services showed impressive 
increases in book and film use for almost every county in the 
state, particularly in those counties which began county-wide 
library service during the last year. We were also pleased to 



52 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



note a steady increase in the number of reference and informa- 
tional questions handled by the County Services Department. 
The county library administrators made a number of suggestions 
during the last year for additional services to be provided by 
Contract. These are summarized in our Report. Installation of 
teletype service, particularly, would do much to make the facili- 
ties of the Pratt Library more accessible to all Maryland 
residents." 

Members of the Board received copies of correspondence 
between the Governor and the State Superintendent of Schools 
concerning a grant of $10,845 awarded the Maryland State De- 
partment of Education by the Department of Health, Education, 
and Welfare under Public Law 565 for the purpose of conducting 
a research and development project in the Division of Vocational 
Rehabilitation. In his letter of August 29, 1962, to Governor 
Tawes, Dr. Pullen stated: 'The purpose of the project is to 
determine the effectiveness of unstructured group counseling in 
developing in disabled persons insight and positive attitudes. At 
the present time approximately twenty per cent of our rehabili- 
tation cases, which have completed all of the normal rehabilita- 
tion services, are still unable to adjust to employment because 
of personality problems. One of the counselors has conducted 
limited experiments using group therapy to bring about the ad- 
justment of these people. He has had remarkable success. The 
Federal Government is very much interested in this program 
and believes that through this grant we may find a way to bring 
about employment adjustment for a great majority of this twenty 
per cent who now continue to remain unemployable." Dr. Pullen 
then requested permission to accept the grant, stating that ''the 
required State share of the project is ten per cent of the cost 
of $1,200," which sum can be made available from the Case 
Service appropriation for 1963. The Governor replied on Sep- 
tember 18 that he was pleased to approve the request "with the 
understanding that acceptance of this grant will not involve the 
employment of any additional full-time personnel." 

Mr. Robert C. Thompson, Assistant State Superintendent 
in Vocational Rehabilitation, reported that this grant had enabled 
him to assign three counselors, all of whom have volunteered to 
work after hours, to this project, which he feels has national 
implications. 

At Dr. Pullen's request, Mr. James R. Reid, Director of 
Vocational Education, reported that approval had been received 
from both the Department of Labor and the Department of 
Health, Education, and Welfare for the operation of the follow- 
ing courses under the Manpower Development and Training Act 



of 1962: 



Auto Mechanics 

Machine Tool Operation 
Mechanical Draftsmen ... 
Electronic Technicians ... 



,$36,130 
, 55,600 
, 10,490 
, 44,500 



Maryland State Department of E^ducation 



53 



These programs started in Baltimore City on October 14, 
1962, with an initial enrollment of 106 trainees. The following 
additional courses have been approved but classes have not yet 
started : 

Licensed Practical Nursing 
Architectural Drafting 
Topographical Drafting 
Electrical Drafting 

The beginning of these classes is dependent upon the avail- 
ability of trainees. 

Mr. Reid stated further that Maryland was one of the first 
states to get started on this program of manpower training and 
that he will keep the Board informed of the progess being made. 
Responsibility for selection, referral, and placement of trainees 
under this program, as well as the determination of need of 
training, rests with the Department of Labor. If after making 
surveys it is determined that there is a need for a particular 
kind of progi^am, the State Department of Education is requested 
to set up the program. The Department of Labor, through the 
State Department of Employment Security, screens available 
applicants by giving necessary tests and refers the individuals 
to the educational system for training. 

Approval had been received for an additional course under 
the Area Redevelopment Act, Public Law 87-27, in machine tool 
operation in Cumberland, with a budget of $16,205. This class 
started on November 26, 1962, with an enrollment of 25 persons. 

Members of the Board received copies of a letter from Gov- 
ernor Tawes to the State Superintendent of Schools, dated Sep- 
tember 13, 1962, in which Governor Tawes designated the State 
Board of Education to be the State Educational Television 
Agency and established the Educational Television Advisory 
Committee as a working committee to represent the broad 
educational-cultural interests of the State. The Governor also 
stated that he was ''asking the State Department of Education, 
the University of Maryland, the Baltimore City Department of 
Education, the Maryland Library Association, and the Maryland- 
D.C. Broadcasters Association to designate a representative to 
serve on the (Advisory) Commission" and was asking ''that 
these members at their first meeting recommend to the State 
Board of Education a representative of the non-public institu- 
tions of higher learning, and a representative of the cultural 
institutions of Maryland to serve as members of the Advisory 
Committee." He charged the Advisory Committee with the fol- 
lowing functions: 

1. To study and report upon the educational and cultural appli- 
cations of television in the State of Maryland. The report shall 
include recommendations for the coordinated development of 
educational television in Maryland. 

2. To establish criteria for appraising the scope of optimal pro- 
gramming, and the technical standards of operation. 



54 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



3. To recommend the assignment of educational television chan- 
nels in the State of Maryland. Requests for licensure of edu- 
cational channels or for Federal assistance shall be referred 
to this committee for evaluation and recommendation. 

4. To review annually the program reports submitted to it by 
the operating units. These reviews should be the source of 
continual recommendations for the expansion and refinement 
of educational television in the State. 

5. To develop procedures for the effective coordination of edu- 
cational television throughout the State, both open and closed 
circuit. 

Dr. Dorn, at Dr. Pullen's request, reported that the five 
organized groups designated by the Governor to serve on the Ad- 
visory Committee had appointed the following representatives: 

University of Maryland 
Dr. Frank Bentz, Jr. 
Assistant to the President 

Baltimore City Public Schools 
Mr. Wilmer V. Bell 
Director, Adult Education 

Maryland-D.C. Broadcasters Association 
Mr. Herbert Cahan 
General Manager, WJZ-TV 

Maryland Library Association 
Miss Elizabeth Gross 
Area Librarian 

Prince George's County Memorial Library 

Maryland State Department of Education 

Dr. Wesley N. Dom 

Director of Research and Development 

These representatives have nominated two persons for 
recommendation to the State Board as the additional representa- 
tives on the Advisory Committee. Dr. Pullen stated that he will 
submit the names of the two additional representatives to the 
Board directly at one of its special meetings or by poll as soon 
as it can be determined whether or not they will be able to serve. 

Dr. Dorn pointed out that, although the Advisory Committee 
is not fully constituted, the five members presently appointed 
felt there were certain recommendations so essential to the de- 
velopment of educational television in Maryland that they should 
be brought to the attention of the Board immediately. These 
recommendations are that a professional person having broad 
planning and management responsibilities for the development 
and operation of educational television in the State be employed 
with necessary office operating funds ; that an engineering sur- 
vey be made for establishing State-wide facility requirements; 
that specialized legal assistance be provided for preparing appli- 
cations to the Federal Communications Commission ; and that 
consultant services be provided to the State Educational Tele- 
vision Agency and Advisory Committee. The total estimated 
cost for the above for the first year was given as $65,000. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



55 



Dr. Dorn made the following report on developments in 
connection with the educational television program in general: 

The 87th Congress adjourned without appropriating funds 
to implement the legislation authorizing Federal assistance for 
the construction of open-circuit television stations. When the 
new Congress convenes, it is expected that legislation will be 
introduced so that a supplementary appropriation for educational 
television might be made available before the end of the 1963 
fiscal year. 

The amount of funds considered by the House for appropria- 
tion during 1963 was two million dollars. Although rules and 
regulations were not published to implement this proposed al- 
location, it seems that no state would have received more than 
$175,000 from the proposed initial appropriation. This would 
have permitted a state to acquire only one television station with 
matching funds. 

The Federal Communications Commission has proposed a 
new class of service to promote educational television by using 
channels in the 1,990-2,110 megacycle or 2,500-2,690 megacycle 
band to transmit instructional and cultural material to schools 
and other selected receiving locations. Since these frequencies 
are not in the range that can be received on ordinary television 
sets, their use would, in effect, result in a closed-circuit type of 
transmission to only those schools or other locations which had 
appropriate converter receivers. Simultaneous telecasts could be 
transmitted by this method to serve the same purpose as that 
now served by transmitting lessons over coaxial cable in Wash- 
ington County. 

A demonstration of this "on-air closed-circuit" transmission 
at Bethpage, New York, on June 14, 1962, has demonstrated 
that this method of transmission is technologically feasible, and 
there is every evidence that this method of transmission will 
in many cases cost considerably less than the coaxial cable type 
of transmission, especially in areas where the terrain is relatively 
level. 

Since this 2,000 megacycle transmission band is not present- 
ly assigned to schools, and since nonschool groups are also inter- 
ested in the use of these frequencies, it is important that 
educators express their interests in this matter. The State Super- 
intendent of Schools has therefore written two letters to the 
Acting Secretary of the Federal Communications Commission, 
expressing an interest in the use of these frequencies. The first 
letter expressed a general interest; the second letter expressed 
concern that the frequencies proposed for school purposes not 
be pre-empted by other interested groups. 

Dr. Dorn added that the allocation to education of this new 
group of channels in the 2,000 megacycle transmission band is 
still under consideration by the Federal Communications Com- 
mission and that, if they are made available for educational use, 
it will considerably reduce the cost figures. He reported also that 



56 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



the Federal Communications Commission had granted an addi- 
tional channel to Salisbury, Maryland, but noted that other 
channels are available to the State Department of Education for 
educational television. 

In answer to a question on support from the Council of Chief 
State School Officers and the National School Board Association, 
Dr. Pullen stated that he had taken up the matter with the 
Council of Chief State School Officers at its recent meeting in 
Miami and he thinks that group will contact the Federal Com- 
munications Commission. 

The State Superintendent was requested to write a letter 
to the National School Board Association suggesting that the 
organization communicate with the Federal Communications 
Commission to indicate its interest in the 2,000 megacycle trans- 
mission band for use of schools. 

Special Meeting— February 5, 1963 

The Board considered the report on ''Maryland Legislation 
Affecting Education." Included in the bills reviewed by Dr. David 
W. Zimmerman and Dr. John L. Carnochan, Jr. were those re- 
lating to higher education in Maryland creating a Board of 
Trustees of the State Colleges to supervise and control the 
maintenance and operation of the public colleges of the State, 
and other bills relating to scholarships and teachers' retirement. 

The Board voted to convey to the Board of Trustees of the 
State Teachers' Retirement System its attitude in favoring a 
policy which would permit teachers who are now on ten-month 
contracts and who find professional employment with the local 
school systems during the summer to receive credit toward their 
retirement. 

As the Board of Trustees of the State Teachers Colleges 
adopted the following regulations : 

Students who withdraw after two weeks but prior to the middle 
of the semester will be refunded one-half of the payments for tuition, 
board, and room. 

Students who withdraw after midsemester will receive no refund 
for tuition, board, and room. 

Applicants who have graduated from nonaccredited high schools 
may be admitted as special students providing their scholastic qualifi- 
cations are satisfactory, with the understanding that they will be 
considered as candidates for a degree when they have passed the high 
school equivalence examination or have completed satisfactorily one 
year of college work at the college. 

Revised the policy with regard to transcript records relating to 
deferment and failure to fulfill the pledge to teach to read as follows: 

"The presidents are authorized to enter on the transcripts of 
those graduates unable to present valid reasons for failing to fulfill 
the pledge to teach the following statement: 'Failed to fulfill the 
pledge to teach two years in the State of Maryland in exchange for 
the elimination of tuition charges.' " 

The Board reviewed the draft of ''Rules and Regulations 
of the Board of Trustees of the Maryland State Teachers Col- 
leges" presented at the meeting on November 28, 1962. Mr. James 



Maryland State Department of Education 



57 



P. Garland, Assistant Attorney General, explained that basically, 
the proposal is that the existing rules and regulations should 
be codified and put into a readily obtainable and easily referred 
to single volume. The draft under consideration contains the 
bylaws of the Board of Trustees ; the rules or regulations form- 
ally adopted but never printed; and those rules and regulations 
which have been traditionally recognized but never formally 
adopted. Therefore, adoption of these rules in total form would 
mean the adoption of the whole system as the rules and regula- 
tions of the Board of Trustees. Mr. Garland suggested that these 
rules and regulations should be adopted as expeditiously as pos- 
sible, because this publication would put the policies and practices 
of the Board of Trustees in a form in which the new Board of 
Trustees of the State Colleges, as set up under Senate Bill No. 9, 
can work with them. Although adopted by this Board, they will 
carry over to the new Board. 

February 27, 1963 
Action of the Board included: 

Approved staff changes in the State Department of Edu- 
cation which included : 

Charles C. Conlon, Jr From Assistant Supervisor of 

Trade Schools to Educational 
Supervisor of Accreditation, 
effective January 30, 1963 

Harry M. McDonald Resignation as Educational Super- 
visor of Agriculture, effective 
August 31, 1963 

John Clay Metzger Assistant Supervisor of Accredita- 
tion, effective February 13, 
1963 

Raymond G. Pluemer Educational Supervisor of Man- 
power Development and Train- 
ing, effective March 1, 1963 

Carroll L. Speck From Assistant Supervisor of Ac- 
creditation to Educational 
Supervisor of Accreditation, 
effective January 30, 1963 

Authorized the Allegany Community College to grant the 
Associate in Arts degree, beginning June, 1963. 

Authorized the Anne Arundel Community College to grant 
the Associate in Art degree, beginning June, 1963. 

Both of the above community colleges began operation in 
September, 1961, with the understanding that final approval and 
the right to grant the Associate in Arts degree would be given 
by the State Board of Education after a period of satisfactory 
operation. 

Authorized the Baltimore Hebrew College to grant the de- 
grees of Bachelor of Hebrew Literature and Bachelor of Religious 



58 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



Education and the following certificates and diplomas : Teacher 
Diploma (for Jewish schools) ; Teacher Certificate (for Jewish 
schools) ; Academic Diploma ; and Women's Institute Certificate, 
effective as of February 27, 1963. 

Approved the general form to be used by the community 
colleges of Maryland in the issuance of the Associate in Arts 
degree diploma. 

Approved an agreement with the Maryland Workshop for 
the Blind in order that the program of home teaching of blind 
persons may be refined to meet present-day needs. 

As the Board of Trustees of the State Teachers Colleges: 

Approved the 1965-69 capital improvements budget in the 
amount of $28,936,200, which includes subbudget totals for each 
of the five State teachers colleges as follows: 

Bowie $ 3,305,000 

Frostburg 11,149,200 



Authorized the introduction of a summer school program at 
the State Teachers College at Bowie beginning in June, 1963. 

Authorized the introduction of a summer school program 
at Coppin State Teachers College beginning in June, 1963. 

Dr. Earle T. Hawkins, President of the State Teachers Col- 
lege at Towson, reported that a committee of the presidents is 
preparing a report on a ten-year development program for the 
State teachers colleges. 

Dr. Pullen reported that he had had a conference with Gov- 
ernor J. Millard Tawes concerning additional land for the State 
Teachers College at Towson. The purchases of additional land 
has also been recommended for Coppin, Frostburg, and Salisbury 
State teachers colleges. Dr. Pullen stated that it is highly impor- 
tant that the Board of Trustees secure this additional land for 
the future growth of these colleges. 

Members of the Board were informed that the following 
publications had been issued by the State Department of Edu- 
cation since the November meeting of the Board. 

Directory of School Officials in State of Maryland, 1962-63, 
October, 1962. 

Educating the Highly Able, Maryland School Bulletin, Volume 
XXXIX, Number 1, December, 1962. 

Major Speeches delivered at the Maryland Conference on Sec- 
ondary Education, March 22 and 23, 1962, and Maryland Con- 
ference on Elementary Education, April 12 and 13, 1962. 



Ninety -fifth Annical Report of the State Board of Education 

Showing- Condition of the Public Schools of Maryland for the 

Year Ending June 30, 1961. 
Standards for Equipment for Science and Mathematics Programs, 

National Defense Education Act, Title III. Revised September, 

1962. 

1962 Supplement to Audiovisual Catalog, 1961, 



Salisbury 
Towson .. 
Coppin .. 



3,023,000 
8,769,000 
2,690,000 



Maryland State Department of Education 



59 



Members of the Board were informed that the following 
opinions of the Attorney General had been received since the 
November Board meeting. Copies of these opinions also have 
been sent to the members of the Board. 

November 30, 1962, RE: Authority of any State agency 

to the Governor to investigate conditions in 

church-sponsored private edu- 
cational institutions 

December 14, 1962 RE: Applicability of the conflict of 

interest laws of the State of 
Maryland to a situation in 
Washington County 

December 26, 1962, RE: Aid to handicapped children 

to the Director of under Section 241(b) et seq. 

Budget and Procurement of Article 77 

December 28, 1962, RE: Driver education funds 

to the Director of 
Budget and Procurement 

Members of the Board were given copies of the Maryland- 
Virginia contract for library services for the visually handi- 
capped which had been approved in principle by the State Board 
of Education on May 31, 1962, and which became effective July 
1, 1962, to continue in full force and effect until June 30, 1963. 
Thereafter it will continue in effect from year to year, unless 
either party shall notify the other in writing at least sixty days 
prior to the anniversary date of its intention to modify or termi- 
nate this agreement. The agreement may not be modified in any 
respect except by mutual consent, in writing, of the parties 
concerned. 

A report was made to the Board on the status of Educa- 
tional Television. As stated at the November, 1962, meeting of 
the Board, the representatives of the five organizations desig- 
nated by the Governor to serve on the Educational Television 
Advisory Committee held their initial meeting on October 22. 
As charged by the Governor, they recommended to the State 
Board the names of two representatives to be added to the ad- 
visory committee, one to represent the nonpublic institutions of 
higher learning and one to represent the cultural institutions of 
the State. Following approval of the Board, the State Superin- 
tendent invited Dr. Richard D. Weigle, President of St. John's 
College, to serve on the advisory committee as the representative 
of the nonpublic institutions of higher learning and Dr. Theodore 
L. Low, Director of the Department of Education of Walters 
Art Gallery, to represent the cultural institutions. Both gentle- 
men agreed to serve on the committee. 

On January 11, 1963, the Educational Television Advisory 
Committee held its first full meeting and elected Dr. Wesley N. 
Dorn chairman. The Committee reviewed the responsibilities 
with which it had been charged by the Governor in his letter of 
September 13, 1962, designating the State Board of Education 



60 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



to act as the State Educational Televis-ion Agency and creating 
the Educational Television Advisory Committee. A second meet- 
ing was held on January 25, 1963, at which time the committee 
approved recommendations to be submitted to the State Board 
for its consideration. 

Mr. Wilmer V. Bell, in the absence of Dr. Dorn, called at- 
tention to "The Development of Educational Television in Mary- 
land," the initial report and recommendations to the Maryland 
State Board of Education acting as the State Educational Tele- 
vision Agency by the Educational Television Advisory Commit- 
tee, dated February 27, 1963. He stated that certain principles 
had governed the advisory committee in making these 
recommendations : 

1. It seems generally accepted that educational television has a 
tremendous educational potential. 

2. This potential has been recognized by the Congress of the 
United States, which has authorized certain funds to augment 
the implementation of educational television facilities. 

3. There are very significant time factors involved. 

The report gives background information, present and po- 
tential uses of educational television, and recommendations for 
coordinating development of educational television in Maryland. 
These recommendations cover reserving educational television 
channels for Maryland, employing an engineering firm to make 
a survey to determine the optimum manner in which State-wide 
educational television coverage may be obtained, obtaining the 
services of a thoroughly qualified educational television director 
to serve as a member of the staff of the State Department of 
Education, establishing a State educational television station 
in the Baltimore area as the initial step in a State-wide system, 
establishing programming to provide for the many diverse types 
of educational television applications designed to meet the edu- 
cational and cultural needs of the State, establishing a committee 
of local school superintendents or their representatives to plan 
cooperatively with the State Department of Education the kinds 
of in-school programs that will be most effective and useful in 
meeting educational needs throughout the State, providing for 
the cooperative utilization of the educational programs and pro- 
duction facilities at Hagerstown and at the University of Mary- 
land and other institutions of higher education where closed- 
circuit telecasting is now available, and requesting the Legislature 
to provide an estimated $175,000 in the 1963-64 budget to imple- 
ment the preceding recommendations. 

On the basis of discussions of lay groups such as the Mary- 
land Committee on Educational Television, the resolutions of 
citizens' organizations, and the preliminary recommendations 
of the Educational Television Advisory Committee, Dr. Pullen 
felt that it was essential for the State to make funds available 
for an engineering survey and for program planning before 
any decisions could be made as to the extent and nature of State 



Maryland State Department of Education 



61 



participation in the development of educational television. Mem- 
bers of the Board were given copies of Dr. Pullen's letter to the 
Governor, dated February 15, 1963, in which a basic amount of 
$50,000 was requested. 

The Board voted to approve Dr. Pullen's letter of February 
15, 1963, to Governor Tawes and have the matter resubmitted 
to the Board before any recommendation is made to the Legis- 
lature on Educational Television. During the discussion it was 
pointed out that Maryland is the only large metropolitan area 
along the East Coast that does not now have educational 
television. 

Members of the Board were given copies of a report on the 
1962 Teacher Education Scholarship Program showing a total 
of 89 scholarships awarded for the school year 1962-63. Four 
hundred offers had to be made to gain these acceptances. 

The State Superintendent reported that the committee which 
he had appointed to consider the need for a graduate library 
school in Maryland submitted its report, a copy of which was 
given each member of the Board, on October 25, 1962. Following 
a meeting with the committee on the implementation of the 
recommendations in the report, on January 8, 1963, the State 
Superintendent sent a copy to Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, President 
of the University of Maryland, with a request for a conference 
after he had studied the report. Dr. Elkins met with Dr. Pullen, 
Mr. Edwin Castagna, Director of Enoch Pratt Free Library 
and chairman of the State committee, and members of that com- 
mittee on February 8 to discuss the recommendations. Dr. Pullen 
added that there seemed to be a great deal of interest but that 
he was not empowered to make any further report at this time. 
However, according to a newspaper account, the faculty senate 
at the University of Maryland had recently approved in principle 
the establishment of a graduate library school, but the matter 
has not yet gone to the Board of Regents. 

Members of the Board had been sent copies of a ''Progress 
Report on the Elementary School Study." The State Committee 
to Study the Elementary School Program was appointed by the 
State Superintendent of Schools in May, 1961. This committee, 
under the chairmanship of Dr. Zimmerman, with Mrs. Dorsey 
as secretary, is composed of representatives from all the local 
school systems in the State, as well as from the State Department 
of Education. Following the study of the secondary school pro- 
gram it was felt by many administrators and supervisors 
throughout the State that a similar study of the elementary 
school would be most appropriate. Such a study could form a 
central reference point for the local school systems in revising 
and determining elementary school policy and procedures, 
especially with respect to the major areas of curriculum, organiz- 
ing and staffing the elementary school, and using newer media 
for learning. 

Last year the efforts of the State-wide committee were 



62 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



directed chiefly to the following topics: Philosophy and Goals 
of the Elementary Schools, Factors Influencing Elementary Edu- 
cation, Organization of the Elementary School, Staffing the 
Elementary School, Meeting Varied Needs of Children through 
Appropriate Services, Relationships with Parents and the Com- 
munity, Providing an Effective Environment for Learning, and 
Evaluating the Work of the School. This year the emphasis is 
on a second major section of the study. The Program of the 
Elementary School. Subcommittees have been organized and are 
to work on objectives, promising practices, and scope in various 
subject areas. A third section of the study, Some Present Chal- 
lenges, will be considered later. 

The study has the support of the school superintendents 
of Maryland, who feel that supervisors and principals of ele- 
mentary schools should be alert to needed and desirable changes 
which can be made to enable the elementary school to provide 
the best possible program. The study, before its conclusion, will 
involve almost all supervisors of elementary schools, a large 
number of elementary school principals, and many classroom 
teachers. 

Mrs. Grace A. Dorsey, Assistant Director of Instruction, 
stated that she hopes the committee will be able to develop a 
policy bulletin which can be used by the various local school 
systems on a basis for making decisions. 

Members of the Board were also given copies of a progress 
report of the State Committee on High School Standards. In 
February, 1961, a State-wide committee was appointed by the 
State Superintendent of Schools for the purpose of revising 
those portions of the 1952 ''School Administrative Manual" per- 
taining to high school principles and standards. It was indicated 
that basic guidance for this project would be drawn from the 
recently completed study, Policies and Programs, Public Sec- 
ondary Education in Maryland. Included on the active committee 
membership are two local superintendents, four local unit staff 
members, four high school principals, and three members of 
the staff of the State Department of Education. 

Consultant service in the preparation of this manual was 
obtained from Dr. David Austin, head of the Department of 
Secondary School Administration, Columbia University, and on 
a more frequent basis from Dr. Wilbur Devilbiss, President of 
the State Teachers College at Salisbury. 

Among the major recommendations thus far adopted on 
a tentative basis are provisions for a unit in health and physical 
education and an additional unit of mathematics added to the 
general education requirements for all students, raising the total 
units needed for graduation from 16 to 18; a range of four 
differentiated courses leading to diplomas labelled accordingly; 
and a special education certification to be offered to mentally- 
retarded youth who remain in approved programs of special 
education beyond age seventeen. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



63 



In its work to date, the committee has developed a deep 
respect for the complexities of its task. Two such factors have 
been ever present. One rests in the committee's belief that its 
product should go beyond the simple insurance of a minimum 
program and provide a degree of flexibility and stimulation 
conducive to growth beyond that minimum. The other lies in 
the need to resolve acceptably every point in terms of what is 
deemed both educationally sound and currently practical. 

Mr. Paul E. Huffington, Director of Instruction, reported 
that the committee had explored at length the recommendations 
of Dr. James B. Conant, Dr. R. Freeman Butts, and others. The 
committee has not adopted the gradation of programs suggested 
by Dr. Butts. Maryland will still rank among the very few states 
in the United States having the highest number of units required 
for graduation. The study of the class of 1958 showed that the 
median number of academic units taken then was 18 ; the average 
now is between 21 and 22 units. Mr. Huffington added that he 
did not believe the recommendations of this committee would 
do any injustice to the students. The report will be designed 
with the needs of all kinds of students in mind. There will be 
a minimum of 18 units required for graduation. 

May 29, 1963 

In the annual election of officers of the State Board of 
Education, Mr. Jerome Framptom, Jr., was re-elected president. 
Mr. William L. Wilson, a member of the State Board since May, 
1960, was elected vice-president, to succeed Mrs. Kenneth S. Cole. 

Mr. Framptom announced that Governor J. Millard Tawes 
had appointed Mrs. William F. Robie, Forest Heights, Maryland, 
as a member of the State Board of Education for a seven-year 
term, replacing Mr. Richard Schifter whose term expired May 6, 
1963. Included in her many activities which have shown her 
interest in children is her background of expeiience in her work 
with the Maryland Congress of Parents and Teachers. 

Announcement was then made of the reappointment of 
Mr. Schifter to serve the six remaining years of Mrs. Kenneth 
S. Cole's unexpired term, Mrs. Cole having recently resigned 
as a member of the State Board. 

The Board adopted the following resolution on Mrs. Cole's 
resignation : 

Resolution on Mrs. Kenneth S, Cole 

The State Board of Education wishes to express its regret upon 
the resignation of Mrs. Kenneth S. Cole as a member of the Board 
and as its vice-president. Mrs. Cole has been diligent in carrying out 
her duties as a member of the Board. The Board wishes to extend its 
appreciation to her for her service and contributions to public edu- 
cation in Maryland during the past seven years. 

Mrs. Cole was educated in California and received her law degree 
at the University of Chicago. She practiced law in Illinois for eleven 
years but discontinued practice when she came to Maryland. Later 
she joined the staff on the United States Commission on Civil Rights 



64 Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 

in a legal capacity and is at present chief of the Public Education 
Section of that Commission. Mrs. Cole has been an active member 
of the American Association of University Women, the National As- 
sociation of Parliamentarians, and Alpha Omicron Pi sorority. She 
has been active also in parent-teacher association v^ork in Montgomery 
County. 

In 1956 Mrs. Cole was appointed to the State Board of Education 
by Governor Theodore R. McKeldin and was reappointed in 1962 by 
Governor J. Millard Tawes. In May, 1961, she was elected vice-president 
of the Board and served in this position until her resignation in 
May, 1963. 

The members of the Board are grateful to Mrs. Cole for her 
efforts on behalf of public education in Maryland and wish her further 
success in her future endeavors. 

The Board was then advised that Mr. James P. Garland, 
Assistant Attorney General assigned to the State Board and the 
State Department of Education, had resigned from the office of 
the Attorney General of Maiyland and gone into private practice. 
The Board adopted the following resolution on Mr. Garland's 
services : 

Resolution on Mr. James P. Garland 

WHEREAS, Mr. James P. Garland, as Assistant Attorney Gen- 
eral, was the legal adviser to the State Board of Education and the 
Board of Trustees of the State Teachers Colleges from May 1, 1961, 
to June 4, 1963; and 

WHEREAS, Mr. Garland served these boards in this capacity 
conscientiously and well, many times beyond the call of duty; and 

WHEREAS, Mr. Garland made a careful study of the public school 
laws of this State, becoming an authority on this subject, and in- 
terpreted the law^ to the best of his knowledge and ability in the light 
of conditions prevailing at the time; and 

WHEREAS, Mr. Garland was most helpful to these two boards, 
particularly during the numerous hearings by the State Board of 
Education arising from disputes within the local school systems and 
while the rules and regulations of these two boards were being com- 
piled and revised; now, therefore, be it 

RESOLVED, That the State Board of Education and the Board 
of Trustees of the State Teachers Colleges hereby extend to Mr. 
James P. Garland their appreciation for his wisdom and understand- 
ing and for the excellent services he has rendered the public school 
system of Maryland during his association with them, and wish this 
young man well in his chosen profession where he undoubtedly has 
a very promising future. 

At the request of Dr. Pullen, representatives of the Edu- 
cational Television Advisory Committee gave a progress report 
on educational television. 

The Legislature passed a $30,000 item for ETV in the Gov- 
ernor's supplemental budget. The budget document provides that 
the funds are to be used for an engineering survey for ETV in 
the State and for related consultant services, subject to the ap- 
proval of the Board of Public Works. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



65 



The Board approved two recommendations of the ETV 
Advisory Committee: the filing of a ''petition for Rule-Making" 
with the FCC for the reservation of certain UHF channels (the 
Attorney General's office has been requested to look into this 
matter, and Mr. James P. Garland, Assistant Attorney General, 
reports that the matter is under consideration) ; and a request 
to Television Tower, Inc., relative to the possible use of a tower 
on Television Hill for ETV purposes. 

The Advisory Committee requested Mr. Cahan, President 
of Television Tower, Inc., and the Chairman, Dr. Wesley N. Dorn, 
to look into the possibility of arranging for the use of a WBAL 
tower located near Television Hill. Mr. Cahan and Dr. Dorn, on 
behalf of the Committee, learned that a commercial agency is 
in process of completing negotiations for the acquisition of the 
old WBAL tower and adjacent building. The prospective owner 
will consider leasing the facility to the State ETV Agency, at 
a reasonable rate that will reflect the fact that the Agency is 
a part of the State government and is performing a public service 
in connection with ETV. 

The prospective owner has reported orally that the tower 
could be leased for $3,500 per year for antenna purposes and 
the building for $3,500 per year for transmitter housing and 
possible studio use. The above rates are based on the assumption 
that there will be no tax charges if the State leases the property. 
The lessee would pay his own heat, electricity, maintenance, and 
insurance on the building. The building is completely wired for 
television purposes, since it was previously used by a commercial 
television station. This arrangement would constitute a saving, 
the Advisory Committee feels, when the thousands of dollars 
which might otherwise be involved in the acquisition of a tower 
and site are taken into consideration. 

The term of the proposed lease could be 20 to 25 years. A 
letter of commitment contingent upon the result of the engineer- 
ing survey and the availability of funds from the State ETV 
Agency will secure an option for approximately 90 days, at which 
time the prospective owner would like to have an executed lease. 
The lease would not become operable until a later period, 12 to 
15 months, and would be contingent upon the appropriation of 
funds for this purpose. 

The Committee feels that if it is technically feasible to use 
this site, the State ETV Agency should commit itself to an option 
for the use of these facilities, subject to the availability of funds. 
It is important to note that there are other private parties inter- 
ested in leasing this property for commercial UHF use. If an 
option is not obtained in a reasonable period of time, the State 
might have to acquire suitable facilities at greater expense at 
a later date. 

The ETV Advisory Committee requested the Chairman to 
work with the chief engineers of the three commercial television 



66 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



stations to prepare specifications for the engineering survey. 
When available, these proposed specifications will be presented 
to the Board with recommendations regarding the selection of 
qualified consultants in this field. 

In regard to an option for the use of the WBAL tower 
located near Television Hill, Dr. Pullen stated that he felt this 
would be a sensible move since the State Educational Television 
Agency would not be committed to lease the facilities but would 
be in a position to have priority on their use and could at the 
same time go ahead with its plans for an engineering survey. 

The Board approved taking an option for the use of the 
WBAL tower facilities for a period of ninety days, contingent 
upon the results of the engineering survey and the availability 
of funds. 

Members of the Board were given a copy of the Report of 
the Committee on Educational Programs for the Emotionally 
Handicapped, submitted by Dr. Arthur Lichtenstein, chairman. 
Dr. Lichtenstein and Dr. Zimmerman, at Dr. Pullen's request, 
reported that the Committee on Educational Programs for the 
Emotionally Handicapped had been appointed by the State Super- 
intendent of Schools at the request of the local superintendents 
of schools in the spring of 1960. Mental health authorities and 
school personnel report increasing evidence of emotional mal- 
adjustment on the part of school pupils. Varying causes are 
given as the reasons for this increased evidence. It is felt that 
a concerted effort is needed in order to attack the problem. 

The purpose of the committee was to study the method or 
methods which should be used in identifying emotionally dis- 
turbed pupils ; the various types of educational programs which 
are appropriate for emotionally disturbed pupils in public 
schools; the personnel necessary to operate the various types 
of educational programs adequately; the relationship which 
should be established between the school and the parents, between 
the school and the specialists, and between the school and State 
institutions ; the evaluation measures required to indicate success 
or failure; and the probable cost of these programs per pupil. 
Over the course of its three years of existence, the committee 
utilized the services of specialists in the fields of education, 
medicine, mental health, and social work. The work of the com- 
mittee progressed in two major directions: the first was the 
definition and development of a research project with the long- 
range objective of determining the effectiveness of various ap- 
proaches to the problem of working with emotionally handicapped 
children, and the second was implementation of a program of 
action in the public schools of Maryland employing, insofar as 
possible, the various approaches designated in the research proj- 
ect but stressing reasonably prompt implementation as a result 
of an opinion by the Attorney General rather than limiting so 
rigidly the criteria to be used. A questionnaire was devised by 



Maryland State Department of Education 



67 



the committee and circulated to the various localities providing 
these programs for the purpose of gathering the required in- 
formation statistically. In addition, the members of the committee 
visited as many of the programs as could be reached conveniently 
from Baltimore and reported back to the whole committee on 
the procedures and the apparent effectiveness of the programs. 
The committee presented some proposals for the implementation 
of the program, subject to review and revision by the committee. 

Dr. Pullen stated that he felt the committee had done an 
unusual job in a field that is demanding a great deal of attention 
at the present time. In the light of the opinion of the Attorney 
General to the effect that emotionally handicapped children are 
eligible for State aid on the same basis as the physically and 
mentally handicapped pupils, the Department has $145,000 in 
its 1964 budget for the program. On the completion of its work 
the committee will propose tentative standards for setting up 
such classes. 

Members of the Board were given copies of a report, ''En- 
rollment Projection for the State Colleges to 1975 as a Basis 
for Estimated Campus Expansion Needs.'* Some suggested en- 
rollment goals for the five-year period under consideration, and 
to 1975, were set forth in this report, with the intention of 
showing the probable scope of the State college expansion task 
which lies ahead. 

Members of the Board were informed of an opinion from 
the Attorney General, dated April 25, 1963, affecting the State 
teachers colleges concerning their request for a hearing on behalf 
of four faculty members at the Teachers College at Frostburg 
who were notified by the President that their appointments 
would not be renewed beyond June 30, 1963. 

Since this was the last meeting of the Board before the 
State Teachers colleges became State colleges under a new board, 
Dr. Earle T. Hawkins, President of the State Teachers College 
at Towson, on behalf of all the presidents, expressed appreciation 
to the Board of Trustees for its deep interest in and devoted 
service to the five State teachers colleges. Since this may be 
the last meeting of the Board before the colleges become State 
colleges under a new board, he stated that the presidents thought 
it appropriate at this time to express their pleasure in working 
with and associating with the members of the Board and their 
gratitude for the advice, assistance, and actions taken in further- 
ing the development of the colleges. 

Mr. Framptom thanked the presidents and assured them 
that it has been a pleasure for the members of the Board to work 
with them and that all the members of the Board will maintain 
a very active interest in these colleges. 



68 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



The President of the Board read two letters he had received 
from Dr. Pullen concerning his plans for retirement. Following 
is the second of the two letters dated May 3, 1963 : 

May 3, 1963 

Mr. Jerome Framptom, Jr., President 
State Board of Education 
Federalsburg, Maryland 

Dear Mr. Framptom: 

I should appreciate it if you would advise the State Board of 
Education at the meeting on Wednesday, May 29, 1963, of my in- 
tention to retire as State Superintendent of Schools when my present 
term ends on June 1, 1964. For the record, I should be grateful if 
you would put in the minutes of this meeting this letter and my letter 
of July 10, 1962, to you concerning my desire to take this step. 

On June 1, 1964, (D.V.) I shall have completed forty-seven 
pleasant years of teaching less one for military service. I have no 
compelling reasons for retiring except longevity of service and the 
absence of any feeling of indispensability. I am quite sure that the 
State Board will be able to secure without too much difficulty a 
competent and aggressive successor. 

My years as State Superintendent of Schools have been happy 
ones. Despite the concurrence of a world war, unusual and almost 
explosive changes in our economic and social life, and financial stress 
the public schools of Maryland during this period have maintained 
an academic balance, a professional stability, and a constant move 
in the direction of improvement. The Maryland public school system 
has always been noted for its professional approach to its problems 
and its opportunities, and I believe this has been true also of the 
State Department of Education. The professional attitude and pro- 
fessional approach, however, would be of little avail except for the 
strong and aggressive posture of the State Board of Education. 
Throughout the years it has been my privilege to serve as its executive 
officer, without exception, the members with whom I have served 
have stood squarely and unequivocally for better education for the 
children of Maryland. I could have asked for no finer support. 

The pleasures of my professional association with the State 
Board have been surpassed only by those of the personal. I am grate- 
ful for your friendship, and I shall miss you in my daily contacts. 

Very sincerely yours, 
(Signed) THOMAS G. PULLEN, JR. 

State Superintendent of Schools 

Mr. Framptom stated to the Board, "I read these letters 
with mixed emotion. I feel that Dr. Pullen has earned the kind 
of rest and relaxation that I hope will be his after he retires, 
but I know of nothing that makes me sadder than the thought 
of not having him as State Superintendent. I feel that the most 
important job the Board has to do now is that of selecting a 
State Superintendent. Dr. Pullen agrees, and it is for this reason 
that he has given us a full year's notice. I feel very strongly that 
we should very carefully survey the possibilities and interview 
many people in every part of the country in whom we might 
be interested, as this position will be particularly difficult to 
fill. In view of that, I am asking two members of the Board to 
work with me to interview and present to the Board names of 



Maryland State Department of Education 



69 



candidates that it might consider." Mr. Framptom then asked 
Mr. Wilson and Dr. Holmes to serve on this committee with him. 

Dr. Pullen replied that he did not want to make this a sad 
occasion, particularly since he has another year in office. He 
stated that the only compelling reasons for his retirement are 
the ones he gave in his letters to Mr. Framptom. He added, "1 
am quite sure you are going to get somebody better; it is in- 
evitable that we are going to have progress. I cannot tell you 
how wonderful it has been for me to be associated with you 
personally and professionally. In the main we have worked to- 
gether well, and I believe that the children of Maryland are 
better off because of the State Board of Education and the other 
lay people who were so interested in their education." 

The resignation of Mr. C. William Hetzer, member of the 
Board was announced, effective June 1, 1963. 

Members of the Board were given a list of the following 
recent publications of the State Department of Education: 

State-Approved Maryland Colleges and Universities. January, 
1963 

Laws of Maryland Relating to Public Libraries, Reprint from 

the Annotated Code of Maryland, 1957 and 1962 Cumulative 

Supplement. 1963 
Public and School Library Development in Maryland, Maryland 

School Bulletin, Volume XXXIX, Number 2. February, 1963 
Policies and Programs, Public Secondary Education in Maryland, 

Maryland School Bulletin, Volume XXXIX, Number 3. April, 

1963 

Public Adult Education in Maryland, Maryland School Bulletin, 
Volume XXXIX, Number 4. May, 1963 

Members of the Board were informed that the following 
opinions had been received from the office of the Attorney Gen- 
eral since the last meeting of the Board: 

February 18, 1963 RE: Employment of architects 

February 21, 1963 RE: Driver education funds 

May 6, 1963 RE: Appropriation in 1963 of $975,000 

for payments to five political sub- 
divisions of additional equalization 
and incentive fund money as a re- 
sult of the Court of Appeals de- 
cision in Martin Company v. State 
Tax Commission 

The State Superintendent reported that following the special 
meeting of the Board on February 5, 1963, he wrote Mr. Christ 
G. Christis, Director of the Maryland State Teachers' Retire- 
ment System, concerning the State Board's action expressing 
itself "as favoring a policy which would permit teachers who 
are now on ten-month contracts and who find professional em- 
ployment with the local school systems during the summer to 
receive credit for such employment toward their retirement. ..." 
In accordance with the request of the State Board, the Board 



70 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



of Trustees of the Teachers' Retirement System adopted a policy 
that retirement deductions be made on all salaries received from 
the Boards of Education. 

As the Board of Trustees of the State Teachers Colleges : 
Adopted Rules and Regulations 100-105.5, inclusive, as the 
code of regulations of the Board of Trustees of the State Teachers 
Colleges, and all regulations, bylaws, or resolutions heretofore 
adopted are hereby repealed effective May 29, 1963. 

Approved the revised 1965-69 capital improvements pro- 
gram budget for the State teachers colleges, a summary of which 
is given below. 

Summary 

Revised Five-Year Capital Improvements Budget: 1965-69 
Maryland State Teachers Colleges 

1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Total 

Bowie $ 762,500 $ 242,500 $1,120,000 $ 848,000 $ 373,000 $ 3,346,000 

Frostburg 2,370,000 3,052,100 2,117,300 1,772,000 2,140,000 11,451,400 
Salisbury 1,333,870 190,000 433,000 70,000 500,000 2,526,870 
Towson.... 3,679,000 2,720,000 1,640,000 720,000 1,160,000 9,919,000 
Coppin .... 380,000 575,000 800,000 815,000 120,000 2,690,000 



Total ....$8,525,370 $6,779,600 $6,110,300 $4,225,000 $4,293,000 $29,933,270 

Reaffirmed its belief in the importance of maintaining out- 
standing laboratory schools as vital parts of good teacher edu- 
cation programs and endorsed wholeheartedly the following 
statement on the role and function of the campus laboratory 
school at the State teachers colleges. 

Over the years since the establishment of State teachers 
colleges in Maryland, the boards of trustees, the governors of 
the State, and the legislatures have demonstrated their belief 
in the importance of establishing and maintaining good labora- 
tory schools to support the teacher education programs at these 
institutions. 

As evidence of this commitment it may be noted that within 
a short time after the establishment of the first normal school 
in the State a laboratory school was instituted to support the 
program. Provision for the school was written into the law of 
1865 in these words: 

"He (the State Superintendent) shall make provision for model 
. . . schools under permanent and highly qualified teachers, in which 
students of the Normal School shall have opportunity to practice the 
modes of instruction and discipline inculcated in the Normal School."* 

The original thinking on the importance of laboratory 
schools has not diminished during the intervening century since 
the first "model" school was established as a vital part of the 
first normal school in the State. This continuing interest and 



^Seventy-five Years of Teacher Education, published by the Alumni 
Association of the State Teachers College at Towson, Maryland, 1941 



Maryland State Department of EIducation 



71 



support has been evidenced by the fact that completely new and 
modern facilities for this purpose have been provided at all five 
of the State teachers colleges within the past decade. 

The role of the laboratory school in teacher education has 
changed with the changing needs of the teacher-preparation 
institutions. Today it performs a much wider range of functions, 
such as: 

1. Experimentation and research 

2. Providing a place to try out new ideas in teaching and learning 

3. Providing limited locations for student teaching, including 
special cases requiring extended or remedial practice 

4. Providing opportunity for professional laboratory experiences 
for teacher education students 

5. In-service education and demonstration teaching for Maryland 
teachers 

These functions and a number of others can be facilitated 
best when the laboratory school is located on the same campus 
with the college which is offering the teacher education program. 
The campus laboratory school as established under the present 
Board of Trustees is considered a "sine qua non" of a good 
teacher education program for the following reasons: 

1. Its flexibility permits it to adjust easily and quickly to new 
ideas in teacher education. 

2. It is accessible to students in all phases of the teacher educa- 
tion program. 

3. It lends itself readily to experimental teaching. 

4. Its proximity to the college facilitates cooperative relation- 
ships with all departments and encourages college-wide re- 
search in learning. 

5. Being an integral part of the total teacher education program 
it commands a level of financial support commensurate with 
that of all other instructional programs in the college. 

It is recognized that each laboratory school will perform 
functions in accordance with its own faculty, resources, and 
current situation. Each will develop an identity in keeping with 
the nature of the teacher education program operating in the 
college. It would be a mistake, for example, to expect all five 
institutions to display equal interest in the function of research 
and experimentation. It would also be a mistake to assume that 
none is now suited to perform these functions. Yet it must be 
remembered that, to take on such specialized tasks, a college 
must be given added financial assistance, specialized faculty, and 
appropriate equipment. 

The Board of Trustees can feel confident that its belief in 
the indispensability of the campus laboratory school in teacher 
education is well founded. The faculties and administrators of 
these colleges, which are the principal sources of teachers for 
the State, have been reexamining the role of the laboratory 
school in teacher education and reaffirm their belief that a cam- 
pus laboratory school is a vital part of any good teacher educa- 
tion program. 



72 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



Adopted the policy that all librarians and registrars at the 
State teachers colleges who have attained permanent status under 
classified service be accorded tenure under faculty status and 
that all those who have not attained permanent status under 
classified service be given credit towards tenure under faculty 
status for whatever time they have served on probation under 
classified service. 

Reaffirmed its action of May 15, 1963, relating to tenure 
and probation of faculty members that the Board of Trustees 
of the State Teachers Colleges in revising the policies of those 
colleges relating to tenure and probation of faculty members 
and in revising the standard contract of faculty members care- 
fully considered the role of the college presidents in determining 
whether or not a probationary faculty member should be con- 
tinued in employment for the period of time required to achieve 
tenure. In so doing the Board concluded that, by reason of their 
close association with their staffs, the college presidents are in 
the best position to judge the qualifications of probationary 
faculty members. Therefore, the Board in February, 1962, 
specifically authorized the presidents of the State teachers col- 
leges to terminate the contracts of those probationary faculty 
members who, in the opinion of the presidents, should not be 
continued in employment. This policy is in keeping with sound 
administration and, in the opinion of the Board, achieves the 
most practical system which can be followed. 

In considering the matter of the probationary teachers at 
Frostburg State Teachers College who have been informed by 
the president that their contracts will not be renewed, the Board 
is of the opinion that it would be improper to intervene in light 
of the president's action and that such intervention would be 
contrary to the very policies which the Board has established 
in regard to tenure. 

Approved Staff changes in the State Department of Edu- 
cation which included : 

Lionel Burgess Retired as Supervisor of Case 

Services, effective July 31, 
1963 

Adopted the following resolution on the retirement of Mr. 
Burgess : 

Mr. Lionel Burgess 

Mr. Lionel Burgess, Supervisor of Case Services in the Division 
of Vocational Rehabilitation, will retire from the State Department 
of Education on July 31, 1963, after thirty-eight years of service to 
public education in Maryland. He taught in Howard County schools 
for two years, then was promoted to Attendance Officer and Supervisor 
of Colored Schools in the Board of Education. In 1940 he was made 
principal of Ellicott City Elementary School, and in 1944 he came to 
the State Department of Education as a vocational rehabilitation 
counselor. Mr. Burgess was appointed Case Work Supervisor in 1945. 



Maryland State Department of Education 73 

Mr. Burgess' service to education has been most significant. In 
every position he has held he has demonstrated a high sense of duty 
and responsibility and has exercised significant leadership. The pro- 
fessional standards that he has set and the procedure that he has 
been instrumental in establishing will serve for a long time to come 
in the development of vocational rehabilitation for disabled citizens 
along progressive lines. 

Mr. Burgess was bom on July 13, 1903, at EUicott City, Maryland. 
He was educated in the public schools in his home town, and following 
his high school graduation he worked for a while with the Ellicott 
Times. He entered the Maryland State Normal School at Towson 
and was graduated from there with honors in 1925. Later he attended 
The Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland, re- 
ceiving his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1936 and his Master of Edu- 
cation degree in 1948. 

Throughout his entire life Mr. Burgess has been a responsible 
citizen in his community. He has been an active member of his church 
and of a number of organizations, including the Kiwanis Club, the 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, the Order of the Eastern Star, 
and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. At the present time he 
is extremely active in the Patapsco Grange, serving this organization 
also as Master of the Maryland State Grange and Treasurer of the 
National Grange. 

The State Board of Education and the State Department of Edu- 
cation express to him their sincere appreciation for the invaluable 
contribution he has made to public education in Maryland and wish 
for him many pleasant years filled with health and happiness. 

Authorized the Peabody Institute of the City of Baltimore 
to grant a degree of Doctor of Musical Arts, effective May 29, 
1963. 

Approved revision of the Requirements for the Certification 
of Certain Teachers in Maryland Nonpublic Nonacademic Schools 
other than Directors of Schools, Dance Teachers, and Teachers 
of Beauty Culture, effective June 1, 1963. Also, approved re- 
quirements for the certification of teachers of driver education 
in Maryland nonpublic specialized schools, effective June 1, 1963. 

Adopted the Maryland Standards for Nonpublic Schools 
Offering Programs for Handicapped Children, effective June 
1, 1963. 

Adopted the financial report and budget forms and financial 
reporting manual as presented under the 1963 revision date, 
with the understanding that it may be necessary to revise both 
the manual and forms after a limited period of use. 



74 Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



DIVISION OF INSTRUCTION 

Curriculum Improvement and Materials 

The Supervisors of Curriculum participated in curriculum 
workshops, in-service conferences, and meetings with the staffs 
of local school systems. New materials prepared for distribution 
to the schools included the following : 

1. The bulletin on family life education, produced by the State 
Comniittee appointed earlier for this project 

2. The list of new audiovisual materials purchased during the 
year for the State Curriculum Center 

3. The basic list of curriculum materials developed since 1955 
and available for distribution through the Curriculum Center 

4. A bibliography of science education materials for science su- 
pervisors and teachers 

Plans were made for the removal of the Curriculum Center 
from the Enoch Pratt Free Library Building to a State office 
building at 2100 Guilford Avenue, Baltimore. Supervisors of 
curriculum played major roles in other activities as follows : 

1. Prepared an exhibit on the Civil War Centennial held at 
Annapolis. 

2. Planned a three-day annual audiovisual preview for the evalu- 
ation of filmstrips and recordings to be purchased for the State 
Curriculum Center. 

3. Served on elementary school evaluation teams working in St. 
Mary's, Cecil, and Anne Arundel counties. 

4. Served on evaluation teams from the Middle States Association 
of Colleges and Secondary Schools in Somerset and Caroline 
counties. 

5. Cooperated with the Maryland Audiovisual Association in spon- 
soring four audiovisual regional conferences throughout the 
State for the purpose of discussing desirable audiovisual pro- 
cedures and techniques for teachers. 

6. Assisted in planning the Newspaper Workshop held in the 
summer of 1963. 

7. Worked with other members of the staff in setting up science 
workshops at Bowie and Coppin State colleges and in planning 
science conferences in a number of the counties. 

8. Assisted the State Supervisor of Pupil Personnel and members 
of the State Department of Employment Security in preparing 
a filmstrip on the dropout. 

General Supervisory Activities — Elementary Schools 

I. Curriculum Revision 

Supervisory and consultative assistance was given this year 
to a number of local school systems that are revising the 
curriculum in the elementary schools. Such revision is also 
an in-service education program for the teachers and prin- 
cipals who are actively involved in planning and developing 
the new curriculum projects. This year major revisions were 
made in the following areas : 

1. The social studies. More emphasis is being placed upon the broad- 
ening of content in all grades to include historical events, geo- 
graphic influences, economic and social processes, and cultural 



Maryland State Department of EIducatiox 



75 



change. Special attention is also being given to the development 
of skills related to social studies and to the variety of materials 
and methods which can be used. 

2. The language arts. Revisions in these subjects stress the interre- 
lationship of all facets of communication — listening, speaking, read- 
ing, and writing. Emphasis is being placed on methods and ma- 
terials which can help all pupils develop skills in and attitudes 
toward the best use of the language arts. 

3. Science. This subject is considered a basic part of the educational 
program of all elementary school pupils. Curriculum revision 
stresses the importance of pupils' learning to use the processes of 
science in identifying and solving problems; the understanding of 
the physical and biological world; the ability to apply scientific 
knowledge. 

4. Mathematics. The newer mathematics programs are placing greater 
emphases upon pupils' understanding of basic concepts relating to 
the nature and structure of the number system, mathematical 
principles and their application, and the fundamental operations 
and their interrelationships. Much emphasis is also being placed 
upon opportunities for pupils to experiment and discover for them- 
selves how mathematics works, upon accurate and precise use of 
mathematical language, and upon materials that provide for in- 
dividual differences in skills and interests. 

II. In-service Education Programs 

The State program to improve the teaching of mathematics 
in the elementary schools which was started three years ago 
continued. During the summers of 1962 and 1963 teachers 
participated in workshops designed to help them to learn 
more about the newer content in mathematics, to teach the 
content more meanmgtully, and to learn ways of using 
materials of instruction more effectively. During the school 
year various types of in-service meetings were held to 
further these goals. An in-service education program in 
mathematics was provided via television for elementary 
teachers on the lower Eastern Shore in cooperation with 
Station WBOC in Salisbury. 

III. Experimental and Research Programs 

In education changes in curriculum planning and implemen- 
tation are brought about through experimentation and re- 
search. A number of projects were carried on in the local 
school systems to test new ideas, to investigate different 
approaches, and to seek more practical ways of solving some 
pressing problems. 

1. Team teaching, as it is being practiced in the elementary schools, 
appears in several forms: in some schools special instructors in 
art, music, physical education, and/or remedial reading plan and 
work with the regular classroom teachers in carrying forth pro- 
grams in these areas; in some schools a group of classroom teachers 
work together to extend and enrich programs for their pupils; 
In some schools teachers with special interests and superior skills 
form a team and work with groups of pupils from two or more 
classrooms. 

2. The nongraded or continuous progress plan of organization has 
been tried in a number of elementary schools: some of the schools 
use the nongraded plan in the primary grades only, while other 



76 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



schools are extending this plan to include the intermediate grades. 
Although many variations exist, the main purpose of each plan is 
to provide for individual differences of pupils. 

3. The local school systems continued to study and experiment with 
using the newer media in the teaching-learning process: in several 
local school systems the use of television for instruction has con- 
tinued in the direct teaching of science, music, foreign languages, 
literature, and art; more and varied uses for the tape recorder have 
been reported; possibilities for using programmed materials have 
been explored to a limited extent. 

4. Some teachers have been involved in a research project designed 
to determine the relationships that exist among the levels of a 
pupil's anxiety, self -concept, and achievement. A follow-up of this 
study will focus on helping teachers to create a more favorable 
environment for learning and to develop better ways and techniques 
of helping pupils develop positive self-concepts. 

IV. The Elementary School Study 

The State Committee to Study the Maryland Public Ele- 
mentary Schools continued to make progress during the year. 
The following reports were prepared by representatives 
from the various local school systems and presented to the 
Committee for study: 

Philosophy and Goals of the Elementary School 
Factors That Influence Elementary Education 
The Program of the Elementary School 
Organization of Pupils for Learning 
Staffing the Elementary School 
Meeting Varied Needs of Children 
Relationships with Parents and the Community 
Providing an Effective Environment 
Evaluating the Work of the School 

Further work will be needed on the study next year in 
preparing the report for final editing and publication. 

V. Maryland Conference on Elementary Education 

The annual conference for supervisors and principals of 
elementary schools had as its theme ^'Decision Making for 
the Sixties.'* More than 600 supervisors and administrators 
attended the conference. A number of distinguished educa- 
tors participated on the progi^am: Dr. Daniel E. Griffiths, 
Associate Dean, School of Education at New York Uni- 
versity, gave an address on ''Bases for Decision Making"; 
Dr. Joyce Cooper, Professor of Education at the University 
of Florida, discussed ''Direction for the Elementary School" ; 
Dr. Francis H. Horn, President of the University of Rhode 
Island, had as the title of his speech, "The Ends for Which 
We Educate." The assemblies were concerned with content, 
methods, materials, staffing, and organization of the school. 
Speakers included Dr. Dorothy McCure Eraser of Hunter 
College, Dr. Clarence W. Hunnicutt of Syracuse University, 
Dr. Robert H. Anderson of Harvard University, and Dr. 
Stuart E. Dean of the U. S. Department of Education. Dr. 
Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., Maryland State Superintendent of 



Maryland State Department of Education 



77 



Schools, closed the conference with an address entitled 'The 
Voice of the Teacher." 

VI. Evaluation of the Elementary School 

An increasing number of local school systems have instituted 
plans for evaluating the effectiveness of the educational pro- 
gram of an individual elementary school. Each plan required 
the use of a formalized instrument. Some systems developed 
their own set of criteria, while other systems used a stand- 
ardized instrument such as the Elementary Evaluative 
Criteria developed by Boston University. Each evaluation 
consisted of two phases : the involvement of the school fac- 
ulty in self-evaluation ; and a visiting team that supported 
and strengthened the staff's self -evaluation and opened up 
some new avenues for consideration. Both phases were de- 
signed to give direction to the continuous, on-going improve- 
ment program. 

General Supervisory Activities — Secondary Schools 

In the area of general supervision of high schools for the 
1962-63 school year, a number of involvements in specialized 
activities are worthy of mention : 

I. The Highly Able Learner 
Developments with respect to the highly able learner were 
maintained through representation on the State Committee 
which completed a policy bulletin on this subject and 
through participation in a regional conference on the gifted 
sponsored by the United States Office of Education in April, 
1963. 

II. Curriculum 

In the curriculum field, English and social studies received 
special attention. An English advisory committee which had 
been previously established developed detailed recommenda- 
tions pertaining to both the pre-service and in-service edu- 
cation of English teachers. These were presented for study 
to representatives of all Maryland colleges and universities 
engaged in the preparation of English teachers at a meeting 
in the fall of 1962. 

A State committee composed of representative school people 
from the local school systems and the State Department was 
appointed to formulate a policy statement on ''Strengthening 
Democracy through Education." This policy statement, de- 
signed specifically to clarify the situation within the schools 
vnth regard to the teaching of Communism and other con- 
flicting totalitarian ideologies, was submitted to the State 
Board of Education in August, 1962, for approval. The 
statement was approved and subsequently distributed to all 
of the local school systems together with an appropriate 
bibliography to be used as a resource in the local schools. 



78 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



III. State Committee to Study Maryland Public Secondary 
Schools 

The final report of the State Committee to Study Maryland 
Public Secondary Schools was edited and submitted for 
approval to the State Board of Education. Following State 
Board approval, the report entitled ''Policies and Programs, 
Public Secondary Education in Maryland,'' was printed as 
a Maryland school bulletin and distributed in quantity to 
school systems throughout the State. Its completion marked 
the culmination of a major and significant examination of 
high school programs in the State. 

IV. State Committee on High School Standards 

The work of the State Committee on High School Standards 
was continued through the year under the leadership of 
the general supervisor of high schools. Considerable prog- 
ress was made in the drafting of further revisions to exist- 
ing standards, with a complete report expected in the 1963- 
64 year. 

V. Regional Workshops 

A major activity undeii;aken by the general supervisors of 
high schools for the year involved the planning of two 
regional workshops for school administrators and super- 
visors. These workshops were sponsored cooperatively by 
the State Department of Education and the local school 
superintendents on the Eastern Shore and in Western Mary- 
land, respectively. The theme of these three-day conferences 
was "Improving Instruction,'' and each day was devoted 
to treatment in some depth of a major concern of the par- 
ticipants. The first day dealt with the whole area of human 
relations in teaching, the second day's topic centered around 
motivation and creativity in teaching and learning, while 
the theme for the last day was evaluating teaching and 
learning. The local school systems gave excellent support 
to this in-service activity with practically 100 per cent at- 
tendance from each county present for the three days. 

VI. The Maryland Conference on Secondary Education 

The annual Maryland Conference on Secondary Education 
held in March was well received by the 400 administrators 
and supervisors attending from throughout the State. Based 
upon the theme, "Decision Making for the Sixties," highly 
stimulating addresses were given by Dr. Warren Hill, Maine 
State Commissioner of Education; Dr. Erling M. Hunt, 
Professor of History at Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity; Dr. Lee A. DuBridge, President of California In- 
stitute of Technology; and Dr. B. Frank Brown, Principal 
of the Melbourne High School in Florida. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



79 



National Defense Education Act 

Science and Mathematics 

During the school year 1962-1963, the State Supervisor of 
High Schools in the areas of science and mathematics continued 
the administration and implementation of Title III of the Na- 
tional Defense Education Act. Both phases of the Act were 
involved, namely, administration of the equipment acquisition 
program and supervision in the areas of science and mathematics. 
Total financial assistance to local school systems under Title III 
projects amounted to $1,500,000, with half of this amount pro- 
vided by the Federal government and half from local funds. 

Assistance was provided to local school systems in the de- 
velopment of project requests for science and mathematics equip- 
ment. These projects were evaluated and processed at the State 
level to bring about the use of Federal matching funds for secur- 
ing this equipment. Increasing time and effort were required 
during this year in detailed administrative aspects of operating 
this program. 

Throughout the year, supervisory and consultant services 
were available to local school systems. Continuous contact was 
maintained with all local school systems and frequent visits 
provided opportunities for conferences, planning sessions, and 
participation in a variety of activities directed to the improve- 
ment of science and mathematics instruction. Local workshops, 
in-service institutes, and curriculum improvement programs were 
typical of the activities in this direction. Local school systems 
were kept advised of new equipment, new facilities, new infor- 
mation, new developments, new literature, and in-service oppor- 
tunities in the areas of science and mathematics education. 

State-local sponsored workships and in-service programs 
provided opportunities for teachers to become more familiar 
and to have first-hand experience with new content, philosophy, 
and methods in teaching mathematics and science. 

A one-day conference, as well as other opportunities, was 
provided for working with the growing number of local science 
and mathematics supervisors. 

Activities and opportunities were utilized by the State Super- 
visor to keep up to date in the latest thinking in science and 
mathematics education by participating actively in national pro- 
grams of science and mathematics supervisors as well as the 
conferences of the National Science Teachers Association and 
the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. 

Modern Foreign Languages 

During the school year 1962-63 the State Supervisor of 
Instruction, working under Title III of the National Defense 
Education Act, continued administration of the equipment ac- 
quisition program and supervision in the area of modern foreign 
languages. 



80 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



Assistance was provided to local school systems in the de- 
velopment of projects requesting language laboratory equipment 
and supplementary teaching aids. These projects were then 
evaluated and processed at the State level to insure effective use 
of Federal matching funds. 

Throughout the year supervisory and consultant services 
were available to local school systems. Continuous contact was 
maintained with them and visits provided opportunities for con- 
ferences, planning sessions, and participation in activities di- 
rected toward the improvement of modern foreign language 
education. 

State-local sponsored workshops and in-service programs 
helped teachers become more familiar with new content and 
methods in teaching modem foreign languages and with oppor- 
tunities for participation in NDEA Foreign Language Institutes. 
The State Supervisor participated in many one-day meetings 
held by the local school systems. State services included a two- 
week workshop for elementary teachers on teaching techniques 
for TV classroom follow-up and a four-week production work- 
shop for continuing the development of State audio-lingual cur- 
riculum materials in French and Spanish. French — Levels IV 
and V and Audio-Lingiuil Spanish— Part Illy with accompanying 
tapes, were published. In addition, a four-week workshop for 
evaluation of filmed materials resulted in the publication of 
Selected Filmed Materials for French and Spanish Classes. A 
two-week workshop in teaching techniques of modern foreign 
languages (all skills at all levels) was held for modern foreign 
language teachers in secondary schools. 

Several conferences of all the foreign language supervisors 
in the State were held to share ideas and to plan specific ways 
in which the Maryland State Department of Education could best 
help local foreign language instruction. 

The State Supervisor continued to work with the State col- 
leges and universities on common language problems. 

The State Supervisor of Instruction has also been actively 
engaged in national programs concerned with improving modern 
foreign language education. She has worked with the Modern 
Language Association, has lectured at NDEA Institutes, has 
participated in the College Entrance Examination Board Col- 
loquium on Curricular Change: Foreign Languages, has been 
a consultant to the U. S. Office of Education, has run a Consultant 
Center for the Association for Supervision and Curriculum De- 
velopment, and has served as Chairman of the Interim Board 
of Directors of the Department of Foreign Languages of the 
National Education Association. 

Guidance and Testing 

The State Supervisors for Guidance, Testing, and Pupil 
Services continue to assume responsibility for the supervision 
and implementation of the divisions of Title V-A of the National 



Maryland State Department of Education 



81 



Defense Education Act on guidance and testing. Activities in- 
volved in this program include the reviewing of the basic testing 
program of the 24 local school systems and maintaining a current 
file of standardized tests. Efforts were made to stimulate and 
encourage the effective utilization and interpretation of test 
results. 

Special Education 

Special Education is a program for those children who devi- 
ate from regular class children physically, mentally, socially, or 
emotionally. 

During the 1962-63 school year the supervisors of special 
education participated in the following activities concerned with 
these children: 

1. Held meetings with superintendents, principals, supervisors, 
and teachers in order to plan new programs for exceptional 
children and refine existing programs. 

2. Planned and conducted in-service training workshops in local 
school systems throughout the State. 

3. Visited special classes in public and private schools in order 
to evaluate teaching procedures, facilities, and equipment. 

4. Served on special committees with the Departments of Mental 
Hygiene and Health. 

5. Planned and conducted State-wide meetings for supervisors 
and administrators concerned with special education. 

6. Participated on the State Committee on Educational Programs 
for the Emotionally Handicapped. 

7. Acted as consultants in helping to plan special educational 
programs at colleges and universities throughout the State. 

8. Worked with the steering committee for the development of 
curriculum guides for the mentally retarded. 

9. Planned and directed a three weeks' workshop at Towson State 
College for teachers of the educable and trainable mentally 
retarded. 

10. Supervised the home teaching program. 

11. Reviewed, processed, and approved special programs for the 
payment of State-aid for handicapped children of preschool 
and school age. 

12. Worked cooperatively with the Director of the Maryland School 
for the Blind. 

13. Coordinated the yearly survey for school attendance and 
registration of blind pupils. 

14. Acted as members of the Advisory Council on Mental Hygiene. 

15. Processed the forms approving special classes. 

16. Processed home and hospital instruction forms. 

17. Worked in an advisory capacity for established local chapters 
of the Council for Exceptional Children. 

18. Participated in activities sponsored by the State Federation 
of the Council for Exceptional Children. 

19. Participated in conferences of social agencies dealing with 
exceptional children. 

20. Participated in parent conferences. 

21. Processed reports on children with speech and hearing 
handicaps. 

22. Supervised the educational program at Crownsville State 
Hospital. 

23. Worked cooperatively on the educational program at the Mary- 
land School for the Deaf. 



82 



Ninety-Se\t:nth Annual Report 



24. Supervised the educational program at Rosewood State 
Hospital. 

25. Planned and conducted the annual State-wide speech in-service 
meetings. 

26. Participated as committee members of the Joint Agency Plan- 
ning for Services to Handicapped Children and Youth (affiliated 
with NEA). 

Institutional Programs 

The major activities of the Supervisor of Special Education- 
Institutions during the school year 1962-63 included the follow- 
ing: development, evaluation, and redirection of the programs 
of education at State juvenile and correctional institutions; 
consultative and leadership participation in the total area of 
pupil services; assistance with the implementation of Title V 
of NDEA; and participation in various projects of the State 
Commission on Aging. 

Juvenile Institutions 

The Supervisor of Special Education-Institutions consulted 
with officials of the State Department of Public Welfare in re- 
gard to matters of integration, teacher certification, transfer of 
school records, curriculum changes in educational programs, in- 
service training, and other subjects affecting educational services 
at the different training schools and the other juvenile institu- 
tions. He conducted monthly professional meetings with training 
school directors of education in the interest of promoting pro- 
fessional growth in such areas as team teaching, programed 
instruction, ungraded classroom grouping of students, correc- 
tional and developmental reading, and various aspects of curri- 
culum development. He organized a preschool conference for all 
training school teachers on the theme "Mobilizing Educational 
Forces for Effective Learning.'' Dr. William C. Kvaraceus, noted 
authority on juvenile delinquency, delivered the keynote address. 
In-service training programs in reading, social studies, science, 
and industrial arts were planned cooperatively and provided 
general direction to these programs with the specialized con- 
sultant service of Dr. Gilbert Schiff man, Baltimore County Super- 
visor of Reading, and Dr. Donald Maley, Professor of Industrial 
Education at the University of Maryland. 

Carrectional Institutions 

The Supervisor of Special Education-Institutions consulted 
with the Commissioner of Correction in regard to the improve- 
ment of educational programs and facilities at the correctional 
institutions and visited the institutions periodically and offered 
suggestions for developing educational programs to meet the 
general and specific educational needs of inmates insofar as 
feasible, especially in the area of literacy. Assistance was given 
in the planning of a Teacher Training Institute during the month 



Maryland State Department of Education 



83 



of August for the teachers at the Penitentiary, Maryland Institu- 
tion for Men, Maryland Institution for Women, House of Cor- 
rection, and the Patuxent Institution; and a professional staff 
of instructors was recruited to conduct this important profes- 
sional growth activity. The Supervisor participated in the pro- 
gram of the Correctional Education Association held at Bon 
Air, Virginia. 

Commission on Aging 

The Supervisor of Special Education-Institutions was also 
actively engaged in the work of the State Commission on Aging 
which included attendance at regular meetings, participation in 
conferences, and preparation of various reports. As program 
chairman, he was responsible for the program planning of the 
State-wide Conference on 'The Role of Education in the Field 
of Aging" sponsored by the State Commission on Aging and held 
at the University of Maryland in September, 1962. 

Pupil Services 

Major emphases in programs of pupil services during 1962- 
63 were as follows: (1) continued development of local super- 
visory responsibility, (2) continued evolvement of effective 
organizational patterns to provide maximum use of school 
services coordinated with community services, (3) implementa- 
tion of the recommendations in the Department report on The 
Dropout, (4) implementation of the policy statements in the new 
Department bulletin on Policies and Programs, Maryland Public 
Secondary Schools, and (5) coordination of programs with other 
State organizations and agencies. 

1. Local supervisory responsibility 

A State-wide conference for directors and supervisors 
in the programs of pupil services — guidance, health, 
psychological, pupil personnel, and social work services — 
was held on April 24, 1963. This conference stressed the 
shared leadership role of the State and local supervisors 
in program development, coordination of all services, and 
professional growth of personnel involved in these programs. 

All 24 local systems provide specific supervisory per- 
sonnel in pupil personnel services, including the social work 
program in Baltimore City ; ten local systems provide super- 
visors with guidance as a major responsibility; four systems 
provide supervisors of psychological services ; and four sys- 
tems provide supervisors with responsibility for health 
services. 

2. Effective organizational patterns for local school systems 

Emphasis on coordination of services has resulted in 
continued evolvement of definite patterns of administration 



84 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



for pupil services. One local system has an assistant super- 
intendent responsible for this program with directors in 
each of the specific areas. Seven local systems now have 
directors of pupil services with supervisors responsible in 
the specific areas. Constant evaluation of this administrative 
plan indicates effective coordination of services within the 
school and in the community. 

3. Implementation of the Dropout Report 

Interest in high school dropouts has been manifested 
to a greater degree then ever before in the nation's history. 
Major newspapers and magazines have given wide coverage 
to the problem and even the President of the United States 
and the Governor of Maryland have expressed concern over 
the magnitude of the problem. A report of the survey of 
dropouts from the Maryland Public High Schools was com- 
pleted last year. The report has been widely distributed 
throughout the State and nation. The first printing of three 
thousand copies was exhausted at an early date ; therefore, 
an additional two thousand copies were printed. Requests 
for copies came from as far west as California and Oregon 
and from both the north and south. 

Conferences on the problems were held in all local school 
systems with superintendents, supervisors, principals, and 
other interested school personnel. As a result of these, num- 
erous projects were designed to maintain interest of students 
and to develop programs to help some of the slower students 
to succeed. 

Invitations to discuss the problem were received from 
numerous civic groups, including the Association of Ameri- 
can University Women, The League of Women Voters, Ro- 
tary Clubs, and religious and educational institutions of 
higher learning. The Department's efforts were reinforced 
by most governmental agencies and by the Departments of 
Employment, Welfare, Police, and Probation. These groups 
responded with much enthusiasm and requested information 
on ways in which they could help with the problem. Perhaps 
the group which reacted most overwhelmingly to the report 
was the Maryland Association of Student Councils. They 
selected areas where they thought they could work and in a 
matter of a few months held a number of regional meetings. 
They effected changes regarding club participation and the 
development of school climate in which more value is placed 
upon education. 

The one point which was emphasized in all contacts 
with audiences on the dropout was the need for expanding 
educational opportunities for all youth. This need was dra- 
matically reinforced by the high rate of unemployment 
throughout the State and nation. Parent-teacher groups 



Maryland State Department of Education 



85 



were very sympathetic to the request for expanded educa- 
tional services and opportunities. 

An evaluation must be made very carefully to make 
certain that some of the many pressures for new programs 
do not squeeze out time and efforts for instruction in some 
reading skills which would be more valuable for success in 
high school subjects. This is not a criticism of present 
methods but a recognition of two facts which constantly 
appear. Many of the students who dropped out of school had 
not acquired much skill in the area of reading and a high 
percentage of them gave lack of success as a reason for 
dropping out of school. In some follow-up studies with drop- 
outs, many indicated that their real problem was that they 
were not doing well because of reading. When potential 
dropouts are questioned about what can be done to help 
them, about one in three indicates help in reading is 
necessary. 

Gathering the data, summarizing, and completing the 
report may very well have been the easiest part of the solu- 
tion to the problem. Initiating programs to identify pupils 
with learning difficulties and other adjustment problems 
early in elementary and junior high school years must be- 
come a long-range goal. 

4. Implementation of policy statements in the new Department 
bulletin. Policies and Programs, Maryland Public Secondary 
Schools. 

State Department supervisors in visits with local super- 
intendents, in participation in local and regional workshops, 
and in work with individual supervisors stressed the 
following : 

a. The acceptance of services for pupils as an essential aspect 
of the total educational program, particularly in the individuali- 
zation of instruction. 

b. The effective use of the team concept in working with teachers, 
students, and parents. 

c. The need for constant study and evaluation of the functions 
performed by personnel in these programs in terms of need 
expressed by teachers and students. An excellent example of 
this need is the changing role of the psychologist and the in- 
creasing demands for his services as a consultant in working 
with teachers. 

d. The need to provide realistic ratios of pupils and personnel in 
pupil services if these services are to be provided effectively. 

5. Coordination of State program 

The State supervisors sharing responsibility in pro- 
grams of pupil services worked specifically to coordinate 
their leadership roles in working with local school systems. 
These supervisors also shared a very definite responsibility 
in the development of coordination with other State organi- 
zations and agencies, working in a cooperative capacity with 



86 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



the following groups: State Department of Employment 
Security ; Governor's Commission for Children and Youth ; 
Commission on Aging; Health and Welfare Council; Com- 
mittee on Juvenile Delinquency; State Departments of 
Health, Mental Hygiene, Correction, and Public Welfare; 
Commissioner of Personnel; and institutions of higher 
education. 

Trends and Developments in School Health 
AND Physical Education Programs 

Health Programs 

As co-chairman of the Maryland State School Health Coun- 
cil, the Supervisor of Physical Education collaborated with staff 
members of the Maryland State Department of Health and local 
boards of education and health for the printing of the ''Proceed- 
ings of the Maryland Conference on School Health Education." 
Plans were laid for joint subsidization of the printing by the 
State Departments of Health and Education, and for the distribu- 
tion of the report in the fall of 1963. A sufficient number of copies 
will be printed so that central staff members, members of boards 
of education, all principals, and persons who attended the con- 
ference may receive copies. 

One meeting of the Maryland State School Health Council 
was held. The most important action of this advisory group was 
the establishment of a subcommittee to study what can be done 
about the early identification of reading problems of children, 
that is, before they are enrolled in a school for the first time. 

Physical Education Programs 

The State Supervisor of Physical Education requested local 
supervisors responsible for physical education programs to re- 
port on program advancements that may or may not have been 
the result of a continuing national and State emphasis on im- 
proved physical fitness status of school-age children. Many local 
supervisors reported that they were able to acquire new physical 
education facilities and also improvements to those already exist- 
ing. Although the progress that had been made could not be 
traced directly to the emphasis on physical fitness, local super- 
visors were strongly in agreement that this factor had been of 
considerable help. 

There was considerable evidence that school systems were 
providing additional physical education teachers in grades 7-12 
to keep pace with the expanding population. Smaller counties 
began to experiment with having special physical education 
teachers in elementary school programs. 

A notable number of schools and school systems began 
seriously to incorporate gymnastic apparatus into their pro- 
grams. Clinics were sponsored at local levels for instructional 
and safe use of gymnastic apparatus. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



87 



Athletic Programs 

For the first time the Maryland Public Secondary Schools 
Athletic Association operated a single State Basketball Tourna- 
ment so that every county public senior high school was eligible 
to participate. The entire tournament was conducted with cordial 
relations existing among all schools and a high level of good 
sportsmanship prevailing. Necessary steps were also taken for 
all county public senior high schools to become automatically 
members of this organization which regulates their interschool 
sports programs. By being members, the schools comply with 
the policies and regulations of the Association and are privileged 
to participate in all of the events sponsored at district and State 
levels. 

As a result of the 1963 State Basketball Tournament, the 
financial status of the Association reached a favorable level. The 
funds on hand together with the predictable annual income made 
it possible for the Association to lay plans toward becoming an 
entirely self-supporting organization. New financial policies were 
formulated for consideration by the Association State Board of 
Control in the fall of 1963. 

A third annual football clinic sponsored by the Association 
for coaches and principals was probably more successful than 
the two held previously. 

An indoor track and field meet exclusively for Maryland 
secondary schools was sponsored by the Maryland National 
Guard. The M.P.S.S.A.A. was a cooperating organization. In 
preceding years this meet was sponsored by the South Atlantic 
Association of the A.A.U. and schools from outside the State 
also participated. The Committee that planned this year's meet 
felt that there was no need to invite schools from outside Mary- 
land as the number of Maryland schools wishing to take part 
was more than sufficient for an adequate and successful meet. 

Physical Fitness 

Supervisors responsible for local physical education pro- 
grams were called together for two all-day meetings. A decision 
was made to start the administering of the A.A.H.P.E.R. Fitness 
Test, 7 items, in the fall of 1963. However, schools that wished 
to do a trial run in the spring of 1963 were privileged to do so. 
The test is administered to 5th, 8th, and 11th graders, and only 
once at these grade levels. 

Outdoor Education 

School systems in Calvert, Frederick, Harford, Prince 
George's, and Washington counties operated outdoor school pro- 
grams in which children were taken for educational experiences 
in camp situations for a four- to five-day period. Other school 
systems took new interest in these programs, as reflected by the 
fact that an increasing number of them sent pilot groups or 



88 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



classes of children to participate in the established outdoor school 
programs. Teachers and staff members accompanied the visiting 
pilot groups. Maryland school systems are annually taking ad- 
vantage of the in-service training opportunity afforded by the 
Outdoor Education Workshop for school personnel throughout 
the nation. The Workshop is conducted by Michigan State Uni- 
versity at Gull Lake, Michigan, each summer for a two-week 
period. 

State and National Groups and Conferences 

In addition to his normal professional duties the State Super- 
visor of Physical Education : 

1. Served as President-elect of the Society of State Directors of 
Health, Physical Education, and Recreation. 

2. Acted as liaison person between the Maryland Commission on 
Physical Fitness and the Maryland State Department of 
Education. 

3. Served as Health Chairman of the Maryland Congress of 
Parents and Teachers. 

Adult Education 

Every school system in Maryland offered a program of 
general adult education in 1962-63. As usual, the programs varied 
greatly, each reflecting the interests and needs of the people and 
the communities. Among the offerings, courses in business edu- 
cation were by far the most extensive; this area was, in fact, 
the only one common to all school systems. 

Trends noted in preceding years have continued: local de- 
termination of offerings ; consideration of community problems ; 
concern for the needs of such groups as the aged, the school 
dropouts, and parents ; and coordination of adult education ef- 
forts within a community. 

Among the important activities of the year were the pub- 
lication of Public Adult Education, Maryland School Bulletin, 
Volume XXXIX, Number 4, May, 1963 ; participation in a State 
Conference on Aging at College Park in September, 1962 ; a State 
meeting on parent education in May, 1963 ; and two State meet- 
ings of all local supervisors responsible for adult education. Items 
which received special attention as a result of these activities 
were consideration of new standards, evaluation of adult educa- 
tion, and promotion of parent education. In addition, attention 
has been directed to the need for realization of the recommenda- 
tions contained in the bulletin. Public Adult Education. 

Civil Defense Adult Education Program 

The civil defense adult education program completed its first 
full year of operation after a contract was made between the 
Maryland State Board of Education and the United States Office 
of Education on February 28, 1962. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



89 



Civil defense adult education is a joint Federal-State pro- 
gram. The Federal government finances the program and is 
responsible for its over-all planning and direction. The Civil 
Defense Adult Education Coordinator assumes the responsibility 
for conducting the program in the State. The coordinator works 
with the local school officials, community organizations, com- 
munity leaders, and others to organize classes, to inform the 
community about the classes, and to encourage attendance. Also, 
the coordinator works with local school officials in recruiting 
and training teachers for these courses. 

During the year emphasis was placed on training teachers 
throughout the State to qualify them as instructors in the pro- 
gram. Fifteen local school systems participated in training pro- 
grams during the year, and from these classes 168 teachers 
became certified and eligible to teach survival preparedness in 
the adult education programs of the local school systems. Through 
the efforts of the local adult education programs, 97 classes were 
formed, 3,018 adults enrolled in the various classes, and 1,666 
adults received completion certificates. 

The State Coordinator of Civil Defense Adult Education 
appeared before many groups throughout the year for the pur- 
pose of promoting the program. He worked closely with the State 
civil defense agency and local civil defense agencies participating 
in the program. A Civil Defense Manual for the schools of Mary- 
land was written in cooperation with the State civil defense 
agency. 

The complete curriculum material went through two re- 
visions in order to keep pace with the rapid growth of civil 
defense information and procedures. With each revision, a course 
outline was prepared for the teachers. Precise references were 
listed for each topic from the course outline. When revisions 
were completed, they were sent immediately to the teachers in 
the program. 



90 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



DIVISION OF LIBRARY EXTENSION 

Library activities at the State level have been focused on 
studies of library needs and on the development and implemen- 
tation of plans for the further improvement of library services. 
Those relating to libraries in general are described briefly below. 
Others are included in the school and public library section of 
this report. 

The need for a comprehensive publication on libraries in 
Maryland for professional and general use led to the preparation 
and publication of the Maryland School Bulletin V. 39, No. 2, 
Public and School Library Development in Maryland. It was 
developed "to provide a source of information on the functions 
and services of the Maryland State Department of Education 
relating to libraries, and an over-all review of the progress, 
trends, and needs of public and school libraries in the State." 
This bulletin has been distributed to school and public library 
officials and other interested citizens in the State. 

The pressing problem of the insufficient number of librarians 
available led to the appointment by the State Superintendent 
of Schools of a committee to study the need for a graduate li- 
brary school in Maryland. The committee made a comprehensive 
survey of the need in all major types of libraries. Miss Amy 
Winslow, former Director of the Enoch Pratt Free Library, 
used the findings of this and previous studies to prepare a full 
report on the personnel situation in the libraries of the State 
and the need for qualified librarians. The report was used as 
the basis for further investigation by a faculty committee at the 
University of Maryland with the resulting recommendation by 
that committee for the establishment of a graduate library school 
at the University of Maryland. As a consequence of these and 
related activities on the matter, the University of Maryland is 
requesting funds in the 1964-65 budget for the establishment 
of a graduate library school. 

Public Librarians 

Identification of some of the common problems and most 
pressing needs of public libraries led to the appointment of 
several State-wide committees to study the problems and make 
recommendations. 

Study Committees and Recommendations 

A committee to study the need for an over-all program of 
in-service training of library staff worked most of the year and 
in its final report recommended that the Division of Library 
Extension plan and direct a program of training for nonlibrary 
school graduate staff members currently employed in public 
libraries throughout the State. The training should emphasize 
knowledge of the content of books in various subject areas and 



Maryland State Department of Education 



91 



methods of providing satisfactory service to library users. The 
Division of Library Extension is developing plans to begin such 
a program in one or two areas of the State in the fall of 1963. 

A committee studying the ways to extend and to improve 
the services the Enoch Pratt Free Library currently provides 
to the rest of the libraries in the State through contract with 
the State Department of Education recommended that a teletype 
communication system be installed between Pratt and the head- 
quarters library in each county to provide for rapid central 
reference and information service and for speedier interlibrary 
loan services. Such a system is in operation in New York State 
and other areas of the country. Efforts have been made through 
budget requests to implement this recommendation. 

Other committes are currently at work on studies in such 
areas as need for revision of current certification requirements 
for public librarians and establishment of minimum salary scale 
for public library administrators. 

A committee of librarians from the Baltimore metropolitan 
area was formed at the request of the Metropolitan Area Com- 
mission to study ways to improve library services and efficiency 
through cooperation among the public libraries in the Baltimore 
metropolitan area. Baltimore City, the five surrounding counties, 
and the State Division of Library Extension are represented on 
the committee. 

Conferences 

The Association of Public Library Administrators held four 
meetings during the year to discuss such topics as: programs 
of in-service training for Public Library Administrators ; needed 
legislation for public libraries; current calculations on present 
State aid; contract services of the Enoch Pratt Free Library; 
public library service to students. 

Plans are under way for four regional conferences for public 
library trustees to be held in the fall of 1963 under the auspices 
of the State Department of Education and the Trustees Section 
of the Maryland Library Association. The general theme of the 
meetings will be the relationship between the library board and 
the librarian in improving library services. 

Progress in Library Services 

Public libraries continue to show marked increase in book 
collections and in use. In 1962-63, more than 13,000,000 books 
and other materials were borrowed from these libraries, an in- 
crease of about one million over the previous year. Some 300,000 
books were added to library collections, accounting for an ex- 
penditure of more than $1,400,000 for books and other materials. 
Lack of qualified personnel continues to be a serious problem 
and shows slight improvement only in the larger metropolitan 
library systems. 



92 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



The use of the contract services of the Enoch Pratt Free 
Library continues to increase, with about a 15 per cent increase 
over 1961-62 in books, films, and other materials borrowed by 
the libraries of the State. 

The Eastern Shore Processing Center expanded its services 
to allow other libraries in the State to make an agreement with 
the center for the ordering and processing of their books. Seven 
additional public libraries requested such services so that at the 
present time fourteen of the smaller public library systems are 
taking advantage of this cooperative arrangement, thus relieving 
local staff of many routines that do not have to be performed 
at the local level. Each library pays seventy-five cents per volume 
for cataloguing and processing costs. The center is located in 
the Wicomico County Library, Salisbury, and is under the 
administrative supervision of the Wicomico County Library 
Administrator. 

Cooperative projects among public libraries continued suc- 
cessfully in the Southern Maryland and the Kent-Caroline re- 
gional library associations and in other areas of the Eastern 
Shore. The value of the existing projects has been demonstrated 
sufficiently to begin to plan for ways in which more compre- 
hensive cooperation might be undertaken. 

Local Library System Highlights 

The Wicomico County Library received an award of $1,000 
from the Book-of-the-Month Club for improvement of library 
services. The award was presented at the dedication of the new 
library building by Mr. James Bryan, President of the American 
Library Association. 

Baltimore County Public Library pioneered in the planning 
and conducting of an intensive program of in-service training 
for certain library staff members. Known as the Library Aide 
Training Program, the course was designed for nonprofessional 
personnel working in branch libraries and serving the public. 
The course was held two days a week for six months for a total 
of 48 days. It covered the significant and most useful materials 
in reference, the various subject fields, fiction, and children's 
literature. Emphasis was placed on knowledge of the library 
collection in serving the needs of library users. 

A number of new library buildings were erected, the major 
ones being the central libraries in Wicomico and Howard coun- 
ties, and a major branch in Wheaton in Montgomery County. 
Two new area libraries designed to serve as major reference 
and information centers for a large county area are scheduled 
to open in the fall, in Catonsville in Baltimore County and near 
Hyattsville in Prince George's County. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



93 



School Libraries 

The highlights of the library program were two research 
studies of school libraries, one at the state level and one at the 
local level. 

The first status study of school libraries in Maryland was 
begun. It involved every public school superintendent, principal, 
and librarian in the State; required the cooperation of several 
divisions of the State Department of Education and the U. S. 
Office of Education; necessitated extensive committee work in- 
volving school administrators and librarians ; and drew innumer- 
able hours of work from countless other individuals. 

The structure of the committee, appointed by the State 
Superintendent of Schools to plan and direct the study, was 
sound; school administrators serving with the group were able 
to advise what information was pertinent as well as what was 
feasible ; school library supervisors knew which data would have 
significance in their program. The consultant from the U. S. 
Office of Education had had experience with similar studies at 
the national level. 

It was decided that no attempt would be made to evaluate 
the quality of library services except to the degree that the 
quantity of materials, facilities, and personnel also reflects 
quality. The questionnaire was divided into three parts: 

Section I — Status of Indi\adual School Libraries, which was dis- 
tributed through the central offices of the 24 school 
systems and completed by every public school. 

Section II — Services for School Libraries from the Central Office, 
completed by each of the 24 local systems. 

Section III — Personnel and Expenditures for Indi\idual School 
Libraries, also completed by the central office staffs 
in the various systems. 

The questionnaire was designed by members of the Division 
of Research and Development. This insured that machine tabu- 
lations of the questionnaires could be made and that financial 
factors obtained could be related to those collected for other 
purposes. 

The completed questionnaires were checked for consistency 
after which they were turned over to the Division of Research 
and Development, for the preparation of the tables. It is no 
exaggeration to say that any strength the study may have is 
due in large measure to the direction and work that this Division 
has given to it. 

The Charles County Board of Education staff made the 
most detailed study of their school libraries which has been made 
by any school system in the State. It went into greater detail 
about the quality and quantity of library materials in individual 
schools than did the state survey and will serve as a basis for 
formulation of standards for future growth. At the end of the 
school year, all questionnaires had been returned and were to 
be tabulated during the summer. 



94 



Ninety- Seventh Annual Report 



Changes in certification for school librarians were approved 
by the State Board of Education. 

The Anne Arundel County Board of Education received a 
National award from the Encyclopaedia Britannica Company 
for having made marked progress in the development of its school 
library program. 

Miss Peggy Sullivan, a member of the Montgomery County 
Board of Education library supervisory staff, was selected to be 
the Director of the Knapp Project, a million dollar grant to the 
American Library Association for the improvement of school 
libraries throughout the nation. 

The Professional Library was established in May, 1959. Its 
purpose is to provide reference sources and circulating materials 
of books, pamphlets, and periodicals in the field of education. 
New Book Lists were issued three times during the fiscal year 
of 1962-63. Constant and frequent use is made of the collection 
by the staff of the Department. There is urgent need for an 
additional staff member so that reference services may be pro- 
vided and staff may be available in the library to assist library 
users. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



95 



DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

The Vocational Education Division encompasses the follow- 
ing major areas: Agriculture; Distributive Education; Educa- 
tional Services to Industry; Home Economics; Industrial Arts; 
and Trade and Industrial Education including Apprenticeship 
Training, Fire Service Extension, Tax Assessors Program, Man- 
power Development and Training, Practical Nurse Education, 
and Technical Education. 

The services of the Division have been markedly increased 
with the addition of supervisors for Industrial Arts, Apprentice- 
ship Training, and Manpower Development and Training. 

Agriculture 

The Vocational Agriculture program continues to expand 
and develop, marked by some increase in enrollment and im- 
provement in facilities. Significant changes have been the growth 
of Ornamental Horticulture in the Washington, D.C., suburban 
area and the enthusiastic support of the Adult Farm Manage- 
ment program in Frederick and Montgomery counties. 

Major factors which are affecting the Vocational Agriculture 
program in Maryland are: (1) the State- wide increase in part- 
time farming; (2) the decline in profits from dairying; (3) the 
decline in the number of workers in farming and the increase 
in the number of workers in occupations closely related to farm- 
ing due to the increase in farm mechanization, the constant 
contribution of research in spectacular new procedures and 
methods, and the changing production and marketing pattern 
in various areas of the State. 

The expansion of the Future Farmers of America program, 
aimed at the development of a higher level of leadership in 
agriculture, has continued with the assimilation of the 
thirteen New Farmers of America chapters into the State FFA 
association. 

Distributive Education 

More than seventy-five administrators and supervisory per- 
sonnel from the local school systems attended two State-wide 
meetings, held in Baltimore, to discuss * 'Quality Distributive 
Education Programs.'* Plans for the improvement of the cur- 
riculum and for teacher training were established. 

A curriculum development workshop was held in June in 
cooperation with the Montgomery County Board of Education. 
Directed by Mr. Earl Dodrill, Delaware State Director of Dis- 
tributive Education, Maryland Distributive Education teacher- 
coordinators developed a curriculum guide for the two-year 
sequence preparatory portion of the distributive education 
program. 



96 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



A significant development was the organization of the Dis- 
tributive Education Youth Clubs in Allegany and Montgomery 
counties and Baltimore City. Charters were received as members 
of the National Distributive Education Clubs of America. A 
State organization, the Maryland Association of D.E.C.A., was 
chartered and State officers were elected. Two representatives 
of the Gaithersburg High School Chapter attended the National 
Leadership Conference of D.E.C.A., held in Chicago, where they 
presented a Maryland flag to the officials as Maryland was wel- 
comed as a new State on the D.E.C.A. roster. 

Educational Services to Industry 

In cooperation with the Maryland Society of Training Di- 
rectors, McCoy College, and The Johns Hopkins University, 300 
supervisors and management personnel participated in a work- 
shop to improve supervisory skills in 'Improving Job Methods 
and the Incident Process" held at The Johns Hopkins University. 

More than 250 school business officials, principals, super- 
visors, and head custodians from 19 local school systems and 
ten colleges and State institutions attended a three-day **Build- 
ing Care and Operations Workshop" held at Salisbury State 
Teachers College in June. The program was developed in coopera- 
tion with the Association of School Business Officials of Mary 
land and the District of Columbia, the local school systems, and 
the college. 

Approximately 100 supervisors and management personnel 
participated in a one-day workshop on "Creative Thinking and 
Brainstorming" conducted in cooperation with the Maryland 
Society of Training Directors and the Central Branch of the 
Y.M.C.A. Techniques and procedures for conducting similar 
conferences were discussed. More than 250 ideas for the use of 
the new Baltimore Civic Center generated in a brainstorming 
session of one hour. 

The Maryland League for Nursing, Department of Hospital 
Nursing, was given assistance in programming a series of train- 
ing sessions for the Directors of Nursing of the thirty-two gen- 
eral hospitals in Maryland. 

Home Economics 

In the Home Economics program special attention was given 
to the area of Child Development. A three-week workshop at the 
State level was held for supervisors and teachers. Many in-service 
programs at the local level were devoted to the improvernent 
of instruction in child development, to an increase in the offerings 
in this phase of the program for older students, and to m_ore 
opportunities for directed observation and participation with 
preschool age children. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



97 



The State and local officers of the Future Homemakers of 
America organization participated in a leadership training con- 
ference to develop the program of work for their State associa- 
tion. In keeping with the customary practice of having the pro- 
gram based on current problems and needs of youth, the main 
objective for 1962-63 was "Strengthening My Education for 
Future Roles" and the theme for the year was ''Stay in School." 
Chapters throughout the State sponsored a wide variety of school 
and community activities to encourage young people to remain in 
school. 

The State and local officers of the New Homemakers of 
America Association and their advisers participated in regional 
conferences to assist them in their study of the Future Home- 
makers of America Association as plans were being made to 
integrate the two youth associations in the next school year. 

More than 7,500 individuals participated in the adult edu- 
cation program. Reports continue to show that many adults 
use the information not only for personal and family living but 
also for wage earning to supplement the family income. The 
skills and knowledge learned in the areas of clothing, millinery, 
food preparation, home crafts, and furniture repair and refinish- 
ing have been especially helpful to individuals in wage-earning 
pursuits. 

Industrial Arts 

The services of the Vocational Division were augmented by 
the appointment of a Supervisor of Industrial Arts Education 
on September 1, 1962. Consultative services were provided in 
the areas of curriculum development, school shop planning, 
teacher education, teacher recruitment, and research. 

Immediate results were observable in the program through 
the promotion of and participation in teachers in-service meet- 
ings, workshops, and committees. The upgrading of existing 
facilities, revising of curricula, and standardization of practices 
and procedures were major items of concern. 

Participation and leadership in State and national profes- 
sional organizations were provided as part of a planned program 
of activities. 

Trade and Industrial Education 

Increased enrollments, improvement of facilities, the addi- 
tion of new programs, and expansion of services marked the 
development of trade and industrial education in Maryland. 

Improvement in trade and industrial programs was sought 
through the technique of making local surveys. Assistance and 
financial support was given local units, particularly in Baltimore 
and Wicomico counties, to conduct such surveys. New programs 
were developed as a result. 



98 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



A well qualified trade and industry teacher trainer was added 
to the staff of the Industrial Education Department of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland to improve the quality of teacher training 
in this field in the State. 

The Division staff has worked extensively with local super- 
visors and administrators to develop interest in new programs, 
consideration of local surveys, better cooperation with the local 
units and the State Departments of Employment Security and 
Economic Development, and other agencies concerned with the 
economic and educational welfare of all citizens. 

Apprenticeship Training 

With the addition of new sections to the Maryland Code for 
"Planned Apprenticeship Programs,*' the Maryland Apprentice- 
ship Council was established to be administratively supported 
by the State Department of Education. A supervisor of ap- 
prenticeship was appointed to the Division to help implement the 
program. The Maryland public school systems conducted instruc- 
tion for apprentices with 984 students being enrolled in train- 
ing classes. 

Fire Service Extension 

This program conducted by the Director of the Fire Service 
Extension Department of the College of Engineering at the 
University of Maryland utilized the services of 70 instructors 
in 106 classes with a total enrollment of 3,756. 

Tax Assessors Program 

This program, a one-week workshop, conducted at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland proved to be successful, registering a large 
increase in enrollment over the previous year. 

Manpower Development and Training Act Program 

Maryland became one of the first states to implement train- 
ing programs under the Manpower Development and Training 
Act of 1962. A supervisor of Manpower Training was added to 
the staff to guide the development of the program. 

Persons unemployed due to job elimination through auto- 
mation, technical advances, shifts in market demands, or lack 
of previous vocational training received training and placement 
in the following areas: auto body repair, auto mechanics, clerk- 
typist, cook entry, draftsman, electronic mechanics, floral design, 
licensed practical nurse, machine tool operator, and offset 
pressman. 

Cooperation between the State Departments of Education 
and Employment Security has been excellent, providing a sound 
basis for future endeavors. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



99 



Practical Nurse Education 

Enrollments have increased in both the high school and 
adult programs in practical nurse education which are con- 
ducted at Mergenthaler Vocational-Technical High School in 
Baltimore City. 

An increased interest in practical nurse education and train- 
ing has been evidenced by the organization of a separate depart- 
ment of practical nursing in the Maryland League for Nursing. 
Assistance was given to this organization in planning a workshop 
to improve the performance of the practical nurse. 

Technical Education 

In an effort to increase the number of technical education 
programs in the State, two State-wide conferences were held for 
school administrators who were considering the establishment 
of such programs. Three secondary and one community college 
programs were added to make a total of ten high schools and 
five community colleges offering technical programs. 

A four-week workshop was conducted in Montgomery 
County as an in-service program for instructors and supervisors 
to assist them in developing resource material in all technologies 
represented and to orient them in the total program of technician 
training. 



100 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



DIVISION OF CERTIFICATION AND ACCREDITATION 

The services of the Division of Certification and Accredita- 
tion for the year 1962-63 may be reported generally under four 
broad headings: 

1. Certification of teachers 

2. Accreditation of educational programs 

3. High School Equivalence Certificates 

4. Teacher recruitment — scholarships 

Certification 

As a result of transferring the issuance of teachers' cer- 
tificates to IBM processing there are certain statistics previously 
recorded which are not available for the year 1962-63. However, 
there were 5,388 new teachers and principals employed in the 
Maryland county schools during the year of whom 2,978, or 56.1 
per cent, received regular certificates. Of those not regularly 
certificated, more than 75 per cent held college degrees, showing 
a continued increase in the number of teachers employed on sub- 
standard certificates who have completed work for the basic 
degree. Many of these teachers lack only six semester hours of 
recent college credit or some of the specifically required profes- 
sional courses to attain full certification. 

In accordance with the certification requirements adopted 
in May, 1961, it is now possible to issue noncitizen teaching per- 
mits on an annual basis. For the year 1962-63, 31 noncitizen 
teaching permits were issued, of which 12 were equivalent to 
a regular certificate. 

It may be assumed that the new certificate requirements 
which became effective July 1, 1961, have contributed to the rise 
in the percentage of new teachers and principals who are regu- 
larly certificated. The provisions for accepting recommended 
graduates of institutions accredited by the National Council for 
the Accreditation of Teacher Education and reciprocity with 
states within the Northeast Reciprocity Compact Area have both 
expedited the certification process and permitted the issuance 
of certificates to applicants who previously may have been issued 
emergency certificates because of shortages in one or two areas. 

In November, 1962, the State Board of Education adopted 
requirements for certification in special teaching areas. This 
action completed the total revision of the teacher certification 
requirements. The new requirements are being applied appropri- 
ately, and it is hoped that within the next year any necessary 
adjustments will be made and a new certificate bulletin published 
for general distribution. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



101 



Accreditation 

Institutions of Higher Learning 

During the academic year no new community college pro- 
grams were given official approval to operate in the State. How- 
ever, all eleven of the public community colleges approved 
previously continued to show increases in enrollment and other 
indications of developing strength as colleges of the State. Mem- 
bers of the Department served on various committees of the 
Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 
and assisted in the evaluation of college level programs. One 
additional community college, the Baltimore Junior College, 
received initial accreditation by the Middle States Association 
of Colleges and Secondary Schools ; and Hood College, as a result 
of reevaluation, had its accreditation reaffirmed. Members of 
the staff assisted in preliminary visits by Middle States to 
Catonsville and Prince George's community colleges. These visits 
were not for the purpose of accreditation but were intended to 
acquaint these college communities with the procedures of Middle 
States and to point out areas in which improvement of the 
programs should be sought. Staff members also participated in 
an evaluation by the National Council for the Accreditation of 
Teacher Education at one college in the State. Initial accredita- 
tion for this institution was deferred. 

Work with the Fulbright scholarship program continues to 
be a function of the Division, and a member of the staff worked 
with the Maryland State Committee on Fulbright Scholarships 
which met in November of 1962 and nominated a panel of 
candidates for these awards. 

The Assistant Director of the Division continued to serve 
as secretary to the Commission for the Expansion of Public 
Higher Education in Maryland under the chairmanship of Mr. 
John N. Curlett. Following the report of this body to the Gover- 
nor of Maryland on June 25, 1962, the work of the staff member 
consisted of caring for the follow-up correspondence of the 
Commission, mailing of copies of the publication, and liaison with 
the various committees of the Legislature as they considered 
proposed legislation which had been recommended in the report. 

Approval of college level programs for the training of war 
veterans and orphans continues to be a very active function of 
the Division. During the year approvals were granted to 15 
hospitals and schools of nursing and 45 colleges and universities. 

The publication of an information sheet on State-approved 
colleges and universities in Maryland was continued as a func- 
tion of the Division. 

During this academic year Allegany Community College 
and Anne Arundel Community College were given authority by 
the State Board of Education to confer the associate-in-arts 
degree. The Baltimore Hebrew College was authorized to issue 
the baccalaureate degree, and the Peabody Institute was author- 



102 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



ized to confer the doctorate in the field of music. One postgraduate 
institute was given authorization to operate as an educational 
institution. In addition, three other collegiate institutions re- 
quested authority to grant degrees, but, for various reasons 
concerning the programs or policies of the institutions, con- 
sideration of these requests was deferred and, by agreement 
with the colleges, the requests were not presented to the State 
Board of Education. 

During the year an intensive study of the teacher education 
programs offered by colleges in the State was initiated. It is 
hoped that the results of this study can be published in a form 
which will provide for the continued accuracy of information 
concerning the programs offered within the State by the various 
collegiate institutions. During the 1963 session of the Maryland 
State Legislature legislation was enacted providing for the trans- 
fer of the five State teachers colleges from the original board 
of trustees to a new State College Board. The board was ap- 
pointed by the Governor and was organized in July of 1963. For 
a period of some four months the Assistant Director of the 
Division served as acting executive director for the Board of 
Trustees of the State Colleges. 

Nonpublic Academic Schools Below College Level 

The number and kind of academic schools below college level 
which were operating in the State in 1962-63 and which had 
been approved by the Department were as follows : 



Type of School Number 

Secondary 57 

Tutoring 7 

Nursery school (only) 28 

Kindergarten (only) 43 

Combination of nursery school and kindergarten 19 

Preschool through elementary 21 

Elementary (only) 8 

Elementary through secondary 8 

Preschool through secondary 2 

Special 21 



Total 214 



Nonpublic Secondary Schools 

On the approved list of nonpublic academic secondary schools 
there are 67 regular secondary schools and seven tutoring schools. 
Of these 74 schools, 52 are church-operated and 22 are privately- 
operated. Interest in the continued operation and establishment 
of new nonpublic secondary schools continues throughout the 
State. The inquiries for information concerning the procedure 
for establishing such schools have come from both church- 
sponsored groups and organizations and private individuals or 
groups of such individuals. In some cases the initial inquiry was 
followed through and an application for approval was submitted 



Maryland State Department of Education 



103 



and eventually an approved school resulted. In other cases the 
cost of establishing a program worthy of approval or the dif- 
ficulty of obtaining suitable quarters served as a deterrent and 
the schools initially visualized failed to develop. The net result 
is an over-all increase of three nonpublic secondary schools 
operating within the State. 

Nonpublic Nursery Schools, Kindergartens, Elementary Schools, and 

Special Schools 

These schools are operating in the following ways : 



Cooperatives with parents participating 40 

Cooperatives administered by parents who do not 

participate daily 11 

Smaller centers (proprietary — 3 groups or less) 32 

Larger centers (proprietary — 4 groups or more) 12 

Schools governed by board of directors 31 

Church-sponsored centers 9 

Others (sponsored by housing projects, civic 

groups, colleges, etc.) 15 



Total 150 



Of this total, 43 schools have indicated on the 1962-63 annual 
report that the school is incorporated as nonprofit. 

Unlike the secondary schools, a number of the academic 
schools below the secondary school level discontinue operation 
each year. As has been the case for the secondary schools, how- 
ever, considerable interest has been shown in the opening of 
new schools. While five such programs discontinued operation, 
eight new programs were approved. During the 1962-63 school 
year there were actually 19 centers offering day nursery or 
extended day care programs as a part of the whole program, 
even though the program is not referred to as such by the di- 
rector. In 13 of these centers the entire program was originally 
approved when the Maryland Nonpublic School Law, Section 
25 of Article 77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland (1957 edi- 
tion) , became effective in 1948. There are still 12 of these pro- 
grams which are approved in the entire operation. Of the 
remaining seven, one center once fully approved now has ap- 
proval of only kindergarten and elementary programs. There 
are six schools, kindergarten and/or elementary programs ap- 
proved, which never requested approval of the nursery program. 
Enrollment figures indicate that there are 445 preschool children 
and 283 elementary children enrolled for the full day at centers 
which provide day nursery or extended day care programs. There 
are also 372 children attending half-day sessions at these centers. 
Six centers have not included in their enrollment figures the 
number of preschool age children in the day care programs which 
are not approved. In the schools approved for children below 
secondary school age there are ten centers where all or some 
of the children may live in the school 24 hours a day. Two of 
these schools are for girls only; three are for boys only. Five 



104 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



of these schools are classified as special schools. In the total of 
all schools classed as special schools there are 20 programs offer- 
ing services for handicapped children. Five of these are the 
boarding schools referred to above. Programs are set up specifi- 
cally for retarded at ten centers, specifically for the emotionally 
disturbed at four centers, specifically for retarded and disorders 
of central nervous systems at one center, specifically for cerebral 
palsy in three centers, specifically for the blind at one center, 
and specifically for communicative disorders at one center. Two 
of these centers are for preschool age children. In any one of 
these centers children may be found who have multiple handicaps. 
There are 992 children enrolled in these special schools. Of the 
total 73 have been identified as emotionally disturbed. The 
Supervisor of Special Education has the responsibility of approv- 
ing applications for State Aid to provide tuition of children 
enrolled at any of these centers. Enrollment in the nonpublic 
elementary and preschool centers during the two years 1961-62 
and 1962-63, including new schools approved during each of these 
two years, were as follows : 

Enrollment* 

Type of School 1962-63 1961-62 

Nursery schools 1,753 1,781 

Kindergartens 2,804 2,538 

Elementary schools t3,615 3,642 

Special schools 992 855 

Total 9,164 8,816 

Nonpublic Specialized Schools 

In this classification 63 schools applied for approval of 
which 48 received certificates and 15 received tentative approval. 
Eighteen schools closed in the period July 1, 1962, to June 30, 
1963. Two members of the staff participated in April of 1963 
in the conference of the National Home Study Council held in 
New York City. These members participated at the invitation 
of the Council. In May of 19G3 new requirements for teachers 
of driver education in Maryland nonpublic specialized schools 
were adopted. Extensive work was done during the period of 
this report to enforce the requirements of Sections 305-9 of 
Article 77 (passed in 1961) concerning the licensing of school 
solicitors. During this period approximately 50 home study 
schools requested materials concerning the solicitors license law. 
As a result some 27 applications for solicitors permits were 
received. Of these applications 17 were denied permits, mainly 
because of the type of contract used. Ten permits were issued 

* Figures are those for all schools listed as operating during the year, 
including new schools and those removed from list during 1962-63 year or 
closed at end of the school year. 

t In the six schools terminating at eighth grade, there were 187 children 
enrolled. This figure is included in the elementary enrollment total. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



105 



to solicitors of three schools. Several additional states, during 
the year 1962-63, enacted legislation similar to the Maryland law 
providing for the licensing of solicitors of out-of-state schools. 
It is anticipated that many more schools will conform to require- 
ments during the next academic year and be eligible for the 
issuance of permits applying to the solicitors employed. 

During the report period approximately 33,000 students 
were enrolled by nonpublic specialized schools operating within 
the State of Maryland and over 1,100 teachers were employed 
by these schools. 

High School Equivalence 

Each year the number of applicants for the Certificate of 
High School Equivalence gi^ows. During the 1962-63 year there 
were 3,149 applicants; 2,595 completed the examinations. Of 
the 1,788 persons applying for the examination for the first time, 
1,004 earned the certificate; of the 807 repeaters, 303 were suc- 
cessful. These figures include 248 applicants at the five penal 
institutions, 112 of whom earned the certificate, and three special 
cases — two blind persons and one paralyzed and confined to 
Baltimore City Hospitals — who received the certificate. In addi- 
tion, the certificate was awarded to 746 applicants who had 
completed the test while in the service under the direction of the 
United States Armed Forces Institute. The Institute forwards 
to the State Department, upon the request of the individual, a 
certified copy of the scores attained. 

Since the enactment in 1941 of the legislation providing for 
the high school equivalence examination and the subsequent 
issuance of the high school equivalence certificate, 27,473 candi- 
dates have completed the examination with scores justifying the 
issuance of the Certificate of High School Equivalence. This 
figure is given as of June, 1963. 

Teacher Recruitment — Scholarship Program 

With the close of the academic year 1961-62 the administra- 
tion of the scholarship program had passed to the newly-created 
State Scholarship Board under the executive directorship of a 
former member of the Division of Certification and Accreditation 
of the State Department of Education. However, the supervisor 
of teacher recruitment of this Department continued to serve 
as a liaison representative of the State Superintendent of Schools 
with the new Board. During the year the staff member assigned 
to this responsibility visited the local school systems and dis- 
cussed with them their problems in teacher recruitment. Visits 
were also made to the various colleges of the State. In these 
visits it became evident that a major difficulty in the recruitment 
of teachers is found in the field of teachers for elementary 
schools. The supply of teachers for the high schools is relatively 



106 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



high when compared with the teachers available for assignment 
to elementary teaching positions. Studies made in the area of 
teacher preparation indicate that there should be a considerable 
improvement in the supply of teachers by 1970. 

The responsibility for the administration of the Maryland 
War Orphans Educational Benefits Program was assigned to 
the staff member working in the field of teacher recruitment. 
This is a continuing program which involves some of the time 
of the supervisor but requires a greater amount of secretarial 
services relative to the program. 

Preparation of materials for public information and legis- 
lative liaison with the State Legislature continued to be functions 
performed by this staff member. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



107 



DIVISION OF ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE 
This Division administers the following programs : 

School Plant Planning 

School Lunch and Direct Distribution of Commodities 

Pupil Transportation 

Driver Education 

Finance 

Personnel 

School Plant Planning 

School building construction continued at a rapid pace to 
meet the needs created at both levels, elementary and secondary, 
by the increasing school population, with added emphasis at the 
secondary level. Replacement and remodeling of obsolete facilities 
made up a substantial portion of the capital expenditures which 
in total amounted to $60,000,000. 

During the year, construction contracts were awarded by 
the local boards of education for 56 elementary schools and 25 
secondary schools. These figures include additions to existing 
buildings as well as totally new plants. 

New school building design reflected trends toward reduc- 
tion in glazed exterior walls, reduction in corridor lengths and 
in perimeter walls, provision of year-round controlled thermal 
environment, and provision for classrooms of varying sizes. 

Compact, air-conditioned school buildings were placed under 
contract in Montgomery and Prince George's counties; under- 
ground classrooms were occupied at the Rocking Horse Ele- 
mentary School in Montgomery County; ground was broken in 
Baltimore City for the Collington Square Elementary School 
with its five-sided classrooms arranged in clusters around an 
inner core; an electrically-heated elementary school opened in 
Garrett County; and Frederick County completed its Earth and 
Space Science Laboratory. 

New sites were approved for the Hagerstown Community 
College, the Harford Community College, the Essex Community 
College, and the Prince George's Community College, construction 
began on new facilities for the Baltimore Junior College and the 
Catonsville Community College, existing facilities at the Allegany 
Community College were renovated ; and planning continued for 
new facilities for the Hagerstown Junior College, the Harford 
Junior College, and the Montgomery Junior College, Rockville 
Campus. 

Through cooperation of the local systems, an inventory of 
school facilities and personnel was made in cooperation with the 
U. S. Office of Education and the U. S. Office of Civil Defense. 
Results of this survey are to become the base for an expanded, 
uniform system of accounting for school facilities. 



108 



Ninety-Se\^nth Annual Report 



School Lunch and Direct Distribution of Commodities 

State-wide there was a 10.2 per cent increase in participation 
in the School Lunch Program in 1962-63 over 1961-62. Only 
three local units had decreases; the other local units shared 
in this increase. 

The rate of reimbursement was reduced from $.04 to $.035, 
effective May 1, 1963. This was necessary because the number 
of lunches served was exceeding the Federal funds available 
for reimbursement of lunches. 

Continued emphasis was given to the importance of in- 
service training programs for school lunch personnel with twenty 
local units holding such programs during the school year. 

In compliance with the National School Lunch Program 
regulations to assure adequacy of program operations, 339 ad- 
ministrative reviews of school lunch operations in individual 
schools were completed in Maryland during the 1962-63 school 
year. 

In the Special Milk Program there was an 8.7 per cent in- 
crease in participation in 1962-63 over 1961-62. 

The Maryland State Department of Education, acting as 
the distributing agency of the U. S. Department of Agriculture, 
allocated Government-donated commodities to the 882 public 
schools and 58 nonpublic schools which participated in the pro- 
gram. The total approximate value of food purchased by the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture, for direct distribution to schools 
in the State of Maryland, was $2,443,000.00. 

Pupil Transportation 

Course offerings in pupil transportation were made available 
to advanced undergraduate and graduate students at Towson 
State College as well as at the University of Maryland, where 
they had been offered previously. The State Department of 
Education has encouraged school principals, vice principals, ad- 
ministrative assistants, and others having responsibility for the 
coordinating of pupil transportation, as well as individuals wish- 
ing to become qualified to hold positions as supervisors of trans- 
portation, to participate in these programs. 

Driver Education 

Special funds for driver education provided through legis- 
lation enacted in 1961 became available for distribution to the 
subdivisions in 1962-63. During the year 90 per cent of the public 
high schools housing the tenth grade offered a driver education 
program to their students, and 32 per cent of the students who 
became 16 years of age participated in some phase of the driver 
education program. 

A new certification requirement for driver education teach- 
ers became effective. In addition to meeting the requirements 



Maryland State Department of Education 



109 



as a teacher in the public schools of Maryland, such a teacher 
must present four semester hours of credit, including course 
work in areas such as driver education, first aid, and general 
safety education, of which a minimum of two semester hours 
or an approved equivalent must have been earned in driver edu- 
cation. In light of these requirements, the University of Mary- 
land and Towson State College made courses available in safety 
education during the regular college year as well as during the 
summer session. 

Finance 

During the 1962-63 fiscal year the State Board of Education 
adopted revised accounting forms for use by the subdivisions 
in reporting their financial operations as required by law. The 
new "Annual Financial Report'' forms and "Annual Budget" 
forms, along with instructions for their use and recommended 
accounting procedures were published in a "Financial Reporting 
Manual for Maryland Public Schools.'' The primary reason for 
the revision is standardization of accounts and terminology for 
improving the accuracy of local. State, and national summaries 
and to facilitate comparisons of financial information among 
counties and states. 

Central collection procedures were established to facilitate 
the administration of student loan accounts originating in the 
State colleges under provisions of Title II of the National De- 
fense Education Act, Public Law 864, 85th Congress. 

Loan accounts are transferred to the State Department of 
Education after the student borrowers leave the colleges. Initial 
date of transfer was December 1, 1962. On that date 293 loan 
accounts were transferred in the amount of $123,834.79. On June 
30, 1963, loan accounts numbered 398 and loan amounts out- 
standing totaled $169,444.35. 

Collection procedures were centralized because loan repay- 
ment terms are reasonably complex. The repayment period is 
basically ten years, but provisions for various deferment and 
payment options require systemization and personnel specializa- 
tion which would be impractical and inefficient in each State 
college. 

Personnel 

As of June 30, 1963, there were 221 employees in the State 
Department of Education, 116 in Headquarters, and 105 in Vo- 
cational Rehabilitation, including the newly-established position 
in the program for the Emplojonent of the Handicapped. During 
the fiscal year eight new positions were established in Head- 
quarters, and six in Vocational Rehabilitation. 



110 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



DIVISION OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT 

The year 1962-63 was the first full year of operation of the 
Division of Research and Development which was created by 
the State Board of Education on November 29, 1961. The addi- 
tion of a Systems Analyst and a Research Assistant to the staff 
made it possible to expand the data processing services within 
the Department and to prepare educational information designed 
for consumption by the general public in addition to the spe- 
cialized reports prepared for administrative purposes. 

Improvements were made in the techniques of gathering 
statistical information from the local school systems through the 
use of electronic data processing equipment, thereby relieving 
principals and teachers from much clerical work in reporting 
information about subject offerings in the secondary schools 
and providing a considerable amount of detail not previously 
available. Emphasis was placed on the preparation of reports 
which would be useful in improving the quality of education 
throughout the State. 

Efforts were also made to consider the statistical reporting 
practices used in other states and the need for comparable infor- 
mation at the national level. By means of improvements in the 
coding structures used in data gathering, it has become possible 
to provide many kinds of interrelated information concerning 
pupils, teachers, curriculum, facilities, and finances. These data 
also provide the basis for analyses of cost-quality relationships, 
staff utilization, teacher preparation and assignments, curriculum 
offerings, and subject enrollments. Much of the work that has 
been done to improve State statistical services has been carried 
out in cooperation with the U. S. Office of Education under the 
provisions of Title X of the National Defense Education Act. 
During this fiscal year, Maryland received from the Federal 
Government the amount of $31,601.01 for this purpose. 

During the year conferences were held in which research 
activities and findings were discussed by outstanding leaders in 
the field. Meetings were also held during the year at which per- 
sons from local school systems discussed research in which they 
were interested. The Division assisted several local school systems 
in the preparation of research proposals which were to be sub- 
mitted to the Federal Government for financial support under 
the Cooperative Research program. 

A Superintendents Committee on Cooperative Studies was 
appointed by the State Superintendent of Schools for the purpose 
of planning pilot projects and trying out new practices, using 
carefully designed data-gathering procedures to obtain statistical- 
ly reliable information for further decision making. The com- 
mittee consists of five local school superintendents and the Direc- 
tor of the Division of Research and Development. 

A pilot project for establishing a model for scheduling a 



Maryland State Department of Education 



111 



large senior high school using an IBM 7090 computer at the 
University of Maryland Computer Science Center was originated 
in cooperation with the Howard County school system. As subject 
offerings have been increased to meet the demands of today's 
society, the problems of scheduling have become more complex 
and time consuming. The use of the computer not only will save 
considerable amount of clerical and administrative time but will 
improve each student's chances of obtaining a schedule suited 
to his needs. 

An increasing number of research reports, particularly those 
carried out by universities and state and local school systems 
under the Cooperative Research Program of the U. S. Office of 
Education were abstracted by the Division of Research and De- 
velopment to be made available to interested persons in the 
Department and in the local school systems in the State. 

The Division furnished an increasing amount of assistance 
to the other divisions of the Department in defining areas of 
investigation, identifying relevant educational information, de- 
signing appropriate data-gathering instruments and procedures, 
processing raw data, analyzing and interpreting processed data, 
formulating inferences, and developing operational conclusions. 

Some of the specific kinds of assistance that the Division 
provided within the Department were the analysis and summari- 
zation of data obtained by Division of Vocational Education 
in its survey of vocational interests among secondary school stu- 
dents; the analysis and summarization of data obtained from 
the survey of modem foreign language teachers, and the prepara- 
tion of statistical data needed in the development of new formulas 
for the distribution of State aid for current expense for public 
schools. 

Educational Television in Maryland 

During the year, the State Board of Education, the State 
Department of Education, the State Educational Television Ad- 
visory Committee, the Superintendents Committee on Educational 
Television, the local school systems, institutions of higher edu- 
cation, and the Maryland Committee for Educational Television 
planned cooperatively for the development of educational tele- 
vision throughout the State. 

In June, 1962, the State Superintendent of Schools wrote 
to the Federal Communications Commission, in connection with 
a proposed rule-making on that agency's part, stating that it 
would be in the best interests of the people of Maryland if no 
further assignment of channels were made until agencies such 
as the Maryland State Department of Education were given an 
opportunity to present plans for educational utilization of tele- 
vision channels presently available. In July, 1962, the State 
Superintendent wrote again to the Federal Communications Com- 
mission on behalf of the State Board of Education, enclosing a 



112 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



copy of the official act of the State Board expressing the interest 
of the Board in the reservation of UHF channels for ETV pur- 
poses in Maryland. 

In September, Governor Tawes, upon the recommendations 
of the Maryland Committee on Educational Television, Dr. Wil- 
son H. Elkins, President of the University of Maryland, and 
Dr. Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., State Superintendent of Schools, 
designated the Maryland State Board of Education as the State 
ETV Agency and established a working committee to be known 
as the Educational Television Advisory Committee to represent 
the broad educational-cultural interests of the State. The mem- 
bers of the ETV Advisory Committee are representatives of the 
State Department of Education, the University of Maryland, 
the Baltimore City Department of Education, the Maryland Li- 
brary Association, the Maryland-D. C. Broadcasters Association, 
the nonpublic institutions of higher learning, and the cultural 
institutions of Maryland. 

The ETV Advisory Committee met to organize itself in 
the fall of 1962, elected the Director of the Division of Research 
and Development as Chairman, and proceeded to study the edu- 
cational, informational, and cultural applications of television 
in Maryland. The initial report and recommendations of the 
Committee to the State Board of Education, acting as the State 
ETV Agency relative to the coordinated development of edu- 
cational television in Maryland, was made in February, 1963. 
At that time the State Board endorsed a request for funds by 
the State Superintendent to the Governor. Subsequently, funds 
were made available for an engineering survey of the State for 
ETV purposes. 

For the remainder of the fiscal year, frequent meetings 
were held with the ETV Advisory Committee, other State agen- 
cies, representatives of the National Educational Television and 
Radio Center, the chief engineers of the three Baltimore com- 
mercial television stations, and others to develop specifications 
for the engineering survey to be made during fiscal 1964. Mean- 
while, the Director continued to work with the Division staff 
and the ETV Advisory Committee, exploring tower site possi- 
bilities in the Baltimore area for the initial station of a State- 
wide ETV network and other aspects of programming and 
financing ETV. 

Throughout fiscal 1963, television continued to be used in 
Maryland as an educational, informational, and cultural medium 
in the Washington County closed-circuit system; the University 
of Maryland closed-circuit program; in Caroline, Dorchester, 
Somerset, Wicomico, and Worcester county schools through a 
leased-time plan with WBOC ; in the Baltimore metropolitan area 
through the cooperation of the three commercial stations, WBAL, 
WJZ, and WMAR; and in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan 
area through arrangement with the educational television sta- 
tion, WETA. 



Maryland State Dep.\rtmext of Education 



113 



DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION 

Statistical and Financial 

The caseload of disabled persons on the rolls of the Maryland 
Division of Vocational Rehabilitation reached an all-time high 
in 1963, with a total of 10,652. Of this number, 4,938 were new 
referrals. Rehabilitation services* were provided to 6,442 clients, 
and 1,722 of these were placed in substantial employment after 
receiving assistance. 

In spite of the fact that approximately one-fourth of the 
counseling staff was new, a larger number of persons were re- 
habilitated into employment than in 1962. This was the four- 
teenth year out of the past twenty in which the previous year's 
record was surpassed. 

The Vocational Rehabilitation program cost over $1,500,000 
in 1963, of which 43 per cent was paid by the State of Maryland 
and the remainder by the Federal government. Had the 1,722 
rehabilitated cases and their dependents been on welfare rolls, 
the cost would have almost equaled the amount spent on the 
entire program. As it was, these rehabilitated persons had the 
potential for earning almost $4,500,000 in the year following the 
closing of their cases. 

Follow-up of 1960 Rehabilitated Cases 

Continuing the practice re-established a few years ago, the 
Division in 1963 conducted a follow-up survey of clients re- 
habilitated in 1960. In that year, the total cost of the Vocational 
Rehabilitation program in Maryland was $1,036,534. Of this 
amount. State funds accounted for $451,725 and Federal funds 
for $584,809. During the year, 5,743 clients were served by the 
Division. Of this number, 1,413 were rehabilitated into employ- 
ment in 1960. Many of the others who were served were re- 
habilitated into employment in subsequent years. As a result 
of the follow-up survey, complete information was obtained on 
815 of the clients who were rehabilitated in 1960. The total 
earnings of these 815 rehabilitants over the three-year period 
amounted to $4,763,669 or 13 and one-half times the cost of 
their rehabilitation, which was $347,190, four and one-half times 
the total cost of the rehabilitation program in 1960. 

Of the remaining 598 rehabilitants, it is known that they 
earned $512,310 before their cases were closed. Therefore, the 
total known earnings for the 1,413 rehabilitants have been 
$5,275,979 or 9 times the cost of their rehabilitation, 5 times 



* Each client received one or more of the following: counseling, medical 
evaluation, physical restoration, vocational training, prosthetic appliances, 
maintenance, occupational tools and equipment, placement. 



114 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



the total cost of the program in 1960. It is a reasonable assumption 
that the 598 worked on an average for at least one year at their 
average annual rate at closure. This being true, the 1,413 re- 
habilitants earned in their first year of employment $3,042,798 
or 5 times the cost of their rehabilitation, and 3 times the total 
cost of the program in 1960. 

Governor's Committee 

Joint efforts with other agencies continued to be an impor- 
tant factor in the broadening and improving of services. The 
Division cooperated actively with the Governor's Committee to 
Promote Employment of the Handicapped, particularly on the 
Eastern Shore, where two employer advisory committees are 
active and a third is being organized. Revisions were made in 
a number of cooperative agreements with other organizations, 
such as the Baltimore League for Crippled Children and the 
Baltimore Goodwill Industries. Staff members worked with pub- 
lic and private agencies in the development of sheltered work- 
shops. A comprehensive survey of workshop needs and potential 
was conducted on the lower Eastern Shore, and another is being 
planned for the Upper Shore. Division personnel contributed 
materially to rehabilitation education throughout the State, 
through lectures to medical and nursing students, school counse- 
lors, public health nurses, social workers, and many other groups. 

Occupational Therapy 

In Montgomery County, the program for training occupa- 
tional therapy aides was brought to a successful conclusion, 
the needs of the community having been met for the time being. 
A similar program is being developed in the Metropolitan Balti- 
more area. Also in Montgomery County, the District Supervisor 
and one counselor worked closely with the Board of Education 
during the first year of a research and demonstration project, 
which is experimenting with a work-oriented curriculum for 
adolescent, disabled public school students. 

Group Counseling 

One of the most significant new approaches to the rehabili- 
tation problems of the disabled was the institution of group 
counseling of clients in the Metropolitan and Southern Maryland 
districts. This program is financed in part by a research and 
demonstration grant from the Vocational Rehabilitation Ad- 
ministration, which will be continued for two more years. The 
results in the first year were most encouraging and interest in 
the program has been manifested throughout the country. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



115 



Prisons 

Another step in a new direction was a modest beginning 
in providing rehabilitation services to inmates of penal institu- 
tions who have disabilities which are vocational handicaps and 
who are reasonably close to parole, and who seem to be good 
candidates for employment. During the year, arrangements for 
these services were concluded with the Maryland Penitentiary in 
Baltimore and the Maryland Institute for Males in Breathedsville. 

Public Welfare 

The Division has united with the Department of Public 
Welfare and the Maryland State Employment Service in develop- 
ing a program for rehabilitating the disabled and unemployed 
coal miners in Western Maryland who have been clients of all 
three agencies for many years without being able to attain 
satisfactory vocational adjustment. 

District Activities 

In the Metropolitan District, a counselor was assigned full 
time to the University of Maryland HospitaFs Rehabilitation 
Unit. His duties are to provide rehabilitation service to voca- 
tionally handicapped patients and to act as consultant to the 
unit and to physicians, nurses, and social workers throughout 
the hospital. 

On the Eastern Shore, two evaluation clinics were held at 
which, through a concentration of medical, psychological, and 
interviewing procedures, relatively large numbers of clients 
were evaluated with great economy of time and money. 

The Blind 

In the area of services to the blind, the Division is especially 
gratified with the progress made during the year in the program 
for vending stands operated by blind persons in Federal build- 
ings. In this program, which is managed by the Maryland Work- 
shop for the BKnd as nominee of the Division, the number of 
stands was increased from 18 to 25, a gain of almost 40 per cent. 
The gross income accruing to these stands was approximately 
$808,000. 

Disability Determinations — OASI 

In the Disability Determination Program, conducted under 
contract with the Social Security Administration, the caseload 
remained about the same as in the preceding year, but concentra- 
tion on increased accuracy and documentation of determinations 
resulted in a higher quality of work. An educational program 
was conducted among the participating physicians regarding 
the nature of the information required. This was successful to 



116 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



the extent that because of the excellent medical documentation, 
only two consultants were called upon for personal testimony 
at the appeals level during the year. The addition to denial 
determinations of a paragraph explaining in lay language the 
reason for denial of claims also resulted in a reduction of the 
total number of appeals made. An increased number of cases 
was referred to vocational rehabilitation, and a larger per cent 
of these were accepted for services than previously. 

Staff Development 

The staff training program was continued throughout the 
year, with several counselors attending Prosthetic and Orthotic 
Institutes and orientation programs sponsored by the Regional 
Office of the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration. The 1963 
annual staff training conference of the Division was concentrated 
on medical problems under the leadership of a group of outstand- 
ing medical specialists. In addition, the various district super- 
visors conducted regular staff training programs within their 
districts throughout the year. Four offices of the Division moved 
into new quarters during 1963: the Metropolitan Baltimore 
Office, the district offices in Hyattsville and Salisbury, and the 
local office in Rockville. 

Television 

"Comeback," the public service program sponsored by the 
Division over WMAR-TV in Baltimore, completed its eleventh 
year of continuous broadcasting on February 23, 1963. This pro- 
gram still has a large audience scattered throughout Maryland 
and adjoining states. It is the first and only telecast of its kind 
in the country. More than 300 disabled persons have been hon- 
ored for their ''comeback" from the effects of physical disability. 
Numerous physicians, employers, and other interested citizens 
have been guests, also. 

Injured Workers' Rehabilitation Committee 

This committee was created by an Act of the General As- 
sembly of 1960, in an effort to strengthen further the State*s 
program of Vocational Rehabilitation by acting as an advisory 
to the Workmen's Compensation Commission "with respect to 
all phases of rehabilitation of injured workers.*' 

The committee visited the Workmen's Compensation Com- 
mission in New York City, the Institute of Physical Medicine 
and Rehabilitation, and the Institute for the Crippled and Dis- 
abled, also in New York, in 1963, to study their programs. 

As a result of the activities of the committee during the 
past year, a special recommendation was submitted to the Gov- 
ernor regarding a broader organization for rehabilitation within 
the Workmen's Compensation Commission. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



117 



TABLE 1 — Actual Days Schools Were Open: Opening and Closing Dates: 
Maryland Public Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1963 





Number 








Number 






Local Unit 


Actual 


Opening 


Closing 




Actual 


Opening 


Closing 


Days 


Dates 


Dates 


Local Unit 


Days 


Dates 


Dates 




Schools 


September, 


June, 




Schools 


September, 


June, 




Were Open 


1962 


1963 




Were Open 


1962 


1963 


Allegany 


185 


5 


14 


Harford 


180 


5 


14 


Anne Arundel . . 


183 


6 


14 


Howard 


182 


6 


14 


Baltimore City. 


185 


6 


18 


Kent 


183 


5 


13 


Baltimore 


184 


6 


20 










Calvert 


183 


7 


14 


Montgomery. . 


185 


4 


19 










Pr. George's. . 


183 


4 


14 


Caroline 


181 


6 


10 


Queen Anne's. 


184 


6 


14 


Carroll 


183 


4 


14 


St. Mary's.... 


182 


5 


14 


Cecil 


184 


4 


14 




184 


4 


7 


Charles 


183 


6 


14 










181 


4 


7 


Talbot 


182 


4 


14 








Washington . . . 


183 


6 


14 


Frederick 


181 


6 


14 




185 


4 


7 


Garrett 


180 


4 


12 


Worcester .... 


183 


4 


10 



118 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 2— Fall Enrollment— Grades N-12, Teaching Staff, Number of Schools: 
Public and Nonpublic: State of Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1963 



Type of School 


Grand Total 


Elementary 


High 


enrollment 


Total 

Public* 


809, 049 
668, 682 
140,367 


502,359 
388, 309 
114,050 


306, 690 
280, 373 
26,317 


TEACHING STAFF 


Total 


33, 260 
28, 171 
5,089 






Public* 


14, 572 


13, 599 








NUMBER OF SCHOOLS 


Total tl,529 

Public* i tl, 071 

Nonpublic t458 

1 


1,260 
844 
416 


402 
285 
117 



* Includes enrollment, teaching staff, and number of campus schools at State Teachers Colleges, 
t Excludes duplicates. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



119 



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Special 
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6,003 
6,453 
7,326 
4,722 
5,276 
6,239 
7,528 
8,396 
9,473 
13, 104 




































































26, 552 
29, 03£ 
31,291 
35, 192 
38,354 
37,831 
39,291 
44,778 
52,981 
53,152 




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30,171 
32,167 
36,314 
39,322 
38,383 
40,361 
44,315 
52,613 
52, 595 
52, 563 


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280, 634 
293,278 
305,983 
317,385 
331, 619 
341,259 
348,291 
357,708 
370, 551 
387, 184 




147,658 
161, 597 
175, 738 
189,651 

214,475 
232,802 
249, 101 
264,253 
280, 344 
















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128 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



129 



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Physically 
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Damage 


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130 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of E^ducation 131 



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Grand 
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Schools 
with 
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132 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 





Othert 


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Teachers 




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Maryland State Department of Education 



133 







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138 Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 

TABLE 22 



Withdrawals* from Public Schools: Counties of Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1963 







Withdrawals by CoDEf 


Local Unit 


Total 


Transferred to 
Other Schools 


























Wl 


W2 


W3&4 


W7 


W13 


W5 


W6 


W8 


W9 


WIO 


Wll 


W12 


W14 



ELEMENTARY 



Total Counties 


24 


312 


1 

!9, 088 

i 


360 


14,158 


64 


54 


193 




23 


25 


343 


4 






Allegany 




557 


! 276 


4 


258 


1 


3 


8 








7 








Anne Arundel .... 


3 


085 


1 987 


23 


1,980 


11 


5 


29 




'8 


■3 


38 


i 






Baltimore 


3 


790 


1, 308 


52 


2, 293 


15 




54 




1 


2 


56 








Calvert 




215 


65 




139 


1 










2 


4 








Caroline 




164 


39 




120 


1 




'4 
















Carroll 




405 


153 




217 


4 




13 




2 




16 








Cecil 




819 


285 


6 


509 




■i 


5 




2 




11 








Charles 




394 


71 


6 


303 


i 




3 




2 




8 












160 


34 




121 












i 


3 








Frederick 




646 


310 


3 


305 






8 






2 


18 






•• 


Garrett 




137 


38 


6 


84 




1 






3 


1 


3 






Harford 


1 


487 


536 


4 


902 




2 


14 . . 






26 


i 




Howard 




447 


66 


4 


358 


\ 


1 


2 i . . 






15 








Kent 




123 


27 




89 




1 






"i 


2 








Montgomery 


4 


200 


1,869 


153 


2,102 


4 


11 


13 






6 


41 


i 






Prince George's. . 
Queen Anne's. . . . 


5 


028 


2,015 


S6 


2,839 


8 


8 


25 






3 


44 










121 


27 




87 




3 










4 








St Mary's 




575 


161 


3 


398 




1 


'9 








3 








Somerset 




139 


17 




114 




1 










6 


i 






Talbot 




176 


61 


3 


97 


"7 


1 








"i 


6 








Washington 




877 


445 


6 


399 




1 


4 




2 


3 


17 












543 


264 


1 


262 


'4 




2 




2 




8 








Worcester 




224 


34 

1 


■■ 


182 










1 




7 









HIGH 



Total Counties 


15, 


548 


2,397 


78 


6,035 


391 


49 


275 


232 


4,661 


42 


707 


75 


588 


18 


Allegany 




394 


55 


1 


112 


4 


4 


10 


9 


120 


1 


27 


2 


48 


1 


Anne Arimdel .... 


2 


054 


228 


18 


782 


67 


2 


49 


30 


711 


6 


96 


6 


58 


1 




2 


688 


381 


11 


1, 026 


85 


12 


88 


58 


855 


5 


74 


17 






Calvert 




151 


5 


1 


47 


3 


1 


1 


2 


81 




5 


5 






Caroline 




153 


6 




46 


6 


2 


1 


1 


68 




16 




6 


1 


Carroll 




269 


43 




82 


7 




12 


1 


85 




22 


3 


13 


1 


Cecil 




475 


54 


'7 


165 


9 




7 


8 


172 


'2 


17 


2 


30 


2 


Charles 




275 1 


19 


1 


105 


I 


'3 


3 


4 


107 




18 




9 




Dorchester 




147 


2 




76 










48 




13 


"i 


5 




Frederick 




534 


85 


5 


127 


5 


1 


'9 


'2 


226 


i5 


22 


13 


22 


'2 


Garrett 




123 


4 




49 


6 




2 


4 


44 




7 


2 


5 




Harford 




847 


128 


'2 


403 


23 


'2 


17 


8 


175 


'3 


36 


9 


38 


3 


Howard 




318 


11 




164 


8 


6 


2 


15 


78 


2 


15 




17 




Kent 




86 


6 




29 


3 


1 


1 


2 


31 




6 




6 


i 






252 


587 


■9 


938 


40 


6 


23 


39 


389 


6 


125 


6 


80 


4 


Prince George's. . 
Queen Anne's. . . . 


2 


967 


604 


11 


1,210 


79 


9 


20 


24 


827 




85 


1 


97 






141 


3 




57 


1 








68 




3 




9 




St. Mary's 




303 


18 


'7 


156 


6 






'5 


91 




9 




11 




Somerset 




129 






35 


4 




8 


3 


57 




9 




13 




Talbot 




139 


"3 


'i 


57 


7 




4 


1 


46 


"i 


13 




6 




Washington 




614 


131 


4 


172 


12 




9 


4 


240 




31 




11 






311 


18 




127 


8 




8 


3 


95 


i 


36 




15 








178 


6 




70 






1 


9 


47 




22 


"8 


13 


"2 



* Withdrawals who did not re-enter during 1962-63 the school from which they withdrew — excluding kindergarten, 
t Codes: Wl — Transferred — public school in county W6 — Armed services 

W2 — Transferred — nonpublic school in coimty W8 — Age 16 or over 

W3 & 4 — Transferred — outside county W9 — Mental 

W7 — Committed to institution WIO — Physical 

W13 — Death Wll — Economic 

W5 — Special case W12— Marriage 

W14 — Suspended 



Maryland State Department of Education 139 



TABLE 23 — Number and Per Cent Nonpromotions ; Maryland County High 
School Pupils: June Net Roll, 1963 



June Net Roll 



Local Unit 


Total 


Promoted 


Not Promoted 


Per Cent 
not Promoted 


Total Counties 


205,805 


195,819 


9,986 


4.9 


Allegany 


8,317 


8,121 


196 


2.3 


Anne Arundel 


19,275 


18,196 


1,079 


5.6 




42,456 


40,713 


1,743 


4.1 


Calvert 


1,694 


1,642 


52 


3.1 




1,903 


1,872 


31 


1.6 


Carroll 


5,044 


4,857 


187 


3.7 


Cecil 


3,959 


3,691 


268 


6.8 


Charles 


3.260 


2,863 


397 


12.2 




2,727 


2, 568 


159 


5.8 




6,756 


6,500 


256 


3.8 


Garrett 


2,022 


1,962 


60 


3.0 


Harford 


7,644 


7,228 


416 


5.4 




3,936 


3,805 


131 


3.3 


Kent 


1,413 


1,318 


95 


6.7 




37,221 


35,825 


1,396 


3.7 




34, 678 


32,274 


2,404 


6.9 


1,622 


1.420 


202 


12.5 


St. Mary's 


2, 594 


2,386 


208 


8.0 


Somerset 


1.836 


1,738 


98 


5.3 


Talbot 


1,764 


1,692 


72 


4.1 


Washington 


8,935 


8, 660 


275 


3.1 




4,430 


4,255 


175 


3.9 




2. 319 


2.233 


86 


3.7 



Note: Policy of promotion and nonpromotion varies in the different counties. 



140 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 24 — Number, Per Cent, and Causes of Nonpromotion : Maryland 
County Elementary Pupils*: June Net Roll, 1963 









Number not Promoted by Cause 




Total 


Per Cent 










Local Unit 


not 


not 












Promoted 


Promoted 


Personal 


Irregiilar 


Imma- 


All Other 








Illness 


Atten- 


turityt 


Causes 














Total Counties 


11, 399 


4.3 


146 


406 


9,860 


987 


Allegany 


82 


1.0 


4 


2 


75 


1 




1,382 


5.0 


14 


49 


1,303 


16 




3, 549 


6.7 


36 


41 


2,823 


649 


Calvert 


223 


7.6 


3 


11 


209 




Caroline 


140 


5.3 




11 


129 




Carroll 


233 


3.7 


2 


12 


216 


3 


Cecil 


431 


7.3 


7 


23 


397 


4 


Charles 


473 


10.0 


6 


58 


405 


4 




52 


1.5 


3 




49 




Frederick 


94 


1.2 


8 


'7 


75 


'4 




160 


5.8 


1 


22 


137 






587 


5.7 


2 


19 


509 


57 




199 


4.0 


4 


3 


188 


4 


Kent 


80 


4.1 


2 


4 


66 


8 


Montgomery 


907 


1.9 


19 


39 


641 


208 


Queen Anne's 


1,562 


3.3 


23 


67 


1,469 


3 


58 


2.6 


1 


4 


52 


1 


St. Mary's 


277 


7.3 


3 


26 


239 


9 




162 


6.5 


1 


1 


151 


9 


Talbot 


150 


6.1 


1 


2 


147 




Washington 


165 


1.6 


1 


1 


156 


7 




313 


4.8 


1 


2 


310 




Worcester 


120 


3.7 


4 


2 


114 





* Excludes kindergarten and pupils attending campus schools at State Teachers Colleges, 
t Irregular attendance due to unfortimate home conditions. 
t Immaturity — social, intellectual, emotional. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



141 



TABLE 25 — Number and Per Cent of Nonpromotions in First Grade* : 
Counties of Maryland: June Net Roll, 1963 



Local Unit 


First Grade Enrollment 


Number and Per Cent not Promoted 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Number 


Per Cent 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total Counties. . 


48, 471 


25,231 


23,240 


4,250 


2,713 


1,537 


8.8 


10.7 


6.6 




1,366 


730 


636 


45 


24 


21 


3.3 


3.3 


3.3 


Anne Arundel . 


5,176 


2,676 


2,500 


635 


398 


237 


12.3 


14.9 


9.5 




9,631 


5, 027 


4, 604 


1,022 


665 


357 


10.6 


13.2 


7.7 


Calvert 


508 


270 


238 


50 


30 


20 


9.8 


11.1 


8.4 


Caroline 


505 


243 


262 


58 


32 


26 


11.5 


13.2 


9.9 


Carroll 


1,165 


603 


562 


98 


71 


27 


8.4 


11.8 


4.8 


Cecil 


1,225 


659 


566 


228 


141 


87 


18.6 


21.4 


15.4 


Charles 


988 


536 


452 


193 


119 


74 


19.5 


22.2 


16.4 


Dorchester. . . . 


638 


332 


306 


31 


19 


12 


4.9 


5.7 


3.9 


Frederick 


1,450 


739 


711 


56 


32 


24 


3.9 


4.3 


3.4 


Garrett 


503 


249 


254 


50 


34 


16 


9.9 


13.7 


6.3 




1,880 


1,011 


869 


184 


123 


61 


9.8 


12.2 


7.0 


Howard 


922 


488 


434 


108 


77 


31 


11.7 


15.8 


7.1 


Kent 


361 


183 


178 














Montgomery. . 


7,307 


3,805 


3,502 


328 


2ii 


lii 


4^5 


5^5 


3^3 


Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. 


8,989 


4,642 


4,347 


732 


454 


278 


8.1 


9.8 


6.4 


487 


260 


227 


6 


4 


2 


1.2 


1.5 


0.9 


St. Mary's 


765 


409 


356 


89 


60 


29 


11.6 


14.7 


8.1 


Somerset 


454 


232 


222 


65 


43 


22 


14.3 


18.5 


9.9 


Talbot 


517 


271 


246 


69 


35 


34 


13.3 


12.9 


13.8 


Washington. . . 


1,883 


971 


912 


40 


25 


15 


2,1 


2.6 


1.6 




1,153 


582 


571 


97 


67 


30 


8.4 


11.5 


5.3 




598 


313 


285 


66 


49 


17 


11.0 


15.7 


6.0 



* Excludes pupils in first grade of campus schools at State Teachers Colleges. 



142 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 26— Public High School Graduates: State of Maryland— 1954-63 : 
by Local Unit— Year Ending June 30, 1963 



High School Graduates 



Year and Local Unit 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 




14 070 


D, D < U 


7 Ann 




lO, IDJ. 




7 QAQ 




16 767 


8 019 


8 748 


1956-57 


17,' 122 


8*368 


8^754 


1957-58 


18,380 


8, 891 


9,489 


1958-59 


20 462 


9 861 


10 601 




23 854 


11 560 


12 294 


1 QfiO— fil 




13 142 


1 Q 781 


1961-62 


26, 533 


13', 015 


13, 518 


1962-63 


28, 534 


14,299 


14,235 


■RV 




—Do 




Allegany 


992 


503 


489 


Anne Arundel 


1,800 


882 


918 


Baltimore City 


6,469 


3,337 


3,132 


Baltimore 


4,625 


2,312 


2,313 


Calvert 


158 


76 


82 


Caroline 


214 


100 


114 


Carroll 


565 


252 


313 


Cecil 


402 


194 


208 


Charles 


355 


180 


175 


Dorchester 


325 


165 


160 




719 


379 


340 


Garrett 


238 


119 


119 


Harford 


771 


402 


369 


Howard 


361 


176 


185 




143 


67 


76 


Montgomery 


4,384 


2,117 


2,267 


Prince George's 


3,509 


1,773 


1,736 


181 


85 


96 




260 


122 


138 




188 


87 


101 


Talbot 


202 


100 


102 




939 


505 


434 




499 


249 


250 




235 


117 


118 



Maryland State 



Department 



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173 



TABLE 46 — Driver Education Enrollment : Maryland Public High Schools : 

Fall of 1962 







Driver Education 




Total Driver 




1 




Local Unit 


Education 






Classroom 






Classroom 


Practice 


and 










Practice 


Total State 


: 7,401 


2, 873 


560 


3,968 




493 






493 




















1, 124 


203 


96 


825 


Calvert 


51 






51 




156 


38 




118 


Carroll* 










Cecil 


34i 


34 i 


















i24 


'22 


62 


*46 


Frederick 


616 


616 








292 


287 


■ 5 






508 


252 




256 


Howard* 










Kent 


i59 


63 




96 




1,275 


242 


233 


800 


Prince George's 


661 


20 


20 


621 


165 


75 


4 


86 


St. Mary's 


213 






213 




137 


75 


22 


40 


Talbot* 










Washington 


308 






308 




679 


56i 


iis 






99 


78 




21 



* Driver Education in these units is offered during out-of-school hours only. 



174 Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 47 — Number of Different Individuals Teaching and Number of Public High Schools 
Offering Each Subject; State of Maryland: Fall of 1962 



Local Unit 


English 


Latin 


French 


Spanish 


Other 
Foreign 
Lan- 
guages 


Social 
Studies 


Mathe- 
matics 


Science 


Business 
Educa- 
tion 


Arts 
and 
Crafts 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 




CO 

-a 


m 
O 


m 

-a 

o 


o 
o 


tn 
o 


o 


S 

o 


"o 

o 


03 
U 


o 
o 


J3 


"o 

o 


"3 


o 


2 


o 




o 


m 
o 







s 

fc-" 


■s 






c3 


ja 


03 
3) 


o 




JS 


c3 

Ol 


J3 
o 


cS 


"M 




1 


1 


-G 


0) 

H 


ja 

OJ 


Total State 


3,320 


292 


142 


121 


411 


221 


163 


107 


40 


34 


2,689 


290 


1,870 


291 


1.898 


293 


839 


175 


113 


80 


A 11 

Allegany 


92 


11 


7 


5 


7 


g 


3 


2 


*1 


*j 


85 




57 




4Q 

ty 


1 1 

i L 




o 
o 


A 

4 


4 


Anne Arundel . 


296 


16 


6 


5 


28 


13 


5 


4 


*2 


*2 


257 


16 


192 


16 
52 


117 


14 


53 


8 


4 


3 


Baltimore City 


585 


52 


27 


18 


77 


33 


33 


21 


*19 


*14 


493 


52 


396 


370 


57 


202 


34 


29 


17 




586 


29 


18 


20 


56 


29 


41 


24 


t2 


t3 


512 


29 


246 


29 


269 


29 


89 


13 


3 


2 


Calvert 


29 


4 


1 


1 


3 


3 






*1 


*1 


21 


4 


14 


4 


14 


4 


10 


2 


2 


2 


„ ,. 


39 


8 


2 


2 


4 


7 


1 


1 






27 


8 


18 


8 


24 


8 


14 


3 






Carroll 


63 


11 


1 


1 

3 


9 


8 










49 


11 


42 


11 


41 


11 


25 


7 


'6 


'4 


Cecil 


51 


7 


3 


4 


4 


2 


2 






54 


7 


35 


7 


38 


7 


24 


6 


3 


3 


onaries 


48 


8 


2 


2 


4 


4 










38 
30 


8 


27 


8 


31 


8 


14 


4 


4 


4 


Dorchester. . . . 


31 


7 




3 


4 


3 










7 


22 


7 


25 


7 


12 


4 


3 


3 


Frederick 


104 


9 




6 


11 


8 


1 


1 






86 


9 


53 


9 


49 


9 


26 


6 


8 


6 


Garrett 


29 


5 






2 


2 










22 


5 


16 


5 


17 


5 


8 


2 


5 


4 


Harford 


110 


8 


6 


h 


12 


7 


5 


3 






92 


8 


61 


8 


63 


8 


32 


7 


12 


7 


Howard 


44 


7 


2 


2 


7 


5 


2 


2 






32 


7 


22 


7 


30 


7 


11 


3 


2 


1 


Kent 


23 


4 


2 


2 


4 


4 










22 


4 


16 


4 


15 


4 


9 


4 


2 


2 


Montgomery. . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 


420 
475 
26 
34 
23 

20 
101 
57 
34 


30 
34 
4 
6 
7 

3 
12 
6 
4 


30 
10 

1 

1 

8 
5 

1 1 


25 
8 

i 
1 

6 
4 
1 


95 
45 
4 
4 
8 

4 
9 
6 
4 


29 
25 
4 
4 
5 

2 
7 
6 

3 


21 
37 

2 


12 
21 

2 


'7 

te 


*7 

u 


284 
335 
23 
29 
25 

18 
78 
47 
30 


29 
33 
4 
6 
7 

3 
12 

6 
4 


248 
203 
15 
23 
22 

15 
70 
40 
17 


29 
34 
4 
6 
7 

3 
12 
6 
4 


199 
347 
13 
29 
21 

15 
61 
40 
21 


29 
33 
4 
6 
7 

3 
12 
6 
4 


86 
104 
11 
11 
13 

9 
22 
15 
11 


18 
13 
4 
5 
6 

3 
7 
4 

4 


18 
'2 

i 
2 
3 


10 
"2 

i 

2 

3 


Washington. . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 


7 
3 


10 
2 


*2 


*2 

















Home 


Physical 










Adminis- 












Art 


Music 


Agricul- 


Eco- 


Educa- 


Industrial 


Driver 


tration 


Guidance 


Library 












ture 


nomics 


tion 


Work 


Education 


Supervision 












Number 


Number 


Number 


Number 


Number 


Number 


Number 


Number 


Number 


Number 


Local Unit 


of 




of 




of 


of 


of 




of 




of 




of 




of 


of 




e 




S 




2 




CO 




2 




2 








m 




2 




CO 






a> 
M 
u 


ools 




ools 




ools 


a) 
-a 
u 


ools 




a? 

"o 




a> 






a3 
"0 


CO 

"o 






en 

8 















OS 


-a 

CQ 


1 








02 


Tea 


s 


Tea 






ja 


a> 


-c) 


cS 
<u 




1 
H 


-a 


cS 


"0 


Total State 


447 


229 


679 


283 


66 


60 


643 


269 


1,179 


289 


984 


265 


119 


103 


658 


282 


638 


267 


348 


266 


Allegany 


9 


7 


19 


11 


1 




20 


9 


33 


11 


27 


9 


7 


6 


19 


11 


10 


7 


12 


9 


Anne Arundel . 


36 


16 


47 


16 


1 




42 


12 


64 


16 


51 


13 






37 


16 


33 


16 


20 


15 


Baltimore City 


111 


41 


112 


48 






167 


46 


232 


49 


357 


47 






99 


43 


155 


43 


51 


39 


Baltimore 


79 


29 


99 


29 


i 




84 


29 


169 


29 


120 


29 


18 


i3 


94 


29 


95 


29 


59 


29 


Calvert 


3 


3 


8 


4 


1 




4 


3 


13 


4 


3 


3 


2 


2 


13 


4 


4 


4 


5 


4 


Caroline 


7 


6 


12 


8 


4 


3 


9 


8 


18 


8 


8 


7 


2 


3 


10 


8 


9 


8 


8 


8 


Carroll 


4 


4 


22 


11 


5 


4 


16 


11 


31 


11 


20 


10 






20 


11 


11 


9 


11 


11 


Cecil 


6 


6 


10 


7 


2 


2 


11 


7 


26 


7 


13 


7 


6 


■5 


14 


7 


11 


7 


7 


6 


Charles 


4 


3 


14 


8 


6 


5 


11 


7 


20 


8 


7 


5 






13 


8 


7 


6 


8 


8 


Dorchester 


3 


3 


10 


6 


2 


2 


5 


4 


19 


7 


5 


4 


'3 


'3 


13 


7 


6 


4 


5 


5 




13 


9 


24 


9 


6 


5 


17 


9 


37 


9 


16 


9 


7 


7 


19 


9 


17 


9 


11 


9 


Garrett 


1 


1 


6 


3 


3 


2 


5 


2 


12 


5 


4 


2 


1 




6 


4 


3 


2 




2 


Harford 


9 


7 


21 


8 


3 


2 


16 


8 


26 


8 


24 


8 


7 


7 


17 


8 


12 


8 


9 


8 


Howard 


3 


3 


16 


7 


2 


2 


11 


7 


21 


7 


15 


7 






14 


7 


8 


6 


7 


7 


Kent 


1 


3 


8 


4 


2 


2 


6 


4 


8 


4 


5 


4 


'3 


'4 


6 


4 


5 


4 


4 


4 


M ontgomery . . 


54 


29 


78 


30 


4 


4 


67 


30 


183 


30 


128 


30 


24 


14 


104 


30 


125 


30 


48 


29 


Prince George's 


77 


34 


98 


34 


3 


3 


93 


34 


170 


34 


109 


34 


13 


13 


90 


34 


75 


34 


35 


34 


Queen Anne's. 






8 


4 


3 


3 


5 


4 


8 


4 


3 


3 


4 


4 


5 


4 


6 


4 


4 


4 


St. Mary's 


6 


6 


11 


6 


2 


2 


6 


6 


12 


6 


7 


6 


4 


5 


11 


6 


6 


6 


6 
11 


6 


Somerset 


1 


1 


5 


5 


2 


2 


4 


4 


13 


7 


3 


3 






7 


7 


7 


6 


5 


Talbot 






6 


3 


3 


2 


5 


3 


8 


3 


6 


3 


2 


2 


7 


3 


4 


3 


3 


3 


Washington. . . 


io 


"8 


26 


12 


5 


4 


24 


12 


31 


12 


34 


12 


7 


7 


23 


12 


15 


12 


11 


11 


Wicomico 


7 


6 


11 


6 


3 


4 


8 


6 


16 


6 


12 


6 


5 


2 


11 


6 


9 


6 


6 


6 


Worchester. . . 


3 


4 


8 


4 


2 


3 


7 


4 


9 


4 


7 


4 


4 


4 


6 


4 


5 


4 


4 


4 



t Includes 1 teachers and 2 schools teaching Russian and 1 teacher and 1 school teaching German in Baltimore County. 
t Includes 2 teachers and 2 schools teaching Russian and 4 teachers and 2 schools teaching German in Prince George's County. 
Note: In those units that have teachers of and schools offering Special Education both have been added to the subject fields where ap- 
plicable. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



175 



TABLE 48 — Average Number Belonging per Teacher and Principal ; 
State of Maryland; 1954-1963 



Year and 
Local Unit 


Average Number Belonoing per Teacher 
and Principal 


Total 


Elementary* 


High 


1954 


27 


4 


31 


5 


22 





1955 


26 


8 


30 


4 


22 





1956 


26 


8 


30 


4 


22 





1957 


26 


3 


30 





21 


7 


1958 


25 


1 


28 





21 


5 


1959 


24 


6 


27 


3 


21 


4 


1960 


24 


2 


26 


9 


21 


2 


1961 


23 


9 


26 


6 


21 





1962 


25 


1 


28 


2 


21 


9 


1963 


23 


1 


25 


7 


20 


3 


BY LOCAL UNIT, 


1962-63 










Allegany 


24 


1 


25 


4 


23 


2 


Anne Arundel 


23 


9 


25 


7 


21 


7 


Baltimore City 


24 


6 


27 


8 


21 


2 




21 


6 


22 


7 


20 


4 


Calvert 


23 


4 


26 


8 


19 


2 




21 


8 


27 


3 


17 


2 


Carroll 


23 


4 


26 


6 


20 


4 


Cecil 


24 


1 


26 


9 


20 


8 


Charles 


23 


7 


27 


7 


19 


8 




24 


6 


27 


9 


21 


3 




21 


1 


22 


9 


19 


3 




24 


8 


25 


6 


23 


8 


Harford 


24 


2 


26 


8 


21 


5 




23 


6 


26 





21 


2 


Kent 


21 


6 


25 





18 


2 


Montgomery 


21 


4 


23 


3 


19 


5 


Prince George's 


22 


7 


27 


3 


18 


5 


22 


1 


25 


9 


18 


4 


St. Mary's 


23 


6 


28 


5 


18 


9 




22 


7 


26 


1 


19 


3 


Talbot 


23 


3 


26 


7 


19 


7 




24 


5 


26 


9 


22 


1 


Wicomico 


24 


4 


27 


7 


20 


9 




23 


2 


26 


9 


19 


5 



* Excludes kindergarten and campus schools at State Teachers Colleges. 



176 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 49— Number and Per Cent of Schools, Teachers, Pupils : One-Teacher* 
Elementary Schools : Counties of Maryland : 1923-1963 



One-Teacher Elementary Schools* 



Year Ending 












June 30 


Number of 


Per Cent of 


Per Cent of 


Pupils in One- 


Per Cent of 




One-Teacher 


Total Ele- 


Total Ele- 


Teacher 


Total Ele- 




Schools 


mentary 


mentary 


Schools 


mentary 






Schools 


Teachers 




Pupils 


1923 


1,496 


69.9 


39.6 


t 




1928 


1,206 


65.1 


31.7 


t 




1933 


740 


53.2 


20.3 


t 




1938 


560 


48.1 


15.4 


t 




1943 


275 


31.4 


7.8 


7,546 


h'.s 


1954 


50 


7.5 


0.8 


1,295 


0.7 


1955 


30 


4,5 


0.5 


753 


0.4 


1956 


24 


3.7 


0.3 


595 


0.3 


1957 


23 


3.9 


0.3 


584 


0.3 


1958 


17 


2.1 


0.3 


410 


0.2 


1959 


11 


1.2 


0.1 


278 


0.1 


1960 


12 


1.8 


0.1 


300 


0.1 


1961 


10 


1.3 


0.1 


281 


0.1 


1962 


10 


1.5 


0.1 


267 


0.1 


1963 


9 


1.3 


0.1 


196 


0.1 


BY LOCAL UNIT, 1962-63 


Dorchester 


6 


28.6 


4.8 


133 


3.8 




1 


5.9 


0.9 


23 


0.8 






6.7 


1.0 


20 


0.8 


Talbot 


1 


8.3 


1.1 


20 


0.8 



* Schools having a one-teacher organization of grades one to five or more, 
t Data unavailable. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



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178 



Ninety- Seventh Annual Report 



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179 



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legs 



180 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 53 — Number of Public Schools: Number of Teachers and Principals: State of 
Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1963 



Number of 






-a 


G 


























>> 


rge's 










c 






Teachers 

AND 


hooh 


G 


Aruii 


O 


altimore 




a 








ester 


_o 




-a 


-o 




;omei 


Geo 


Ann 


iry's 






o 


8 




Principals 


11 Sc 


Uega 


nne . 


altin 


alvei 


aroli 


arrol 


ecil 


hark 


orch 


redei 


arret 


arfoi 


ovvar 


c 


c 
o 


■ince 


H 

a> 

D 




1 


ilbot 


ashil 


a 

o 
o 


orce! 




< 


< 


< 


pq 




O 




u 


O 


O 


Q 




O 


K 


W 


W 





















ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (1-6) 



839 29 61 

11 
22 
33 



85 14 9 18 19 12 21 26 17 21 15 11 100 113 10 



15 12 36 20 13 



JUNIOR, JUNIOR-SENIOR, SENIOR, AND VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS (7-12) 



All Schools 


285 

4 
4 
5 
7 
6 
6 
7 
4 
8 
5 
14 
13 
14 
15 
28 
19 
10 
16 
16 
10 
14 
6 

10 
9 
6 
6 
3 

20 


9 


14 


50 


29 


4 


8 


11 


7 


8 


7 
2 


9 


4 

1 

1 


8 


7 


4 


30 


34 


4 


6 


7 
1 


3 


12 


6 


4 


1.0- 2.9 


3.0- 4.9 






1 
1 
1 




i 


1 
1 
1 

2 


i 
1 
1 
1 


i 


1 

2 
























5.0- 6.9 


























7.0- 8.9 






















2 




1 






9.0-10.9 


1 










1 












11.0-12.9 


1 
2 




2 
1 
1 

3 




1 


















1 










13.0-14.9 








1 






1 


2 


















15.0-16.9 














1 














1 


1 
1 




17.0-18.9 








1 










1 










1 


1 






19.0-20.9 




1 


1 
















1 




1 

i 
1 


1 

i 




21.0-22.9 


*i 

2 
1 


1 


2 
2 




2 

i 

i 
1 
1 


i 

2 

3 


1 








1 


i 
1 
1 
1 
1 


1 




1 
1 
1 


3 
1 
1 


1 
3 
1 
2 


i 


1 
1 


23.0-24.9 






1 








25.0-29.9 


i 

2 


1 


2 






i 


i 

2 
1 
1 

3 
5 
3 
4 
3 


1 
1 
7 
7 
4 
6 
1 
1 
1 


30.0-34.9 


2 


4 
2 
2 




2 


1 


35.0-39.9 


2 


4 


1 


2 
2 










40.0-44.9 


1 
1 
1 
4 
4 
3 
2 
4 
3 
1 












1 






45.0-49.9 


















1 


2 

1 




50.0-54.9 




1 
2 
1 
1 


2 
3 

i 










1 










55.0-59.9 
































60.0-64.9 














1 
1 




















65.0-69.9 
















2 














1 
1 






70.0-74.9 






















75.0-79.9 




3 
1 
1 
1 


2 

3 
2 
1 
14 
























1 

2 










80.0-84.9 
























1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
















85.0-89.9 






































90.0-94.9 
























1 
















95.0-99.9 


1 
4 






































100.0 and over 
























1 























































Maryland State Department of Education 



181 



TABLE 54 — Number of Public Schools: Average Number Belonging: State of Maryland: 

Year Ending June 30, 1963 































'<o 




o 


























>> 

a! 


O 




V 

o 


o 










to 


<u 


.y 










s 

o 


o 


a 
<5 


altim 


altim 


alver 


arolii 


arroll 


ecil 


harle 


orch( 


reder 


arret 


arfor 


CS 

s: 
o 


ent 


[ontg 


rince 


c 

o 




m 


O 




O 


o 


O 


Q 




O 










Ph 





Average 
Number 
Belonging 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (1-8) 



All Schools 


839 

15 

23 
38 
23 
30 
31 
25 
35 
30 
36 
41 
35 
35 
39 
45 
27 
35 
33 
26 
24 
43 
33 
31 
30 
27 
15 
7 

15 
5 
2 
5 


29 
1 
2 

3 

2 
6 
2 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 

2 
1 

i 
i 


61 


146 


85 


14 


9 


18 


19 


12 


21 

5 
2 

6 

1 
1 

"i 
1 


26 

'i 

3 
2 

'3 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 

'2 

3 
1 


17 

2 
2 
1 
2 
3 
2 

i 

1 

i 
1 
1 


21 

'i 
"i 


15 
1 

'3 


11 

'3 
3 
1 


100 

i 

"i 
1 
1 
5 
4 
2 
7 
9 
7 
7 

6 
7 
4 
9 
3 
3 
5 
6 
5 
2 
4 


113 

2 

'3 

'4 
1 

3 
7 
2 
9 
8 
2 
7 
7 
9 
6 
6 
6 
7 
4 
8 
7 
3 
1 
1 


10 

i 
1 

'2 

2 
'2 


16 
'2 

i 
2 
2 

i 
2 
2 

i 
1 
1 
1 


15 

1 
2 
2 
\ 

2 
1 
1 
1 

"2 

i 


12 
1 

"i 

'3 
2 
1 

i 
i 

*i 
1 


36 

'i 

3 
3 
4 
3 
1 
2 


20 

'3 

3 

i 

2 
1 


13 

2 
1 

'3 


30 or less 


31- 60 


1 
1 

2 
3 
3 
1 
2 
4 
4 
1 
1 
1 
3 
3 
3 
3 
4 
1 
2 
3 
4 
3 
3 
1 
2 

i 
1 


4 
2 

i 
1 
1 
1 

2 
1 
5 
7 
6 
2 
4 
2 
9 
5 
4 
5 

14 
8 
8 

13 

12 
7 
3 

11 
2 
2 
4 


2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
4 

'4 
2 
1 
4 
2 
1 
1 
5 
4 
4 
5 
7 
9 
9 
6 
5 
2 
2 
1 


2 
1 










61- 90 




1 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 

i 

2 
1 
1 


'2 
1 
1 

i 
2 

i 

i 


91- 120 


121- 150 


'3 

'3 
1 
1 
1 
1 


1 
1 
2 
1 

i 


"1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 


151- 180 


'2 




1 


181- 210 


211- 240 


241- 270 


i 
1 


1 
2 




271- 300 


301- 330 


4 

'3 
2 
2 

2 
1 

1 
1 


1 
1 

'2 

i 
1 
1 


'i 

'2 

'2 
1 


331- 360 


361- 390 


'2 
2 
1 
2 


2 
1 

i 


i 


391- 420 


1 


i 
1 


2 
1 


421- 450 


451- 480 


481- 510 


1 


2 
1 

i 






511- 540 


















541- 570 




1 


1 
1 


i 


1 








1 

i 
1 


1 










571- 600 


1 

3 




2 
1 










601- 660 










661- 720 
















721- 780 


















2 












1 




781- 840 






1 




1 


















841- 900 


1 






1 




















901- 960 






















1 




961-1020 










1 








1 
1 




















1021-1080 






































1081-1140 






















1 


















1141-1200 








































1201 and over 


1 




















































































JUNIOR, JUNIOR-SENIOR. SENIOR, AND VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS (7-12) 


All Schools 


285 

2 
10 
9 
9 
11 
5 
7 
7 

13 
7 
19 
15 
20 
19 
13 
14 
13 
16 
9 
6 
8 
5 
5 
9 
4 
4 
7 
4 
3 
4 
8 


9 


14 


50 


29 


4 


8 


11 


7 


8 


7 

1 
1 


9 


4 


8 


7 


4 


30 


34 


4 


6 


7 


3 


12 


6 


4 


50 or less 


51- 100 


3 


i 


2 
1 
1 
3 
2 
1 
1 
3 




i 


2 
2 


1 
1 
1 
1 


i 


2 
1 
1 




2 
























101- 150 








1 








2 




"i 


1 




151- 200 


1 








1 










201- 250 


1 






2 










1 




251- 300 


















1 














2 




301- 350 




i 


1 


1 






1 






1 










1 

'2 
1 
2 


1 


i 


1 


351- 400 




1 


i 




2 

i 
1 


401- 450 




2 

i 












1 


1 






2 


451- 500 






1 

i 


'2 
1 
1 
2 


1 

'2 

i 








1 






501- 600 


1 
2 

i 








1 
1 


1 

"i 
1 


2 
2 
2 






i 


'2 
1 

4 

2 

6 

2 
3 


1 
4 
4 
5 
4 
6 

2 


5 


1 




601- 700 


'i 
1 
1 

2 
1 


2 
4 
1 

i 

2 
3 
1 




701- 800 




i 
1 


1 
1 










2 




1 
1 


801- 900 


2 
1 
1 
4 
2 
4 
2 
2 
1 
2 
3 






2 










901-1000 








1 






1001-1100 






1 






















1101-1200 






















1 




1201-1300 
























1301-1400 














1 




















1401-1500 






















1 
















1501-1600 


i 


1 
2 
1 
1 
1 

i 


1 

i 














1 




2 




















1601-1700 














1 
1 

1 
















1701-1800 
























1 

2 
2 
















1801-1900 
































1 






1901-2000 


















.. 














2001-2100 


1 

4 
2 
2 
3 
7 


1 
1 
2 
1 






































2101-2200 




































2201-2300 










































2301-2400 










































2401-2500 


























1 










































1 



























































182 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 




Maryland State Department of Education 



183 



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184 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



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laot^ coococoui cot-^coco-^ 



CO OC 05 C 

CO »o c 



CO lO 



• t-- <-< CO O CO »o ( 



OO CO CO lO 

-rf CO CO CO 

■rt< CO 05 C2 



1—1 O "3 O 05 CO 05 lO CO 00 OO 05 CO lO ■ 
!>.OCOlOCO OOCO^COi— 1 ^t-COOOUS — lO-'*'! 
•-■COCOCO^ -tf^lOCO^ -"flO^^-H r-i-^CO' 



'C0O5l>-O5 COlO'-ir^O ICCOCOOO O "5 OS co 



) ^ TJ< OO 05 
) OO h~ O CO 
I CO CO 03 



CO T-( 05 CO CO — < — I OO Oa CO CO 05 CO 
COt^t^f CO ■— " '— 1 »C — I CO CO 

»-( ^ CC CO 



2: 2: 

a j3 O O ^. 



.S2 -*^''^-g 

<U O) O c« ^ 

2i S o S 



2 d >r; 



fern ^ 



CO eo CO •«*< i-i t^cocoi-!.-! 



CO CO OO O CO 



-co 



a a s 



^ •< <j P5 pq p:^ 



<u o ! o 

g.a a § s 



Maryland State Department of Education 



185 



iil 



Less Than 
2 Years 
College 


Per 
Cent 


cc »-i • • CO ■— 1 • • • • ■ • e>i CO -00 • -coo • 
^ c>oe^^ o o o o oo 


Num- 
ber 


CO coco- - •• .... ... 


2-3 Years 
College 


Per 
Cent 


0» »0»OCO<M - • (M oo ,-1 NCfllOOOO »0 ^ (M i-H M 00 O O 
CO COCOOSCfl irr CO tN Id ,-c r-n-H C<1 Tji O <M C<) r-i rtTf<r-lt>. 


Num- 
ber 


»0 ^ <M CO ■ -(MCD-^^tCO •'Ti^lOmcO O5U5,-ic0^ »-iO0C<>00 
05 »-icO0O-^ • CO 


Bachelor's 
Degree 


Per 
Cent 


U5 «0«000e0 t»«OOOt^ OOC^ITfOOOO us-^ocot^ OlOt^CO 
W5 t^o6«50<— ' eO'^OOcScO b-^C005i-HCO 00 to CO O U5 CO »0 CO 

CO CO cxD oot^t^ooi>. 1~- co ict^ocoooo cocot-^t-- 


Num- 
ber 


8,342 

233 
682 
1,388 
1,454 
61 

91 
172 
145 
116 

87 

252 
63 
274 
130 
62 

1,063 
1,262 

74 
102 

78 

57 
253 
156 

87 


Master's 
Degree and 
Equivalent* 


Per 
Cent 


29.5 

29. 1 
18.4 
42.4 
25.3 
18.7 

13.3 
19.0 
17.7 
17.2 
21.2 

20.4 
25.6 
19.1 
25.4 
12.2 

40.8 
21.2 
12.8 
16.5 
13.2 

30.9 
28.0 
22.8 
16.7 


Num- 
ber 


i-irtOiOf •^■^co>c>« copqcococs t-io^^^c^ cocot--05 
CO ocooorti-i .-i-^coeacsi cocjco-^ -^io^csii-h c<i o <-' 

CO T-^ 



C9 OT O) 
CO>H ■© 



P3 



1^^ 



S ^ 



1^ 



t^cot^oo -r^icc^oo 

o o CO T-; ^ 



(M ^ (M "5 



O '-H -t^r* CO 05 

,_; C^J CO r-^ O O 



C<1 O 00 <M --I 



t->-H 00 02 



05 lO r-H c; »o 



) oo CO 

'tom^co m <m c<i 



»C oo (M O "5 ( 

coocoiooo lei-^i 



CO (M CO 



00 »-i 05 (M 



C« CO CO O: O CO t-- CO IM (M N 00 

■^cooiood oo-^oio ■^'oOkOci'^ 
t— r— *o CO CO CO CO ^ CO 



)co(mu5(m co o 05 
I-^im'cjoo o>oocc> 



CO >« C2 -rl" ^ 



1 IM CS COOO 



<M CO t— »rj clOcOCO 
t^lOWt^l^ lO CO t— 00 
CO CSI (M T-1 



OOOCOOO COOO-<fOO<M eOlM^OOO 00 lO ^ 

ci >ft CO 05 CO ci CO t>l CO cdocfi5o>t>^ r^odc^ii-Hci 



IO00C4 00 

05 o 00 



»0 CO ^ o ■ 



eSIUSlOOOt^ <MO><Mt-.iO 



00 OS 00 CO 



CO U5 CO CO 

e<i o lo CO ca o 



' OC CO 05 

' <ri <3 o 



1 CO ^ «5 
I O ^ c^i 



t^<M - CO 00t^>O-<ti 
Cr-^ 'coo ^OOO 



Or-iCOiftUS >-it>.COOOO 1-1 a> Oi y~i Oi O0eot-»05U5 t^CDeOi-^ 

oscocDojoi coososoit-^ •^o-<j?-<s!io e<io6(M'r4Tr eooicoco 



COt^lOOt^ COO5»C00i— CO OS O O CO »flO5-HC^00 COOt^OS 

»005OOt— 1 oot^c^-^ 05,— loioe-i ot^c^ico c^oc^ci 

<M O CO ,-1 ^ CSl ^ 



ikOOO'f ^t^(MCDlO COlft-^r-OS CO '-i OS CO 

' O (H U5 »C «« C5 >-< CO CO CO 

. . CO CO 



- J U? CD C^l O I 
I CO 03 oo ^ N CSI rH •»tl,-l»0< 



M 00 CD CO I CO O CO OS ■»»" 00 IC 00 CO C<> O 05 CO O CO CO CO 05 



Tjt CM ^ >^ ^ ^ 



I •O'*' CO CO oocoooco. 



) 0) O) 



cs-i^l Isslg |-si2i 

OOOOQ feUMa« SdiO^MOT 



2d-; 



B to 

o « 
-H o 



CO CO T-l 



' o c .a 
; e e s 

i '.s '-S -a 



•t^ o o> u 



186 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



o <u 



.M a' 

If 



1-^ 



^6 



a h 



1^ 



Than 

ears 

ege 


Per 
Cent 




x\ um- 
ber 


2--3 Years 
College 


Per 
Cent 


Num- 
ber 


Bachelor's 
Degree 


Per 
Cent 


Num- 
ber 


ter's 

e and 
alent* 


Per 
Cent 


Mas 
Degre 
Equiv 


Num- 
ber 



oi T—i c<i oo ■ ■ -m • • CO • ■ ■ - 00 o ■ • • 

^ c<i ^ 00 >-< ci c6 o o <r4 <ri 

cc .... .... 

Tfl,-lOO(MCO -OCOt^O CO • • CO »0 O CJO O • C<l CO 

CO •^•^coc<irr icoci-^ ro loo oc<i'^»o co»o-<i^'-<a5 

fO (M^CflC^i-i -^OCCrC— . C<) • -(MC^) -HC5r-lcvq . ^ 

O CO ^ ■ 

t^OiCOCOCO O O t>. >-l O CO o o Mco-^om o co oo 

O CO CO t-^ 'rr -4 »0 t--^ O l-^ 1^ CO .-I O 1--^ CO O C3 CO lO CO >-i 

00 OOOOt^OOOS Cr>00t--00 00 OOOOOOOOO COOOC:OOI>. t- OO 00 30 

CO 02 CO <M C5t^^t--..-H OO CO TJ< CO t^-'tlCSCCICO (MOOOOO 

CD COC^COCO(M »-l C<1 <M r-C 00 r-l O t>- 1-H CO »-< — < TI< r-< 

»-i CO C<) CO 

_c£ 

t~- ci i>- o »o M o »o CO o CO •"S' o • "O t>. 05 CO 

^ ^S^^''' »Ot^»OCO^ »«C005COlO 

OO CO C5 00 ^ 1— 1 'tl 1— I CO CO M 00 05 ^ coco • lO CO »C lO CO 

C2 M CO -^co- 
co i-H 

C5 .»-<,-icoi>. -CO^CO • 00 • • i-l ■ • .-c -co • • >-l • • 

CO (M't^o<icd oooolO CO CO 

ii> -ooco-^M • CO c<« • eo • -co • -co • • • 

0- COCO—l • • 

o -lot^-^o -^cooio coco-^cocfl co>oa>05o oococot^ 

N 'm?c5coo '— ;c<i^-4' c5o6iooc5o6 ot^»ococ5 i-l-^coco 

c^,-,^^ '-■r-KM CI (M ,-1 .-.(M (M^rt 

00 • -H — ( CO •-*icOOO.-i COi-nO-^fM >-lO^CO(M lO --I 

■ 05 ^ 

CO 

CO OCOT)<t^O OCOCOt^O CO <M CO 00 C^t^^^O Oi» .-c t~- CO 

CO dccttidd OTi^rsIcoio o6--Jo6>rf^ •<i' t)3 oi o oioicoco 

O"5COt~-00 Olr^COt^O CO C5 00 CO 00 ooooost^oo t>.t>.t^oo 

01 CO CO C> CO CO 00 — i-H (M (M Ol rt< CO CO 00 cooococo 

te> cooooMc^ ^(McocMCsi lO^ooco c<im^<n -^coeoi-" 

O T-l CO Tf CO 



OS -OOOOCOCO •t>.CO • • eo • . . »0 -t^ • -(MOt^ 

CO -^t-^-^co iO<M' t>^o t^co-r •^t'^cd 

»C • lO CO CO ^ • C>) CO • • CO -co • • C5 CO • !M ■ ■ CM CO i-H 

00 -i-iCOlM • • • ... coco • 

CO CO >-i ^ <M • CO a> • . -Oi • -^o>co-<a< • -Oi-i • 

c4 t-Jt^uic<ico co»cc^ CO i^j ooc4<M r-ir-i 

M T-4--00-rt<e^ -COCOIM • O • -CO • i-l05i-IC^ • •■-H^ • 

t}H^(M . .... ... 

(M COi-i<Mt>.-^ -OSIMOC^ »Ct^t^-<J<CO <MOeOCO-^ CO 05 

00 (M'«cot--^t^ 't^^»o-<s< cocooiifsco OU5>005t--^ t~^oioi»0 

1- c (M 00 CO CO -t^M-KM OOi-nOcO-^ (M 05 00 CO O OS CO 

00 (M OO ^—1 ^ ^ T^i 

Tfi CO(MCOi-lC^ "^OlMt^-^ OS CO r-l Tt< COOi-HflOO lOr^lMOO 

OO csio-HC<i>o t^ci d ai cooooscoco ••a'-^CQOsi^ cocioco 

OS 00 OO O500COt>.00 t^OOOOt-00 i>.ooost^t^ t^oooooo 

CO e<I00t^I^CO 00CO'*llOC5 C^lfCOCOlO »^t^lOCO^ tOcDCO-H 

CO t^OCOOO-*' COt^t^lO'J' O 05 CO Cq C«C<ICOCOC<1 d OO t--. CO 

e<i ■^cDoo T-< cooo 

00 oocoi-cot^ cot^o>0'!f t^-a^t^coco ^ -looo oot^oooo 

o coi>^oo6eo cico^i-ico cot>^t^o6co ^2 *^ ^ odedooo 

CO CO t--. CI ^ o »o ^ CO cs OS ^ c<i os •t^'*' cot^oo-^ 

00 OS 00 i~i T-t ^ OS • 

la oi 



^ _ 



oj 6 



Si-3^g "Sfci^e 
■^<;fqmo ooooQ c=,OKWW 



o.s § . a 



a a 1-1 M 



Maryland State Department of Education 



187 



1—4 



e<i — <M 00 



t-- oc »c 



•"S' ^ OC <N <M -tOt^t^O «0 • • CO lO MOOOO 

Tj; CD >r5005-^ ci coo Oci-lTiO 



CO -n- c-^ CO 



CO M ^(M < 



• CO CC CC C<1 



CO OS to CO CO ooe^»-<o cot^ooc 



OO OC TJ- O t-- CO 00 



O CO CSI CO c 
CO CO 



eoeco5C<ico c^oooc 



^5 



05 r>- o •f "s o us co o co oo m •«ot^ r-os-^co 
CO o c<i --j •«»< iot>^c4coc^ i(5coo6eo»« °° 



II 



CO <M t>. 03 . 



c$ n o) 
>-3 



• '-'^cor- -oo-Hco • oo • 
<>j <H CO o6 00 ro CD 



iCO-^<M -CO-^M • CO • -to • 



!5 » 



s «- 



• OC CO O "5 CO CO TP CO CO »0 C5 CO O 00COt^t>- 

^ (Nl TP O 00 »C 00 00 Ct^iti-^O t-^'^tOtO 



I O CD <M 1 



CO ooocot>.o 0»OCOt^lO COt^<MCO< 



U5C<I^050 CO ^ CO CO 



TP CO CO Tf 00 CO 00 CO CO 
C»U5«CO ^COCO'— 



•2 §g 



• U5 CO CO CO 
TP CO 



CO CO ■ . 



2 te 



CO T-1 C<l C<1 

•-i »o ci CO 



1 I— 00 TP CO 



Oi CD 
O O CO 



1^1 



II 



1^^ 



CO COCOCOl^TP • O ""^i 05 C<l iOt^OOTfcO CO O CO 00 t^COOTf 

00 co»ocot^r>^ ooi-Iiot)! cococoioco oicuicst^ t^cioo 



— COOOCOCOTf -t^CO^CO 00>-«lCCD 



CO C2 CO 00 CO coooaco 



CD COCOCOOCO TPOOlOl^TP 



CO < 



00 T}< O ^ CDOOtPIC- 
COt>^Oo6cO CO CO CO < 



< C: C ^ Tji cocDi-hO< 



»o i-H 00 



> CD U5 O CO IC CD ^ »0 CD CO <-< 
^ CO CD C>) CO 00 t--. CO 



. CO CD CO 

> t-^ 00 CO 



us CO CO CO CO 



3 O 0) 
C n c« 

<«CQO 



I coTO OS eo coo ' 



CO lO 00 00 00 

t>; 00 CO c> 



• CO CO CO t-- TP 



5 2^ = v« 



•-as « 

Jill 



— . — CO < 



S E « 



188 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Eeport 



J§ o to C 



^ u to T3 C . 





S 


to 
Z3 


Non- 
degree 




Certific; 


gree Stai 


Bache- 

lor S{ 




' Type of 


It by De 


Mas- 
ter's 

above 


Total 


ipals bj 


BUOISIAO 


Per 

Cent 




Princ 
















achers a 


sional 


Per 

Cent 




<u 


Profesi 


Num- 
ber 



11 



! en 5 



»f5 O «0 ^ Ci 



o oo 



(M t>. ICI . 



00 «o »0 Cd ' 



C<1 OJ CO O 00 c 



1 CO (M OJ . 



• CO .-H lO <M S<1 



C5 00 t-- 1— I CO «o oo o < 



CO o >o ' 
CO OO ^ Ir^ ' 

r-( »C 



(M CO t-- o <M oo CO CO (^J T-H CO CO o CO C5 
CO CO CO iOoicooi-^ -a- -h ^ lo (m --i 
CO CO 



I-— "t--OCO C<l<MOiCOt^ COOO"— CC005 >— iC^COOt^ 



O ^ o < 
— ■ ^ ^ « 

CO e<r 



■COCOO CT> O CO O 00 ^ 00 00 t^ot--o 

^ 0> «f5 CO -^oilOOSt^. ^COOJCOOS OO 05 (M 
05t- y-t CO<N-H 



lO -rf ' 
CO 00 ' 
CO CO 



) CO .-H ■ 



I .-I CO C<l CO »-i '5' COCOCOCOt^ ^-^COt^^ lOOCOC 

i050or- — - — .. 

^ CO 



^ .-HOlOOC^ 1-1 Ttl T-< CO >« < 



, (M _ ^ CO ^ 



t— a>'<*ioco >o 00 OS cflot^cooo oocoosioco »oooc<«eo 

'. CO CO • 



'CS>CO'^(M C0-*i<M>O(M 



coooot^c 



I CD O Tfi ifS i-H lO CO 



OOOCO-»*iC<l <M "5 t- 

)»0(>jco coc^icDcood _ ^ 
. CO uo t-- co>ot^-^t~-. cor>.oo 



lO IM 00 



CO ^ »0 O O lO 



iir^ooio iMcoioooo 00 CO I 

I --H CO CO 05 O 0> CO ! 

1-c ^ (M <M <M C3 



Oi 00 00 
>o O O OJ 
CO(M 



'CO ' 
CO O CO ^ 
TcOCN 



eo o CD e<> cot^ooc^" 
coot^oooo e<iO500coc5 
CO ^ CO ^ o r-- 



05 0> CO "-I 



<M GTS CO OS ■ 



I CO 00 o 



CO CO < 



Ot^i-HCO 00rtt^>O. 



CO OS IM OS 



W CO 1-1 »-i 



CO CO ■ 



>— c CO CO 



(M 3S 00 «5 ■ 



(M CIS CO CO 



-rf<coot>.-H OS OS ^ osb-^ocsj ooocoiocN T-iasi-Ht~-. 

ost^--e^r-^ cicoduit-^ d-^cii-ic^ t>^co"5^(^ ost~-^c^c6 

CO IM (M C<l 1-1 CO (M C<l --I CO(M<MCO(M C<l CO ^ i-l (M ^ .-i ^ 

(M OS OS (M OS »0 l^t^<Mt^»« b- 00 00 O CO CO O U5 O 

CO CO »f5 »0 M OO CSl 00 1— I ■<3< CO 1— I CO 00 QO C<l — 1 CO »iS «o 

b- CO OS rtrt <M r-1 r-1 >-l i— 

CD-^OCOOS OS 00 CO .-<COOSOOO -^(M-^»O00 OS .-l OS CO 

o OS c<i i-! o c<i OS kC5 i>l OS i>I c^co-^ooci c5c^i>^co 

OSCOt^t^t^ OOCOt-t^OO COt>.t-COt^ t^COOOiOOO t>.00QO00 

OO <— I O OS O (M OS OS CO CO 1—1 O CO »Oi-ii— llOOS OS -Tf OS OS 

OS (M C<l CO OO OS OS O OO Tfi l>. CD CO >0 >0 (M ^ OS OS 

lOtMi-iCOr^ -KMCMIMtM ^r^lOtMi-i OOCO^i-ii-i ^CDCO-H 

i-T to CO C<I 

1—1 OS OS OS C-5 05 00 OS CO 1— I »0 00 CO »C OS O <M CO OS 

CD >0 1— 1 OS O 00 ^ CO IC O OS CO »0 CO CO t- OS 00 00 >0 CO 

CO OS CO 1-1 IM 1*1 CO (M t^i-it^CO^ OS »0 1-1 C« 1-1 ^ 

i-< CD TJ<" CO CO 



§ a a 



cs :e ai 



o) a> o oi 



Si-" 

a3 O £3 03 



CO raCcSdSoS o3:e<P-CO iS'^S-tJo 

<j<l?qcqo ooooQ faOWMW 



■-ass 
?-s a s 



Maryland State Department of Education 



189 





2 o) 


sional 


Per 
Cent 


M 
O 




Pr^ 





00 SOO'TO-^ C50000 
,-i-q<<Mt^^ -Ti (M C<5 



O • -r -rr ^3 



00 »0 «0 e<3 



COWOOCOt^ lO <M 1 



lO (M 00 05 Cfl 



. lO <-< Tj< ,-1 e<5 o < 



.O^COfJ< 05 >0 "5 t^OOMt^lM 

I 00 ^ t-- 1 - 

lo 



• •-" •-' »0 CO CO . 



O cotr^ 00 . 

CO co- 
co CO 



t^»O(Mt^C0 U5CO00O5CO »C00t^r-H00 

C5'^c^»ot^ <m'o6o>oco 

— - -- —)t^ 05 00 00 



C0««O!0S5 t-ococ^ 



CO CO >o 



« —1 CO »^ 



t- »0 r-l CO »« »O^«O««00 •^COl«-HT»< 
■^'t^-^lCt^ OCOOO'^-H (MOO-^OOt^ 
COOOOO T-l C<1 ^ T-i --l CO CO 



-H»ooo<Ma> oot^o^ 

00 «0 r-1 CO C<> ^ 



»o to CO o " 

T-H CO CO 00 • 

CO "Ti CO 



CJ 

C3 O 

pa-" 



15 §-1 



O 1_ 

e« o 



^1" 



^rt^OO OiO«OOOC<l 003»0>OCO 

>-< 00 CO a> (M — I csi ioeo 

— 1 CO 



I CO <M CO 00 



^ .-r , 



ICOCOCOIM OOt^-^C<) 



)t^^OCO t^ClCOO 

■ o6-^cot~^ ^coim'oo 



> CO t- O CO CO 00 
I CO 35 
»0 OO CO 



CO 00 CO c 



00 CO O IM lO »0 CO t 



CO »-( 00 <M iO<MC^00<M ^ ^ _ to — 



CO a> OS (M (M'^'^t^oo oococooo -*! CO C5 o Tti eo-Ht^u3 
o-ti'cico**} >«coo6coco co»o-^c5-h" c^^uir^oi o6c6t>^^' 

OSft^COtO 00Tji»Ot^t>. >OI>.CO«Ot^ COUSb-TfOO lOt^OOOO 



iOt~ "SMOOCOtO CO CO O 00 —c COOOWO 05 'J* s 



c:3 o ' 
CO ci 



CO CO - 



•«r-^iooooo CO 

Ci 0C-Ht-.»O— < 



00 o >o — < 



' COC35 CO 00 



•<J"t^00CO00 «0 CO o . 

O o6c>Q I 

CO — I ■ 



»-< »f5 CO 00 CO O -VI 
t>- lO — < lO CO >o O I 



CO O O CO c<« 



00 (M O O CO 



"5 CO O CO 



eo »-< -H 



CO O U9 05 

CO 



I t*<M »0 0> (M M Oi 



^ 00 c<i 



^1 



^2 



I 05 00 05 CO IM CO 05 



CO CO <M IM CO 
CO ^ 
iC IM ^ 



_ eo CO lO 

t^COCO-^lO "^Ot—OO 
CO CO ^ 



O CT> iM O 

t^tor- 

cm" 



5 1 J 



f (M CO CO 00 
Pfl t~ 05 t-" 

to 00 -H o -< 



CO OO IM o 



.3 o 



I Is 
2 



§ aj oj 
^ - o 



c4c9c9 jj3ja)-CO CoJcSOo ^"-3^3 oS 

35ao ;:;ioc:L^a fc,C!53a3« S^^cmcq £- 



0} 

o 
o 



-g " >.2 
as" ^ 



190 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 





ficate 


e Status 


Non- 
degree 




O 






o 




C« O 




by Typ( 


<U 

Q 


Mas- 
ter's 
and 
above 


High (7- 


incipals 


visions 


Per 
Cent 


s and Pr 




Num- 
ber 




a> 
-C 








Tea( 


i 


■Si 




New 


Profesi 


Num- 
ber 




Total 
New 
Teach- 
ers 

.ind 


Prin- 
cipals* 




ficate 


e Status 


►2 « 




Certi 


^."^ 

U (- 




by Type of 




c3 O 


(1-6) 


a> 

Q 

>i 


Mas- 
ter's 
and 
above 


NTART 


incipals 


BUOjSIAO 


Per 
Cent 


S 


s and Pr 




Num- 
ber 




a> 
M 








Tea( 


3U0IS 






New 


Profesi 


Num- 
Der 




Total 


Teach- 
ers 
and 
Prin- 
cipals* 




ficate 


m 
3 


Non- 
degree 




Certi 


je Stai 


J- 00 




o 




pa — 




by Type 


<u 
Q 

^ 
•1- 
-3 


Mas- 
ter's 
and 
above 


< 


m 


a 




Tot 


'dioui 


o 
'S 

o 






s and Pr 




Num- 
ber 




<u 
JS 




fen 




Too/ 

leac 


sionj 


^6 




New 


Profes! 


Num- 
Der 



c^oscsiM • ec — 1 



M oc 



IM <M N 



c «c 1-1 CI o tooot^c 



■ IC CO »« lO 



) o cc O lO cc ' 
o eo cc — — , 



• (M oc 



1 o o ec c<i 



• cc CO i-H »-( ^ CO 



00— lOOOOO iOt^t^— I 

oi CO CO c> couiccoo 
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204 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 77 — Number and Per Cent of Teachers and Principals Who Withdrew from 
Maryland Public Schools— By Organization: Summer, 1962 and School Year, 1962-63 



Local Unit 


Total 


Elementary (1-6) 


High (7-12) 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Total State 


*4, 196 


15. 


4 


2,281 


16 


3 


1,915 


14.4 


Allegany 


56 


8 


5 


24 


8 





32 


8.9 


Anne Arundel 


442 


22 


6 


238 


22 


6 


204 


22.5 




811 


12 


5 


454 


13 


6 


357 


11.4 




696 


16 


1 


376 


17 


1 


320 


15.1 




43 


22 


4 


21 


18 


6 


22 


27.8 


Caroline 


31 


14 


8 


17 


17 


5 


14 


12.5 


Carroll 


80 


16 


4 


26 


10 


8 


54 


21.9 


Cecil 


90 


21 


5 


41 


18 


6 


49 


24.6 




53 


15 


9 


27 


15 


3 


26 


16.7 


Dorchester 


33 


13 





14 


11 


3 


19 


14.6 


Frederick 


110 


15 


6 


63 


17 


3 


47 


13.8 




27 


14 


1 


13 


13 





14 


15.4 


Harford 


150 


20 


4 


76 


20 


2 


74 


20.6 


Howard 


79 


20 


9 


44 


23 


5 


35 


18.4 


Kent 


29 


18 


3 


11 


13 


4 


18 


23.7 


Montgomery 


615 


15 


6 


346 


17 


1 


269 


14.1 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


701 


19 


8 


420 


23 


4 


281 


16.2 


33 


18 


4 


15 


17 





18 


19.8 


St. Mary's 


71 


26 


3 


35 


26 


5 


36 


26.1 




23 


12 





8 


8 


.5 


15 


15.3 


Talbot 


35 


19 


1 


17 


17 


7 


18 


20.7 


Washington 


83 


10 


6 


43 


10 


9 


40 


10.3 




72 


15 


9 


39 


16 


5 


33 


15.2 




40 


16 


7 


16 


13 


.4 


24 


20.0 



* Transfers between imits are included in individual unit totals but excluded from State totals as follows: 
total, 207; elementary, 103; high, 104. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



205 



TABLE 78 — Number and Per Cent of Teachers and Principals Who Withdrew from 
Maryland Public Schools : Summer, 1962, and School Year, 1962-63 



Local Unit 


Total 


Summer, 1962 


School Year, 1962-63 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 




*4, 196 


15 


4 


3,027 




1 


1,169 


4 


3 


Allegany 


56 


8 


5 


42 


6 


4 


14 


2 


1 


Anne Arundel 


442 


22 


6 


338 


17 


3 


104 


5 


3 


Baltimore City 


811 


12 


5 


527 


8 


1 


284 


4 


4 




696 


16 


1 


484 


11 


2 


212 


4 


9 


Calvert 


43 


22 


4 


37 


19 


3 


6 


3 


1 


Caroline 


31 


14 


8 


24 


11 


5 


7 


3 


3 


Carroll 


80 


16 


4 


64 


13 


1 


16 


3 


3 


Cecil 


90 


21 


5 


73 


17 


4 


17 


4 


1 




53 


15 


9 


42 


12 


6 


11 


3 


3 




33 


13 





28 


11 





5 


2 







110 


15 


6 


83 


11 


8 


27 


3 


8 




27 


14 


1 


26 


13 


6 


1 





5 




150 


20 


4 


127 


17 


3 


23 


3 


1 




79 


20 


9 


64 


17 





15 


3 


9 


Kent 


29 


18 


3 


24 


15 


2 


5 


3 




Montgomery 


615 


15 


6 


466 


11 


8 


149 


3 


8 




701 


19 


8 


495 


14 





206 


5 


8 


33 


18 


4 


28 


15 


6 


5 


2 


8 


St. Mary's 


71 


26 


3 


56 


20 


7 


15 


5 


6 


Somerset 


23 


12 





19 


9 


9 


4 


2 


1 


Talbot 


35 


19 


1 


25 


13 


7 


10 


5 


4 




83 


10 


6 


66 


8 


4 


17 


2 


2 




72 


15 


9 


59 


13 





13 


2 


9 


Worcester 


40 


16 


7 


32 


13 


4 


8 


3 


3 



* Transfers between vmits are included in individual unit totals but excluded from State total as follows: 
total, 207; summer, 202; school year, 5. 



206 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



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208 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 81— State Aid for Minimum Program* : Maryland Public Day Schools- 
Grades 1-12: Year Ending June 30, 1963 



T.nPAT TTtsitt 


Cost of Minimum Program 


State Aid for 
Minimum Program 


Totalt 


Minimum 
Salaries 


Other 
Current 
Expense 
Cost 


Trans- 
portation 


Amountt 


Per Cent 


Total State 


$163,265, 175 


$121, 424, 821 


$30, 356, 206 


$11, 382, 487 


$79, 339, 380 


48 


.6 




4,683,356 


3,411, 169 


852, 792 


410,203 


3,028, 568 


64 


7 


Anne Arundel . . . 


11,637,906 


8,466,857 


2, 116, 713 


1,053,632 


7,042,791 


60 


.5 




37,938,306 


30,212, 590 


7, 553, 148 


172,568 


14,465,618 


38 


.1 


Baltimore 


23, 558,291 


17, 587,222 


4,396,806 


1, 573,401 


7,632,450 


32 


.4 


Calvert 


1,446,631 


920, 089 


230,023 


296,398 


1,155,118 


79 


.8 


Caroline 


1, 523, 768 


1,018, 175 


254, 544 


248,665 


1, 183, 116 


77 


.6 


Carroll 


3,249,486 


2,263,873 


565,970 


415, 108 


1,861,254 


57 


.3 


Cecil 


2, 888,263 


2,036,062 


509,015 


343, 186 


1,925,461 


66 


.7 


Charles 


2,431,312 


1,651,979 


412,995 


365,297 


1,809,311 


74 


.4 


Dorchester 


1,916,233 


1,280,370 


320, 092 


315,771 


1,255,301 


65 


.5 




4,244, 187 


3,025,845 


756,461 


461,373 


2,322, 512 


54 


.7 




1,625, 523 


1,000,301 


250,076 


365,062 


1,253, 521 


77 


.1 


Harford 


5,066,967 


3,410,974 


852,743 


802, 568 


3,149,980 


62 


.2 


Howard 


2, 535,393 


1,751, 130 


437, 782 


345, 980 


1,273, 189 


50 


.2 


Kent 


1,063, 588 


722,883 


180,720 


156, 583 


644,275 


60 


.6 


Montgomery. . . . 


21,510,677 


16,373,893 


4,093,473 


1,033, 581 


8,473, 149 


39 


.4 


Prince George's. 


19,768,081 


15, 071, 579 


3.767,895 


925,297 


10,883,067 


55 


.1 


Queen Anne's. . . 


1,254,647 


822, 797 


205,699 


224,670 


810,245 


64 


.6 


St. Mary's 


1,797,805 


1,200,694 


300, 174 


295, 024 


1,301,891 


72 


.4 


Somerset 


1,421,599 


960,737 


240, 184 


220, 572 


1, 171,321 


82 


.4 


Talbot 


1,279,348 


882, 545 


220, 637 


176,070 


674, 192 


52 


.7 


Washington 


5, 537, 562 


4,049,419 


1,012,355 


475, 524 


3,226, 119 


58 


.3 


Wicomico 


3, 157,407 


2,168,019 


542,003 


399,659 


1,888,239 


59 


.8 


Worcester 


1,728,839 


1, 135,619 


283,906 


306,295 


908,692 


52 


.6 



* The minimum program in calculating State Equalization aid includes the following: 

(a) total minimum salaries of the allowed number of teachers and principals as determined by State law; 

(b) other current expense including the cost of operation and maintenance and the cost of instruction 

other than the salaries of teachers, principals, and supervisors; and 

(c) the cost of approved transportation to public schools. 

t Tution applicable to Bylaw 11 included in these columns only. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



209 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



219 



TABLE 90 — Average Annual Salary per Teacher and Principal: 
Public Schools of Maryland : 1923-1963 



Year Ending 
June 30 


Average Annual Salary per Teacher and Principal 


Total 


Elementary 


High 


1923 


$1,243 


$1, 156 


$1,671 


1928 


1,408 


1,320 


1,830 


1933 


1.453 


1,398 


1,659 


1938 


1,556 


1,487 


1,784 


1943 


1,775 


1,648 


1,994 


1954 


4, 093 


4,020 


4, 186 


1955 


4,163 


4, 104 


4,237 


1956 


4,465 


4,450 


4,482 


1957 


4, 719 


4,684 


4,760 


1958 


4, 944 


4, 821 


5,092 


1959 


5,247 


5,079 


5,447 


1960 


5, 493 


5,436 


5, 556 


1961 


5,852 


5,715 


5,999 


1962 


6, 009 


6,019 


6, 184 


1963 


6,239 


6, 147 


6,334 



220 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



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$10, 7t)0 

8, 800 
11,477 
12,007 
12,008 
10, 450 

8,500 
10,013 
0,090 
8, 003 
7,914 

10, 129 
7,033 
9,925 

10, 339 

8, 525 

12, 859 
11,259 
8,484 

9, 858 
7, 100 

8,700 
9, 258 
8,992 
8, 150 


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Elementary 


$5, 952 

5, 413 
5,216 
5, 984 
5, 650 
5, 214 

5,210 
5, 145 
5, 704 
5, 859 
5, 481 

5, 413 
5, 398 
5,838 
5, 081 
5,317 

7, 129 
0,291 
5, 506 

4, 961 
5,090 

5, 281 
5, 835 
5, 583 
5, 140 




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1 


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Local Unit 


Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Haltimore City. . . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Ceeil 

Charles 

I )orchester 

Frederick 

( larrett 

Harford 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince (Jeorge's 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

VVashington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



222 



Ninety-Se\^nth Annual Report 



TABLE 93 — Expenditures of Public Funds for Transportation : Cost per Public School 
Pupil Transported: Number and Per Cent Transported: Counties of Maryland — 1954-63: 

State of Maryland— 1962-63 



Year 














Cost per 


Number 




Local Unit 


Amount 


Pupil 


Transported 


Per Cent 


COUNTIES OF MARYLAND, 1954-63 


1953-54 


S5, 060, 825 


$31.91 


158, 572 


55.5 


1954-55 


5, 528, 488 


31.79 


173, 889 


55.5 


1955-56 


6. 039, 827 


32.91 


183, 552 


55.5 


1956-57 


6,802,444 


35.41 


192, 126 


55.5 


1957-58 


7,497,938 


37.12 


201, 969 


55.4 


1958-59 


8,238,252 


38.24 


215,414 


55.8 


1959-60 


8,789,916 


38.47 


228,495 


56.1 


1960-61 


9,793,092 


41.68 


234, 933 


54.9 


1961-62 


10,492,037 


41.55 


252, 538 


55.0 


1962-63 


11,482,471 


43.02 


266, 902 


54.7 



BY LOCAL UNIT, 1962-63 



Total State 


$11, 727,215 






269, 575 








433, 222 


$50 


59 


8, 563 


51 


5 


Anne Arundel 


1. 069, 196 


.39. 


27 


27,228 


57 


1 


Baltimore City 


244, 744 






2,673 






Baltimore 


1. 500, 846 


32, 


48 


46,211 


48 





Calvert 


303, 110 


67 


40 


4,497 


94 


8 




249, 102 


67, 


75 


3,677 


78 


6 


Carroll 


415,373 


45. 


81 


9,068 


79 


5 


Cecil 


345, 028 


45. 


97 


7, 506 


73 


8 




373,927 


50 


59 


7,391 


90 


5 


Dorchester 


317, 142 


91 


08 


3.482 


55 


4 




443, 657 


46 


23 


9, 597 


63 


3 


Garrett 


343, 335 


78 


96 


4,348 


90 


1 




827,084 


59 


33 


13,940 


76 


7 


Howard 


361. 129 


44 


95 


8, 033 


89 


7 


Kent 


157, 544 


65 


26 


2,414 


70 


7 




1, 182,358 


31 


36 


37, 702 


40 


7 


Queen Anne's 


978,657 


26 


49 


36,949 


45 


1 


225,670 


66 


22 


3,408 


85 


4 


St. Mary's 


303, 844 


51 


68 


5, 879 


88 
65 


6 






222. 401 


77 


44 


2, 872 


Talbot 


177,393 


72 


85 


2,435 


56 


5 


Washington 


536, 101 


48 


87 


10,970 


53 


7 




403, 423 


64 


16 


6,288 


57 


.6 




312,929 


70 


42 


4,444 


77 






Note: Per cent transported and per pupil costs for Baltimore City and Total State are not showTi because 
i n Baltimore City only 1.5 per cent of total enrollment is transported. 



Maryland State Department of E^ducation 



223 



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Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of EIducation 



225 



TABLE 96 — Participation and Reimbursement Paid: Special Milk Program: 
Maryland Public Schools: 1956-63 





Number of 


Per Cent of 


Total Number 






Approved 


Total Schools 


of One-half 


Reimburse- 


Year 


Schools 


in State 


Pints Milk 


ment 




Participating 


Participating 


Reimbursable 


Paid 


Local Unit 


in Program 


in Program 






1955-56 


772 


82.2 


21. 833, 604 


S 820,471 


1956-57 


818 


85.6 


26, 390, 908 


983, 689 


1957-58 


874 


89.5 


28,715,326 


1,080,048 


1958-59 


914 


92.7 


36,390, 152 


1,286,797 


1959-60 


943 


94.2 


35, 555, 378 


1.354, 115 


1960-61 


960 


93.5 


37,398,754 


1,436,752 


1961-62 


978 


93.9 


42.251,724 


1,590. 134 


1962-63 


1,014 


95.1 


45, 931,042 


1, 724, 716 



BY LOCAL UNIT, 1962-63 





32 


94 


1 


1,100,805 


44,033 




75 


100 





4,427,771 


175,409 




186 


100 





9. 823,232 


313.839 


Baltimore 


110 


96 


5 


7.970,250 


312, 578 


Calvert 


15 


93 


7 


280,857 


10, 588 


Caroline 


11 


100 





198, 040 


6,668 


Carroll 


25 


100 





524, 668 


20. 987 


Cecil 


22 


88 





538, 693 


17,498 


Charles 


14 


93 


3 


608, 533 


23.953 


Dorchester 


19 


73 


1 


244, 049 


9,589 


Frederick 


33 


100 





480, 302 


18,847 


Garrett 


17 


89 


5 


268, 792 


10,435 


Harford 


26 


100 





1, 193,466 


39, 862 


Howard 


20 


100 





918,279 


34.410 


Kent 


13 


100 





193, 166 


7.557 




116 


89 


2 


6,607,679 


262.049 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


145 


98 


6 


7,841. 592 


310,914 


13 


92 


9 


198,856 


7,681 


St. Mary's 


18 


94 


7 


385,644 


14, 518 


Somerset 


12 


66 


7 


115, 545 


4. 179 


Talbot 


11 


78 


6 


189, 064 


7. 562 




45 


97 


8 


936,668 


37.411 




23 


100 





633, 107 


24. 923 




13 


76 


5 


251,984 


9,226 



226 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



227 



TABLE 98 — Participation and Types of Lunches Served : National School 
Lunch Program : Maryland Public Schools : 1962-63 



Local Unit 


Number of 
Approved 
Schools 
Participating 
in Program 


Per Cent of 
Total Schools 

in State 
Participating 

in Program 


Average 
Daily 
Participation 


Per Cent of 
Total Average 
Number Be- 
longing in State 
Participating 
in Program 


Total 
Number of 
Type A* 
Lunches 
Served 


Total State 


863 


80 


9 


217, 505 


34.1 


36,575,756 


Allegany 


32 


94 


1 


10,957 


66.2 


1,821,923 


Anne Arundel .... 


75 


100 





13,489 


28.5 


2,328, 535 


Baltimore City . . . 


95 


51 


1 


19.436 


12.0 


3,309,716 


Baltimore 


106 


93 





37,262 


38.9 


6,276,717 


Calvert 




68 


7 


1,370 


29.4 


229,689 


Caroline 




81 


8 


2,408 


52.5 


399, 536 


Carroll 




100 





6,032 


53.1 


1,007.567 


Cecil 


22 


88 





3,989 


39.6 


669,967 


Charles 


12 


80 





2,125 


26.2 


349, 388 


Dorchester 


18 


69 


2 


2.257 


36.1 


383, 278 


Frederick 


33 


100 





9, 188 


61.2 


1, 531, 150 


Garrett 


14 


73 


7 


2,984 


62.1 


493, 924 


Harford 


25 


96 


1 


9,991 


55.3 


1.653,788 


Howard 


19 


95 





4,093 


45.7 


687.253 


Kent 


11 


84 


6 


1.574 


46.5 


264, 569 


Montgomery 


109 


83 


8 


31, 651 


37.7 


5.357,818 


Prince George's. . . 
Queen Anne's. . . . 


132 


89 


8 


34,650 


42.3 


5.848,409 


10 


71 


4 


2.229 


56.7 


374,930 


St. J.Iary's 


13 


68 


4 


2,324 


35.9 


366,731 


Somerset 


8 


44 


4 


1,089 


24.9 


187,616 


Talbot 


11 


78 


6 


1.722 


40.2 


279. 343 


Washington 


44 


95 


7 


11, 174 


56.8 


1.823,285 




20 


86 


9 


3,690 


33.6 


619, 519 


Worcester 


9 


52 


9 


1.821 


32.5 


311,105 



* Type A — pt. milk, 2 oz. protein, ^ c. vegetables and/or fruit, 1 serving bread, 2 taps, butter or 
fortified margarine. 



228 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 99 — Capital Outlay Expenditures : Maryland Local Boards of Education : 
Year Ending June 30, 1963 



Local Unit 


1 

Total 


Expenditures for Capital Outlay 


Elementary 

1 


High 


Administration 
Buildings 


Community 
Colleges 


Total State... 


873,722, 185 


$32,387,877 


$39,428,981 


$625,685 


SI, 279, 642 


Allegany 


283,272 


128, 702 


114,294 


.... 


40,276 


Anne Arundel . . . 


3, 670, 702 


2,593,060 


1,013,731 


54, 6i9 


9,892 


Baltimore City. . 


14,554,604 


7, 517, 820 


6,553,799 


179,020 


303, 965 


Baltimore 


17,699,593 


6.892,618 


10,344,255 


13, 194 


449, 526 


Calvert 


97,236 j 


4,395 


92, 807 


34 




Caroline 


485,653 


19,856 


465, 797 






CarroU 


361,895 ! 


202,947 


157,310 


1,"638 




Cecil 


1,060,395 


1,025,561 


34,834 






Charles 


502,118 1 


i 166,721 


330, 668 


2,389 


2,' 340 


Dorchester 


406.816 1 


61,353 


345, 463 






Frederick 


689,773 


' 312, 009 


372, 827 


1,905 


3,032 


Garrett 


244. 652 


159, 179 


85,473 






Harford 


1,775,744 


1,442,112 


118,487 


18," i87 


196.958 


Howard 


890, 591 


524,515 


366, 076 






Kent 


178,050 


97, 013 


80, 737 


'300 




Montgomery .... 


15, 017, 743 


5, 154, 591 


9,636,809 


206, 375 


19,968 


Prince George's. . 
Queen Anne's 


13,742,750 


5,424,197 


7,968.730 


148, 135 


201, 688 


186, 540 


104, 958 


81. 582 






St. Mary's 


254, 384 


57,685 


196,699 








30, 030 


9, 195 

1 


20,835 






Talbot 


57,616 


40,979 


16,637 






Washington 


199, 942 


63, 834 


83,916 


'i95 


51," 997 




1,098,449 


176,695 


921,460 


294 






233,637 


' 207,882 


25,755 







Maryland State Department of Education 



229 



TABLE 100 — Value* of Maryland Public School Property per Pupil Belonging: 
Year Ending June 30, 1963 





Total 


Elementary 


High 


Local Unit 
















Total 


Average 


Total 


Average 


Total 


Average 




Value 


per Pupil 


Value 


per Pupil 


Value 


per Pupil 


Total State . . . . 


$848, 367, 046 


SI. 303 


«411,881,093 


31,099 


$436,485,953 


$1,581 




22, 395, 700 


1,853 


8, 121, 110 


999 


14,274,590 


1,695 


Anne Arundel . . . 


60, 432, 103 


1,274 


27,360, 152 


988 


33, 071,951 


1,676 


Baltimore Cityr. 


183,299,718 


1,080 


89,831,570 


876 


93,468, 148 


1,393 


Baltimore 


134, 615, 676 


1,404 


65,892,303 


1,248 


68,723,373 


1, 595 


Calvert 


4,954,600 


1,061 


2, 048, 100 


697 


2,906, 500 


1,679 




7, 575, 604 


1,640 


2,705,326 


1,013 


4,870,278 


2, 500 


Carroll 


12,395, 635 


1,091 


7,121,339 


1, 136 


5,274,296 


1, 035 


Cecil 


17,855,250 


1,774 


7,641,750 


1,277 


10,213, 500 


2, 501 


Charles 


9,846,357 


1,213 


4,385, 020 


919 


5,461,337 


1,635 


Dorchester 


8, 191,400 


1,311 


3,346,400 


961 


4,845, 000 


1,753 


Frederick 


20,736,430 


1,381 


10, 099, 180 


1,247 


10,637,250 


1,537 


Garrett 


5,857.000 


1,218 


3,247,000 


1, 176 


2,610,000 


1,275 


Harford 


31,389,096 


1,738 


16, 775,308 


1,632 


14,613,788 


1,877 




8,928,600 


997 


4,697,200 


947 


4,231,400 


1,060 


Kent 


3,744,600 


1, 105 


1,938, 598 


995 


1, 806, 002 


1,255 


Alontgomery .... 


128,859,457 


1,459 


73,449,890 


1,446 


55,409,567 


1,477 


Prince George's. . 
Queen Anne's. . . . 


111, 194,950 


1,357 


48,700,152 


1,040 


62,494.798 


1,778 


3,821,979 


972 


1,662.850 


736 


2, 159, 129 


1,290 


St. Mary's 


7, 513, 703 


1, 156 


3, 215, 050 


836 


4,298,653 


1.620 


Somerset 


4,712,768 


1,078 


1,866,625 


749 


2,846, 143 


1, 515 


Talbot 


7,276,875 


1,698 


3,272,356 


1,317 


4, 004, 519 


2,222 




26,381,945 


1,319 


13,298,954 


1,217 


13,082,991 


1,441 


Wicomico 


18,646,600 


1,698 


7,846,960 


1,212 


10, 799, 640 


2,395 




7,741,000 


1, 368 


3,357,900 


1,018 


4,383, 100 


1,855 



* Value based on 100 per cent of the insured valuation for each school building and the equipment thereof. 
Value of sites has been excluded. 

t Baltimore City shows value of buildings and equipment as carried by the Bureau of Accounts and 
Disbursements; this valuation does not constitute the basis for insurance. 



230 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Keport 



TABLE 101 — Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness Related to Assessed 

Valuation: June 30, 1963 





School Bonded Indebtedness as of 
June 30, 1963 

i County ' State 
Total j Bonds Loanf 


1962 Assessed 
Valuation 

'Full T?nfp for 

County 
Purposes 


Assessed 
Valuation 
psr Dollar 

BondGd In- 
debtedness 


PerTCent 
School 
Bonci6(i In 
dcbtodnGss 
is of Assess^ 
Valuation 


Total State 


S504, 069, 147 


$402, 867, 767 


$101,201,380 


$9,710, 599,732 


$19 


5.2 


Allegany 


4,755,847 


1,637, 000 


3, 118,847 


197,448,462 


41 


2.4 


Anne Arundel. . . . 


38, 096, 026 


33, 804, 000 


4,292, 026 


513, 838, 094 


13 


7.4 


Baltimore City. . . 


*106, 139, 000 


*106, 139,000 




2,718, 154,473 


26 


3.9 




111,924,352 


80, 727, 000 


31, 197,' 352 


1,843,346,013 


16 


6.1 


Calvert 


2, 559, 009 


1,844,000 


715, 009 


34,058,957 


13 


7.5 


Caroline 


3,207,900 


2,605,000 


602,900 


40, 125,620 


13 


8.0 


Carroll 


2,047,201 


200, 000 


1,847,201 


157,536,477 


77 


1.3 


Cecil 


7,716,811 


5. 545, 000 


2, 171,811 


110,330,915 


14 


7.0 


Charles 


2,236,677 


709, 000 


1, 527,677 


72,798,263 


33 


3.1 


Dorchester 


4,219, 596 


3,843.300 


376,296 


75,647,328 


18 


5.6 


Frederick 


14,141.128 


11,345,000 


2,796, 128 


222,840, 525 


16 


6.3 


Garrett 


1, 519, 586 


875. 000 


644, 586 


42,709,888 


28 


3.5 


Harford 


17,737,847 


17,278,000 


459, 847 


216,267,684 


12 


8.2 


Howard 


4.712,026 


2, 149.000 


2, 563, 026 


142,045,738 


30 


3.3 


Kent 


1, 179,248 


725, 000 


454,248 


47,653,898 


40 


2.5 


Montgomery 


85,270,073 


60,223,467 


25, 046,606 


1,516,403,185 


18 


5.6 


Prince George's . . 
Queen Anne's. . . . 


69,912,697 


55, 012, 000 


14,900,697 


1,039, 176,815 


15 


6.7 


1,452.900 


935, 000 


517,900 


49,973,228 


34 


2.9 


St. Mary's 


1,290,129 




1,290, 129 


57,735,443 


45 


2.2 


Somerset 


2,063.234 


1,640, '666 


423,234 


29, 525, 618 


14 


7.0 


Talbot 


2,598,877 


1, 725, 000 


873, 877 


70,923, 030 


27 


3.7 


Washington 


*10,740, 130 


7. 280, 000 


*3,460, 130 


267,310, 500 


25 


4.0 


Wicomico 


6,618,318 


5, 672,000 


946,318 


149,206,796 


23 


4.4 


Worcester 


1,930, 535 


955, 000 


975, 535 


95, 542,782 


49 


2.0 



* Includes following bonded indebtedness for communitv colleges: Baltimore City, $857,000; Washington, $50,000; 
total, .$907,000. 

t General School Construction Loan. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



231 



TABLE 102 — Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness* and Interest Payments 
per Pupil Belonging— K-12: June 30, 1963 





School 




Local Unit 


Bonded 


Interest , 




Indebtedness 


Payments j 


Total State 


$773.11 


S21.94 j 


Allegany 


287.38 


7.49 1 


Anne Arundel 


803.26 


27.60 ! 


Baltimore City. . . . 


620.51 


16.63 ! 




1, 167.56 


34.92 


Calvert 


548.24 


21.29 


Caroline 


694.44 


19.03 


Carroll 


180.20 


4.32 


Cecil 


766.61 


20.99 


Charles 


275.66 


7.79 1 


Dorchester 


675.48 


18.87 




941.46 


! 

23.82 



Local Unit 



School 
Bonded 
Indebtedness 



Interest 
Payments 



li Garrett. 
" Harford. 
Howard . 
Kent . . . 



Montgomery. . . . 
Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's. . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 



Talbot • 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



316.09 


8.60 


982.01 


20.40 


526.26 


14.36 


348.13 


9.89 


965.47 


26.31 


853.04 


24.88 


369.47 


10.23 


199.62 


5.43 


472 . 10 


14.33 


606.31 


14.68 


543.65 


15.62 


602.55 


17.72 


344 . 55 


9.23 



* Includes General School Construction Loan. 



232 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 103— Calculated School Tax Rates and Published Tax Rates: State of Maryland: 1962-63 





Calculated School Tax Rates* 




Additional 












Published 


Rates in 


Local Unit 










Tax 


Districts and 






Current 


Capital 


Debt 


Ratest 


Incorporated 




Total 


Expenses 


Outlay 


Service 




Placest 


Total State 


$2.08 


$1.70 


$0.09 


$0.29 






Allegany 


1.46 


al.28 


0.02 


0.16 


$1.85 


$.08-$1.57 


Anne Arundel° 


1.87 


al.42 




0.45 


2.09 


1.25- 1.55 


Baltimore City° 


2.04 


1.78 


o.'is 


0.13 


3.91 




Baltimore" 


2.14 


01.71 


0.05 


0.38 


2.. 54 




Calvert 


2.53 


al.64 


0.30 


0.59 


2.25 


.75^'l!l5 




2.12 


1.51 


0.06 


0.55 


2.30 


.25- 1.15 


CarrolP 


1.76 


1.46 


0.12 


0.18 


1.95 


.50- .85 


Cecil 


1.98 


al.48 


0.01 


0.49 


2.35 


.35- 1.35 


Charles 


1.62 


al.l3 


0.27 


0.22 


1.65 


.50- .65 




1.56 


1.29 




0.27 


1.90 


.10- 1.60 


Frederick" 


1.82 


al.45 


0.03 


0.34 


1.88 


.10- 1.55 


Garrett" 


1.58 


1.10 


0.21 


0.27 


2.. 35 


.40- .90 


Harford" 


1.54 


al.27 




0.27 


1.75 


1.00- 1.15 


Howard" 


1.55 


al.27 


o!i3 


0.15 


1.85 




Kent" 


1.94 


al.33 


0.30 


0.31 


1.90 


.20- ".'85 


Montgomery 


2.51 


a2.15 


0.04 


0.32 


2.90 


.06- .98 


Prince George's 9. . . 


2.33 


al.71 


0.19 


0.43 


2.42 


.25- 1.31 


Queen Anne's" 


1.73 


1.39 


0.08 


0.26 


2.00 


.20- .73 




1.45 


al.09 


0.09 


0.27 


1.95 


.90 


Somerset 


1.59 


1.32 


0.05 


0.22 


1.95 


.70- 1.45 


Talbot 


1.55 


1.15 


0.07 


0.33 


2.10 


.95- 1.15 


Washington" 


1.79 


al.50 


0.02 


0.27 


1.98 


.35- .85 




1.80 


1.26 


0.09 


0.45 


1.92 


.40- 1.26 




1.67 


1.23 


0.25 


0.19 


1.80 


.90- 1.40 



* Calculated by dividing tax funds received by Local Boards of Education by total assessed valuations as used in calculation of Stat* 
aid payments. 

t Rates are for fiscal period on which district operates. State property tax and special service levies are excluded. 
t Figures are from reports made to State Fiscal Research Bureau . 
" Calendar year fiscal period. 

a Excludes federal funds authorized by Public Law 874 as amended. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



233 



TABLE 104 — Local Revenue Appropriations for Programs Operated by Local Boards of 
Education: State of Maryland: 1962-63 



Local Unit 


Local 
Revenue* 


Appropriations for Public ScHooLst 


Per Cent of Total Revenue 
Appropriated for Public Schools 


All School 
Purposes 


Current 

Expenses 


! 

i Capital 
1 Outlay 

1 


1 

1 Debt 
Service 


AU 
School 
Purposes 


Current 
Expenses 


Capital 
Outlay 


Debt 
Service 


Total State 


S420,130,535 


$192,493,391 


1 

$159,368,631 


1 

$6,805,534 


$26 


.319,226 


45.8 


37.9 


1.6 


6.3 


Allegany 


7,351,691 


2,784,729 


2,438,794 


45,799 




300,136 


37.9 


33.2 


0.6 


4.1 


Anne ArundelJ. . . . 


19,036,988 


9,051,794 


7,452,616 




1 


,599,178 


47.5 


39.1 




8.4 


Baltimore CityJ . . . 


157,193,864 


51,265,483 


46,307,165 


2,020,483 


2 


,937,835 


32.6 


29.4 


i.'.s 


1.9 


Baltiraoret 


64,418,494 


35,530,509 


28,162,563 


656,883 


6 


,711,063 


55.1 


43.7 


1.0 


10.4 


Calvert 


1,452,488 


849,268 


548,227 


102,000 




199.041 


58.4 


37.7 


7.0 


13.7 


Caroline 


1,768,426 


830,440 


593,139 


24,025 




213,276 


46.9 


33.5 


1.4 


12.0 


CarrolU 


4,879,514 


2,950,818 


2,273,026 


406.415 




271.377 


60.5 


46.6 


8.3 


5.6 


Cecil 


4,139,829 


2,194,087 


1,642,195 


14,900 




536, 992 j 


53.0 


39.7 


0.3 


13.0 


Charles 


2.775,330 


1,159,474 


812,497 


191,204 




155,773 


41.8 


29.3 


6.9 


5.6 




2,922,900 


1,040,640 


837,714 






202,926 


35.6 


28.7 




6.9 


Frederick^ 


7,508,176 


3,813,736 


3,136,400 


25,753 




651,583 


50.8 


41.8 


0.3 


8.7 


GarrettJ 


2,105,245 


619,343 


456,077 


20,415 




142,851 


29.4 


21.6 


1.0 


6.8 


Harfordt 


6,277,8451 


3,448,502 


2.875,811 






572,691 


54.9 


45.8 




9.1 


Howard j 


4,099,7821 


2,003,346 


1.645,752 


101,593 




256,001 


48.8 


40.1 


'2.'5 


6.2 


Kent.J 


1,543,072 


870,022 


595,197 


142,839 




131,986 


56.4 


38.6 


9.3 


8.5 


Montgomery 


65,056,135 


37,654,019 


32,175,704 


589,384 


4 


888,931 


57.9 


49.5 


0.9 


7.5 


Prince George's. . . . 


42,988,065 


23,787.271 


17,484,577 


1.911,867 


4 


390.827 


55.3 


40.7 


4.4 


10.2 


Queen Anne'sJ .... 


1.692,4171 


792,459 


626,438 


29,946 




136,075 


46.8 


37.0 


1.8 


8.0 


St. Mary's 


2,271,124 


826,615 


619,362 


52,786 




154.467 


36.4 


27.3 


2.3 


6.8 




1,219,961 


457,866 


379,991 


15,000 




62,875 


37.5 


31.2 


1.2 


5.1 


Talbot 


2,564,878 


1,081,828 


802,934 


50,250 




228, 644 


42.2 


31.3 


2.0 


8.9 


Washington^ 


8,120,910i 


5,273,832 


4,501,561 


33,500 




738,771 


64.9 


55.4 


0.4 


9.1 


Wicomico 


5,375,2151 


2,630,903 


1,847,891 


126,245; 




656,767 


48.9 


34.4 


2.3 


12.2 


Worcester 


3,368,186 


1,576,407 


1,153,000 

1 


244,247 




179,160 


46.8 


34.2 


7.3 


5.3 



* Figures from State Fiscal Research Bureau: include taxes, licenses and permits, and fines and forfeitures, 
t Figures from annual financial reports of Local Boards of Education adjusted to conform to county's fiscal period. 
t County operates on calendar year. Revenue here reported is that of 1962. 



234 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 105—1962-63 Valuation of Property Assessable at Full Rate for County 
Purposes: State of Maryland 







County Commissioners 






Total 








State 


Local Unit 


Assessable at 








Tax 




Full Rate 






Personal 


Commissionf 






Total 


Real Estate 


Property 





5tal State 


$9, 710, 599, 732 


$7,705,808,302 


.?7, 509, 152, 528 


$196,655, 774 


$2,004,791,430 


Allegany 


197,448,462 


138,235, 172 


132,293,277 


5,941,895 


59,213,290 


Anne Arundel*. . 


513,838,094 


428,252,024 


422,338, 119 


5,913,905 


85. 586, 070 


Baltimore City*. 


2,718, 154,473 


2,022,906,273 


1,985,702, 533 


37,203,740 


695,248,200 


Baltimore* 


1,843,346.013 


1,501,559, 103 


1,482,350, 583 


19,208,520 


341,786,910 


Calvert 


34,058,957 


29,381,777 


28,214,310 


1, 167,467 


4,677, 180 


Caroline 


40,125,620 


31,614,590 


28,781, 160 


2,833,430 


8, 511,030 


Carroll* 


157, 536,477 


121,073,397 


111, 169,947 


9,903,450 


36,463,080 


Cecil 


110,330,915 


85,036,435 


78,941,410 


6,095, 025 


25,294,480 


Charles 


72,798,263 


60,212,378 


57,474, 568 


2,737,810 


12, 585,885 


Dorchester* 


75, 647,328 


55,623,508 


50,597, 113 


5,026,395 


20,023.820 




222,840, 525 


160,662,965 


135, 582, 775 


25,080, 190 


62, 177, 560 


Garrett* 


42,709,888 


28,709, 758 


25, 139,407 


3,570,351 


14,000,130 


Harford* 


216,267,684 


161,695,304 


153,033,753 


8,661, 551 


54, 572,380 


Howard* 


142, 045, 738 


111,802,228 


108, 092, 553 


3,709,675 


30,243, 510 


Kent* 


47,653,898 


38,374,758 


34,121,198 


4,253,560 


9,279, 140 


Montgomery .... 


1,516,403,185 


1,294,478,235 


1.280,603, 135 


13,875, 100 


221,924,950 


Prince George's. 


1,039, 176,815 


882,308, 025 


873, 028, 075 


9,279,950 


156.868,790 


Queen Anne's* . . 


49,973,228 


42,201, 578 


38,476,046 


3, 725, 532 


7,771,650 


St. Mary's 


57,735, 443 


45, 844, 578 


43,301,561 


2,543,017 


11,890,865 


Somerset 


29, 525,618 


23,030,048 


21,415,374 


1,614,674 


6,495, 570 


Talbot 


70,923,030 


58, 744, 520 


54,614,050 


4, 130,470 


12, 178,510 


Washington*. . . . 


267,310, 500 


193. 534, 570 


182,848,205 


10,686.365 


73, 775,930 




149,206, 796 


110, 562,266 


106,286,887 


4,275,379 


38,644, 530 


Worcester 


95, 542, 782 


79,964,812 


74,746,489 


5,218,323 


15, 577, 970 



* Fiscal period ends December 31; all others end June 30. 

t Data are for the year ended December 31, 1962, adjusted as of October 1, 1963. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



235 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



237 



TABLE 108— High School Equivalence : State of Maryland: 1954-1963 



Year Ending 
June 30 


Number of Applicants Who 


Total Nximber 
of 

Certificates 
Issued 


Completed 
Examination* 


Earned 
Certificate 


Earned Certificate 
through USAFIt 


1954 


1,377 


887 


837 


1,724 


1955 


1.495 


885 


717 


1,602 


1956 


1,476 


854 


967 


1,821 


1957 


1,603 


1 954 


740 


1,694 


1958 


1,802 


963 


837 


1,800 


1959 


1,681 


867 


722 


1,589 


1960 


1, 850 


951 


712 


1,663 


1961 


1,940 


1,002 


833 


1, 835 


1962 


2,327 


1, 181 


719 


1,900 


1963 


2,595 


1,307 


746 


2,053 



* Includes re-tests. 

t United States Armed Forces Institute. 



238 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



239 



TABLE 110 — Federal Funds Alloted and Expended in Maryland: Vocational Education: 

Year Ending June 30, 1963 



Types of 1 
Vocational Program i 


Balance 
July 1, 1962 


1962-63 
Allotment 


1962-63 
E xpenditures 


Balance 
June 30, 1963 


Total 


$124,731 


$625, 564 


$702,937 


$47, 358 


Agriculture 


47 


124, 432 


124, 479 






123, 793 


319,621 


396,056 


47,358 




24 


122, 344 


122, 368 


Teachers Training and Supervision 




17,365 


17,365 




Distributive Occupations | 

1 


867 


41, 802 


42,669 





* Includes Practical Nurse Training and Technical. 



TABLE 111 — Expenditures for Administration and Supervision and Teacher Training 
in Vocational Education: State of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1963 



Sources of Expenditures 


Type of Vocational Program 


Total 


Agriculture 


Trades and 
Industry 


Home 
Economics 


Distributive 
Occupations 


Total 












State and University Funds . . 


$57, 479 


$18,425 


$23,486 


$14, 963 


$605 


Federal Funds 


60, 357 


20, 406 


23,486 


15, 860 


605 


State Administration and 












Supervision 












State Funds 


35, 699 


10. 190 


14, 641 


10.263 


605 


Federal Funds 


38. 577 


12, 171 


14,641 


11, 160 


605 


Teacher Training 












University of Maryland 












Funds 


21,780 


8,235 


8,845 


4,700 




Federal Funds 


21,780 


8,235 


8,845 


4,700 





240 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 112— Expenditures of Federal Funds in Maryland: 
Year Ending June 30, 1963 



Type op Vocational Program 



Type of Expenditures 


Total 


Agriculture 


Trades and 
Industry* 


Home 
Economics 


Distributive 
Occupations 


Total 


$702, 937 


$132,231 


$399, 529 


$128, 508 


$42,669 


Instruction 












Adult Education 


117,488 


2,885 


49,907 


57, 701 


6,995 


Secondary 


321,218 


86, 326 


159, 174 


42,407 


33,311 


Past Secondary 


25,401 




25,401 








57, 397 


14,663 


29,262 


12 "226 


1,246 


Equipment 


112, 508 




112, 508 








15, 567 


7,95i 


6,790 


"3i4 


512 


Teacher Training 


21,780 


8,235 


8,845 


4,700 




State Administration and 












Supervision 


31,578 


12, 171 


7,642 


11, 160 


605 



* Includes Practical Nurse Training and Technical. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



241 



TABLE 113 — Adult Education: Receipts and Expenditures: State of Maryland 
Year Ending June 30, 1963 



Local Unit 


Receipts for Adult Education from | 
Sources Other than Local 1 


Expenditures for Adult 
Education 


1 otai 


Federal j 


State 


Fees from ! 
Attendance 


Total 


Salaries 


Expenses 


rotai State 


S548,913 


§249,902 


S86, 544 


1 

S212,467 1 


Sl,043,014 


$941,965 


S101.049 


Allegany 


14.910 


9,910 


2, 532 


2,468 


17, 684 


13, 768 


3,916 


Anae Arundel . . 


6,490 


773 


1,632 


4,085 


7,489 


7,384 


105 


Baltimore City . 


227, 858 


135.821 


32,013 


60,024 


615,339 


556, 940 


58, 399 


Baltimore 


48, 742 


16. 106 


13,316 


19, 320 


117,677 


115,425 


2,252 


Calvert 


3,346 


2.616 


730 




2,930 


690 


2,240 


Caroline 


1, 111 


91 


729 


291 


981 


981 




Carroll 


3,710 


861 


1,878 


971 


3,383 


3,308 


' '75 


Cecil 


4,489 


537 


1,487 


2,465 


3, 108 


3,029 


79 




1,158 


553 


605 




1,457 


1.457 




Dorchester 


2,130 


782 


1,292 


■ 56 


2,139 


2, 139 






8,788 


4,886 


2,724 


1, 178 


16,260 


15,381 


879 


Garrett 


6,272 


5, 177 


1,095 




5,999 


822 


5,177 




6,839 


1,099 


2,220 


3,526 


9,020 


8. 515 


505 




272 




272 




736 


736 




Kent 


1, 559 


555 


612 


392 


3, 145 


2,960 


185 


Montgomery . . . 


101,491 


22, 583 


6,223 


72, 685 


97,767 


93,606 


4, 161 


Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's. . 


63,425 


11,089 


8,375 


43,961 


90,696 


82, 194 


8,502 


1,801 


1,329 


472 




1,774 


1.774 




St. Mary's 


3,949 


1,777 


2, 172 




3, 580 


2.968 


'612 


Somerset 


930 




930 




1, 101 


1, 101 




Talbot 










1. 120 


1. 120 




Washington. . . . 


38,439 


33,264 


5, i75 




35. 392 


21, 604 


13,788 


Wicomico 


1 969 






969 


3, 656 


3, 527 


129 




235 


93 


' 60 


82 


581 


536 


45 



242 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



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243 



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244 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



245 



TABLE 116 — Vocational Adult Education Programs*: By Title of Course and Number 
of Classes: State of Maryland: 1962-63 



Title of Course 



Agriculture 

Arc welding 

Farm machine repair 

Other agriculture 

Total 

Distributive Education 

Investments 

Other (one class in each course) 
business law, color, display, 
fashion, hidden power, human 
relations 

Total 

Home Economics 

Clothing 

Cooking 

Crafts 

Family living 

Flower arrangement 

Food supervision 

Furniture upholstering, repairing 

Home nursing 

Interior decorating 

Knitting 

Millinery 

Rug making 

Self improvement 

Sewing 

Slipcovers 

Tailoring 

Other home economics 

Total 

Trades and Industry 

Air conditioning 

Apprenticeship training course. . . 

Auto mechanics 

Auto t heory and practice 

Barboring 

Blueprint reading and drafting. . 



Number of 
Classes 



10 



108 
15 
3 
9 
4 
1 
4 
10 
11 
3 
14 
11 
10 
76 
4 
30 
18 

331 



Title of Course 



Trades and Industry — Continued 

Building construction and brick- 
laying 

Cosmetology 

Electricity 

Electronics 

Furniture repair and cabinet mak- 
ing 

Industrial safety 

Machine shop 

Mechanical drawing 

Plumbing 

Printing trades 

Radio-television 

Refrigeration 

Related English 

Related mathematics 

Stationary engineering 

Tailoring 

Welding 

Woodworking 

Other (one class in each course): 
airframe and power plant, 
baking, basic shop, boiler opera- 
tion and safety, custodial 
training, food service, home 
nursing, job instruction training 
and job relations training, oil 
burner, orchestra training, sew- 
ing, shoe repairing, supervisory 
management, trowel trades, 
upholstery 

Total 

Technical Education 

Avionics Drafting 

Electronics 

Programming 

Other (one class in each course): 
aerodynamics, industrial elec- 
tricity, mechanical engineering, 
network theory, report writing, 
stress analysis, transistor en- 
gineering, quality control 

Total 



* Programs administered by local boards of education. 



246 Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



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Maryland 



State Department of Education 



247 



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248 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



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250 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 121 — Enrollment by College and Class: Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 

Fall of 1962 



Class 


j Grand 


Bowie 


COPPIN 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


TOWSON' 




1 Total 


1 











TEACHER TRAINING 



Total 


4,042 


341 


371 


1, 164 


436 


1 

1.730 


Freshman .... 


1,408 


126 


99 


444 


164 


1 575 


Sophomore . . . 


995 


77 


80 


292 


119 


427 


Junior 


818 


78 


84 


216 


73 


! 367 


Senior 


812 


56 


106 


212 


80 


; 358 


Fifth Year 


9 


1 4 


2 


... 




3 


ARTS AND science 


Total 


371 






157 


63 


151 


Freshman .... 


193 






84 


35 


74 


Sophomore . . . 


92 






38 


21 


: 33 


Junior. 


63 






26 


6 


! 31 


Senior 


23 






9 


1 


i 13 



OTHER STUDENTS 



Total 


415 


25 




225 


52 


113 


Extension: 

Graduate 

Undergraduate 
Nurses | 


1 

180 
109 
78 


*i9 


... 


144 
13 
43 


■35 


36 
77 




48 


" 6 




25 


17 






... 




CAMPUS SCHOOL 


Elementary. . . 1 


1, 157 


261 


209 


234 


201 


252 



Maryland State Department of Education 



251 



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252 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 123 — Enrollment in Arts and Science: Maryland State Teachers Colleges by 

County: Fall of 1962 



Area 


Grand 
Total 


Bowie 


COPPIN 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Towson 


Grand Total 


371 






157 


63 


151 


Out-of-State 


15 






9 


5 


1 


Allegany 


112 






112 








5 i. 




4 




* "i 


Baltimore City 


78 


1 




1 


. . 


77 




73 






5 


2 


66 


Calvert 














Caroline 


5 








5 




Carroll 


2 


! 




' 2 






Cecil 


2 










Charles 














Dorchester 


■ 3 








' 3 




Frederick 


2 






2 








8 






8 






Harford 


2 












Howard 


1 


i ... 




"i 






Kent 




1 ... 










Montgomery 


2 






2 






Prince George's 


7 






6 


■ i 
















St. Mary's 


■ i 












Somerset 


7 






::: 


" '7 




Talbot 


1 






1 






Washington 


6 






4 


' "i 




Wicomico 


31 


! ••• 






31 




Worcester 


8 






... 


8 





Maryland State Department of Education 253 



TABLE 124— Cost per Student at Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 1954-1963 



Year 
Ending 


Average 
Enroll- 
ment 


Current Expenses 


1 

i Average Anmual Cost per 
1 Student 

1 


Total 


Paid by 
Students 


Paid by 

State 


1 

j Total 


In Student 

Fees* 


To 
State 


BOWIE 


1954 


343 


$351,712 


$72, 599 


S279, 113 


$1,025 


$211 


$814 


1955 


338 


363, 046 


75,092 


287,954 


1 1, 074 


222 


852 


1956 


321 


388,296 


71, 585 


316,711 


1,210 


223 


987 


1957 


301 


435,714 


70, 800 


364,914 


1, 447 


235 


1,212 


1958 


305 


454, 809 


72, 839 


381,970 


1,491 


239 


1,252 


1959 


330 


472, 120 


91, 132 


380,988 


i 1,431 


276 


1, 155 


1960 


346 


513, 573 


92,985 


420, 588 


1,484 


269 


1,215 


1961 


380 


580, 229 


98, 844 


481,385 


1, 527 


260 


1,267 


1962 


346 


630, 615 


119,484 


511, 131 


1 1, 823 


346 


1,477 


1963 


343 


651,816 


105,068 


546,748 


1 1, 900 


306 


1, 594 



COPPIN 



1957 




289 


1 

S238, 292 


$10,352 


$227, 940 


1 $825 


$36 


$789 


1958 




317 


262, 896 


11, 179 


251,717 


! 829 


35 


794 


1959 




347 1 


286, 047 


13, 584 


272,463 


: 824 


39 


785 


1960. . 




352 1 


332,064 


12. 529 


319, 535 


1 943 


35 


908 


1961 




354 


410,974 


12, 982 


397, 992 


! 1,161 


37 


1, 124 


1962 




353 


490, 590 


22,044 


468, 546 


1 1,390 


63 


1,327 


1963 




371 


523, 626 


24,096 


499, 530 


1,411 


65 


1,346 



frostburg 



1954 


394 


$418,682 


1955 


458 ; 


459, 180 


1956 


564 


484, 506 


1957 


548 


585, 568 


1958 


533 


660,283 


1959, 


659 


741, 680 


1960 


799 


865,201 


1961 


1,002 


1, 054, 647 


1962 


1, 179 


1,232,485 


1963 


1,375 1 


1,505,445 



$58,716 
57, 667 
65, 589 
63,651 
75, 669 
114, 939 
163, 727 
203, 947 
293,659 
366,496 



$359, 966 
401, 513 
418,917 
521.917 
584,614 
626,741 
701,474 
850, 700 
938, 826 
1, 138, 949 



063 i 
003 ! 
859 ■ 
068 1 
239 
125 
083 ! 
053 ' 
045 
095 



$149 
126 
116 
116 
142 
174 
205 
204 
249 
267 



$914 
877 
743 
952 

,097 
951 
878 
849 
796 
828 



SALISBURY 



1954 


250 


$343, 124 


$41,983 


$301,141 


$1,372 ! 


$168 


$1,204 


1955 


338 


386, 826 


64,918 


321,908 1 


1, 144 


192 


952 


1956 


362 


416, 580 


68,945 


347,635 1 


1,151 1 


191 


960 


1957 


313 


450,320 


51,424 


398,896 


1,439 i 


164 


1,275 


1958 


337 


1 494, 967 


49, 515 


445,452 1 


1,469 1 


147 


1,322 


1959 


343 


510, 803 


62,672 


448, 131 1 


1,489 1 


183 


1,306 


1960 


381 


1 543, 933 


85,709 


458,224 1 


1,428 1 


225 


1,203 


1961 


393 


617,078 


99,357 


517,721 


1,570 : 


253 


1,317 


1962 


505 


658,456 


132,327 


526,129 


1,304 ' 


262 


1,042 


1963 


487 


712, 155 


135,032 


577,123 


1,462 1 
1 


277 


1, 185 



1954 
1955 
1956 
1957 
1958 
1959 
1960 
1961 
1962 
1963 



893 
1, 033 
1, 170 
1,233 
1,232 
1,345 
1,434 
1,563 
1,680 
1,907 



! $962,662 
i 1,024,421 

1, 120,202 
I 1,239,538 
I 1,370,552 

1,483,923 

1, 605, 057 
1,833,698 
1,940,347 

2, 135,419 

I 



5135, 050 
173, 733 
180, 904 
196,399 
210,037 
278,001 
283, 139 
310,910 
395, 000 
418, 846 



i $827,612 
I 850,688 
, 939,298 
! 1,043, 139 
;1, 160, 515 
1,205,922 
1,321,918 
1, 522, 788 
1, 545, 347 
1,716,573 



$1,078 
992 
957 
1,005 
1, 112 
1, 103 
1, 119 
1. 173 
1, 155 
1. 120 



$151 
168 
154 
159 
170 
207 
197 
199 
235 
220 



$927 
824 
803 
846 
942 
896 
922 
974 
920 
900 



* In accordance with Chapter 6 of the Laws of 1945, tuition for teacher training students at the Teachers 
Colleges was eliminated as of September, 1945. Begiiming in 1961-62 board is $312 at Bowie, Frostburg, 
Salisbury, and Towson, for teacher training students planning to teach in Maryland. Junior college students 
who are residents of Maryland pay $200 additional; out-of-state students pay $450 for either junior college or 
teacher education curriculum. 



254 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Eeport 



TABLE 125 — Source of Expenditures*: Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 
Year Ending June 30, 1963 







Total Expendittjres for Current Expenses Paid by 


State 
Teachers 
College 


Grand 
Total 


State 


Students 


1 

General 
Administration 


Instruction 


Dietary Services 


Plant Operation 
and Maintenance 






State 


Students 


State 


Students 


State 


Students 


State 


Students 


Total 


S 

5,528,461 
651,816 


$ 

4,478,923 
516,748 


S 

1.049,538 
105.068 


$ 

644.357 
82.451 


16,786 


$ 

2,839,293 
272,351 


% 

346,205 
9,888 


$ 

143,647 
30.829 


S 

520,962 


$ 

851,626 
161,117 


165,585 






66,289 


28,891 




523,626 


499,530 


24.096 


76.684 


962 


327.263 


8.409 


18.205 


14,150 


77,378 


575 


Frostburg . . 


1,505,445 


1.138,949 


366.496 


152.310 


4,691 


762.688 


118.703 


20.258 


191.951 


203,693 


51,151 


Salisbury . . . 


712,155 


577,123 


135,032 


94,068 




344.752 


42,491 


16.885 


61,919 


121,418 


30,622 


Towson .... 


2,135,419 


1,716,573 


418.846 


238,844 


11,133 


1,132.239 


166,714 


57,470 


186,653 


288,020 


54.346 



* Current year cash disbursements and encumbrances less budget credits. 



I 

III 

idi TABLE 126 — Inventories of Maryland State Department of Education, Teachers* Retirement 

System, and State Teachers Colleges: June 30, 1963 



Department or College 


Total 


Land and 
Improvements 


Buildings 


Equipment 


Total 


$22,847,708 

227,281 

29,445 

3,840.672 
2.777,177 
5,692,768 
3.742,282 
6,538,083 


$2,956,232 


$16,744,120 


$3,147,356 

227,281 

29,445 

367,902 
350,035 
640, 976 
480,044 
1,051,673 


State Department of Education 


Teachers' Retirement System 






State Teachers College. Bowie 

State Teachers College, Frostburg 

State Teachers College, Towson 


437,507 
540,071 
865.224 
412,218 
701,212 


3,035,263 
1,887,071 
4,186,568 
2,850,020 
4,785.198 



Maryland State Department of Education 



255 



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256 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 128— Vocational Rehabilitation Services Rendered: State of Maryland : 
Year Ending June 30, 19G3 





Total 




Being 




Being 


Surveyed : 


Closed: 


Local Unit 


Number 


Rehabili- 


Followed 


Training 


Prepared 


Under Ad- 


Other 




Cases 


tated 


on Jobs 


Completed 


for Jobs 


visement 


Service s 





6, 442 


1, 722 


193 


708 


1, 484 


1, 367 


968 




142 


49 




OA 

24 


44 


16 


9 




382 


102 


14 


30 


103 


92 


41 


Baltimore City .... 


2, 541 


688 


73 


280 


551 


512 


437 


Baltimore 


644 


136 


18 


46 


163 


128 


153 


Calvert 


50 


16 


. 


1 


11 


17 


5 




44 


6 




5 


11 


9 


13 


Carroll 


176 


51 


' 'i 


13 


28 


46 


31 


Cecil 


106 


39 


1 


19 


19 


17 


11 


Charles 


83 


22 


4 


6 


20 


23 


8 


Dorchester 


92 


19 




16 


17 


23 


17 


Frederick 


227 


111 


6 


9 




49 


13 


Garrett 


49 


12 




8 


13 


13 


3 


Harford 


82 


30 




8 


■•7 


19 


8 


Howard 


55 


9 




1 


... .2 


14 


11 


Kent 


29 


9 




4 


9 


5 


2 


Montgomery 


466 


104 


11 


79 


117 


123 


32 


Prince George's .... 


403 


91 


2 


32 


124 


106 


48 


Queen Anne's 


21 


6 




2 


6 


2 


5 


St. Mary's 


92 


26 


" 4 


5 


19 


25 


13 


Somerset 


66 


10 


5 


7 


17 


11 


16 


Talbot 


60 


22 




6 


11 


13 


8 


Washington 


400 


90 


'26 


70 


91 


80 


, fx 


Wicomico 


183 


58 


16 


30 


30 


18 




Worcester 


49 


16 


4 


7 


12 


6 


1 ' 



PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CLIENTS SERVED 



Characteristic 


Rehabili- 


Othert 


Total 


Characteristics 


Rehabili- 


Other 


Total 




tated* 








tated* 








6,442 



1,747 
1,244 
1, 324 
662 
608 
422 
290 
103 
31 
11 



81 
342 
968 
127 
375 
199 
158 
192 



3,963 
772 
492 
452 
278 
209 
276 



Race 

White 

Negro 

Other 

Sex 

Male 

Female 

Marital Status 

Single 

Married 

Other 

Employment History 
(at Survey) 

Employed 

Unemployed . . . 
Never worked 
Worked at 
some time . . 

Number on Welfare 
(at Survey) 



1,261 
457 
4 



1,055 
667 



660 
753 
309 



196 
1,526 
320 

1,206 



212 



3,250 
1,461 



3,206 
1, 514 



1,624 
2,282 
814 



238 
4,482 
1,060 

3,422 



541 



4, 511 
1,918 
13 



4,261 
2,181 



2,284 
3,035 
1,123 



434 
6,008 
1,380 

4.628 



753 



Clients who were rehabilitated into employment during year (1, 722). 
Clients who were still receiving service at end of year (4, 720). 



Maryland State Department of Education 



257 



TABLE 129— Cost of Vocational Rehabilitation Case Services Rendered: 
State of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1963 



Type of Service 


Number of 


Average 


Total 




Clients 


Cost 


Expenditure 


T'/^TAT VPT? VFITTTTT? 


7 968 






Diagnosis 








Medical 


2,380 


$21. 15 


50, 344 




95 


51 . 67 


4 909 




353 


45 86 


16* 189 


r 


207 


1 1 n IS 


22 807 


ourgery and ireatnient 










1 74. 


QS 97 


6 660 


Psychiatric 


41 


221.41 


9;078 


Surgical 


220 


153.27 


33, 720 


Dental 




lOD. DU 


23 020 






yo . oO 


Q 7Q7 

y , lot 


Jrrostnetic Appliances 










184 


QQn fin 


60 867 


Braces. • • • ■ 


102 


60 69 


6 190 




62 




12 910 




162 


OK). 1^ 


4 928 




14.8 


dQ so 

oy . oy 


1 n Q4ii 




20 


94.40 


1,888 


Hospitalization and Convalescent Care 








Hospitalization 


335 


374. 15 


125, 339 


Convalescent home care 


3 


236.00 


708 


Nursing care 


11 


115.00 


1,265 


Training and Training Materials 








Personal adjustment training. 


119 


142.23 


16,926 


Educational institutions 


885 


267.33 


236, 586 


Employment 


19 


199.63 


3,793 




31 


101.81 


3, 156 


Tutorial 


88 


89.01 


7,833 


Training materials 


432 


37.99 


16.412 


Maintenance and Transportation 








Alaintenance 










571 


234.25 


133,759 


Medical or phvsical restoration 


25 


68.32 


1,708 




69 


45.22 


3, 120 




17 


99.29 


1,688 


Transportation 










562 


57.09 


32,085 


Medical or physical restoration 


135 


16.06 


2, 168 




97 


12. 14 


1, 178 


Occupational Tools and Equipment (Clients) ........ 


175 


75.79 


13,264 



258 



lift 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 

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Capital 
Expendi- 
tures for 
Buildings 
and Land 


1 ; : 
i - 


366,514 
128,413 
2,386 

61 022 
2', 498 

6,668 
60,693 


: is 




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»188,734 
40 


66,824 

9,083 

9,168 
1,691 

9,083 
3,401 

9,152 


5,008 
3,919 
9,083 


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23,636 
76,788 
36,930 
15,592 


1 


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1 
1 
1 


Amount 
per Capita 


2 sasgs SSSSS 2§SSS ??b§ss sssss 


i 


s giSSs ssiii iSilS issli sliii 

^- f^^^^ c^'c^''^' ^-foo-^'o s'^'af-"' 


1 


§ iiigi SliiS igi^i gi^ii 

^£ ss^'s-' ss^'s^'- ^Bd^ 


1 


1 iiSil Siiii iiiis i iS^i 

2 ^^p.^ -^"tSS- J2-2^'- ii'-'s 


7,121 
21,438 
15,205 

7,832 


Federal 


$117,282 

2,000 
6,758 


;si igiii iiiii i 




1 


2 iiiii iisii g^iSi ^iSii 
1 ^"gil^- ^-s'?'^'^" ss'^i^'^i l^l'if^' 

5 



I 



{ iii ill 



M 11 ill 



Maryland State Department of Education 



259 



a-, 5<=> 



I" 

O 3 



.H3 S 
Q 



■ r- ■ • 00 <-< • .— . c 



I ^ ^ irs O 



I O 'T 



O O 00 "5 



lO cc CO 



»C 0» (M CC O 

g 



^CCt^CI^^-^>-igCO0O 



• c: -r t-. . 



C<J00«OC3»-i^<M00 

o t — f-roco 



(M r- O ^ c 



»0 O C5 

C» (M CO 












$408 
21.355 
585,287 
4,767 


194 
207,241 
6,476 

81, '690 


• OO • 

:§ : 

CO 
00 


73,834 
12,053 
12.333 
10, 164 
212 


872 
278 
120,773 


21,342 



<M U5 CO 00 
05 -rf" OO 
00 CO CO 

lO o oo'oo 



i« 00 CO 



1 CO O CO (M 00 C5 <M "5 OO »0 CO m »o 

^(MOCt^^t^^->r — OCOOO COO-rr — (MOC^CO 

C0<M»0C0t^OO^00O05-^ «l0^>-iC^00O«0 

t~ <M O 'J' lO t-^ O OO »-< — 1 ^ CO M 

_ . — »OOOlO'NIOC<l>«CO 



O O CO »o 

o o o 

05 (M CO O 



lO 02 Cfl lO < 



J O t>. OO CO 'J' CO IM 

ocococicr^-^^ — cot-cs 

lO'^OO-^OOOCCl-^OOOOlO 



(M C<I O O 00 



rocot~-cocooococ:c;cocoo 

CvlrtCl^OO LOCO^t^OOO 



O 00 »« C<l < 



o o c 
o o o> o 
cr> CO CO CO 

00 ci''*' 05 
lO t-- 1-^ 



CO • 1 



I CO • o o < 



t-.^.-i.-HcO'-iTr'*' 

•^"oO C<r>« CO CO OO 



CO OO CO CO »0 35 lO 



■ t--. t— CO • c; 

■ -f^ to ■ tnco 
■o— -coo 



• O 00 

co"-:r 



CO —I CO r-l 



• o o >« 



t^CO o 



c o m lo lO o ic 

O O CO C5 o o o 
O O CO CO 



O 00 C-5 

CO en CO 

«5 CO 00 CO 



00 CO CO 



t^OCD-^lOOCOCO 
COClOOOOt^OOO 
t^-OOJlOcOCOCOCO 

r-T t-^ CO CO oc" Tj<" CO -rr 
coiomo — t^o~ 

OCOU5U?— i>Ot>-00 



03 03 CO O Ci CO CO 
O O O U5 ^ CO CO 



I O C5 0»'<*< 



05 >o CO coo 00 
OO »o 



03 i2 
^ S c«.> t3 



5 = 3 



!1 



•<;<tdeL,_ K Ph fcL< •-9 < M < ^ C oj > M cc ai CO c« H M S 



260 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
Maryland State Department of Education: Headquarters and Vocational 
Rehabilitation: Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1963 



Source or Purpose 


Headquarters 


Vocational 
Rehabilitation 


RECEIPTS 


Balance Forwarded from 1961-62 

General Fund Appropriation 

Federal Fund Appropriation 

Appropriation Cancellations 


$21,305 
1,027,727 
4,814 
190, 186 
t(51,707) 
2,388 
59, 851 
76,444 


$*34, 909 
657,090 

1, 169,670 
t(41,756) 
8,099 


Nonbudgeted Receipts 




220 




$1,331,008 


$1,828,232 



DISBURSEMENTS 



Salaries 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communication 

Travel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and Maintenance 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 

Fixed Charges 

Total 



Salaries 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communication 

Travel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and Maintenance . 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 

Fixed Charges 

Total 

Salaries 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communication 

Travel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and Maintenance 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 

Total 



Salaries 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communication 

Travel 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Additional 

Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 
Fixed Charges 

Total 



Departmental 
AND Financial 
Administration 
$314, 116 
24, 876 
9,865 
13, 129 
3,612 
28,037 
8, 197 

2, 809 
8, 523 

968 

3, 750 



§143,059 
17,227 
5,281 
4, 892 
1,325 
4, 855 
4,267 
134 
3,402 



$184,442 

Library 
Extension 
Services 



$79, 893 



$79,893 



Administration 

$60,924 
5, 196 
1,688 
3,274 
468 
3,305 
1,431 

2, 178 
1, 168 

3, 155 
449 



$417,882 


$83,236 


Supervisory and 


Placement 


Consultative 


and 


Services 


Guidance 


$342,264 


$413,332 


34,805 


12,235 


11,730 


16, 034 


23,238 


22, 101 


5,034 


1, 889 


15,257 


18, 822 


14,033 


6,672 


2,794 


799 


7,436 


16,952 


18, 130 


20,010 


1, 200 


28,829 


$475,921 


$557,675 


Administrative 


Case 


Services 


Services 



$883,947 



$883,947 

Disability 
Determination 
(OASI) 
$95,315 
134,727 
2, 565 
3,950 
171 
1,989 
423 
7,415 
6,300 



$252,855 



Maryland State Department of Education 261 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT— (Continued) 

Maryland State Department of Education: Headquarters and Vocational 
Rehabilitation: Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1963 



Source or Purpose 


Headquarters 


Vocational 
Rehabilitation 


disbursements 


Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 

Total Program Expenditures 

Other Expenditures 


$1, 158, 138 
50,238 


Specialized 
Facilities for 
THE Blind 
$3, 792 

$1,781, 505 


Total Disbursements 

Unexpended Balance Returned to Treasury . . 
Balance, June 30, 1963 




$1,208,376 
$73, 834 
$48,798 


$1,781, 505 
$12,053 
$34,674 



* Excludes $2, 148 reported June 30, 1962. 
t Denotes red figure. 



FINANCIAL REPORT 

Maryland State Department of Education: Maryland State Teachers College Loans to 
Students— Title II, National Defense Education Act: Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1963 



Source or Purpose 


Bowie 


COPPIN 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


TOWSON 


RECEIPTS 


Balance, July 1, 1962 

Receipts: 

State Funds 

Federal Funds 

Total 


$8,030 

959 
8,624 


$1,206 

1,385 
11, 600 


$3,418 

1, 701 
11,250 


$425 

1,099 
8,352 


$3,629 

3,838 
27, 582 


$17,613 


$14, 191 


$16,369 


$9,876 


$35, 049 


DISBURSEMENTS 


Loans to Students 

Balance, June 30, 1963 


$16,304 
$1,309 


$13,055 
$1, 136 


$13, 500 
$2, 869 


$9,350 
$526 


$27, 100 
$7,949 



262 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 

Construction Accounts at Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 



Source or Purpose 



Bowie 



Balance, 
July 1, 
1962 



Addi- 
tional 
Available 



Dis- 
bursed 



Balance, 
June 30, 
1963 



COPPIN 



Balance, 
July 1, 
1962 



Addi- 
tional 
Available 



Dis- 
bursed 



Balance, 
June 30, 
1963 



1 General Construction Loan of 1955: 

2 Purchase of additional land 

3 General Construction Loan of 1957: 

4 Site improvement, including roads 

5 Refurbishing exterior of Newell Hall 

6 Construction of auditorium-gymnasium. . 

7 Site improvement and utilities 

8 General Construction Loan of 1958: 

9 Acquisition of land and properties 

10 Land 

11 Equipment for new library 

12 Equipment for new laboratory school 

13 Site improvement 

14 General Construction Loan of 1959: 

15 Replacing of existing boilers 

16 Construction of laboratory school 

17 Construction of dining hall 

18 Site improvement 

19 Construction of library 

20 General Construction Loan of 1960: 

21 Improvements to athletic field 

22 Equipment — dining hall and student 

activities building 

23 Construction of women's residence hall . . . 

24 Construction of roads, walls, parking areas 

25 Extend electrical distribution system .... 

26 Plans and specifications for add'l dining hall 

27 Survey and plans for add'l athletic field. . . 

28 Equipment for new library 

29 Construction of laboratory school 

30 Grading of athletic area ... 

31 General Construction Loan of 1961: 

32 Rewiring main building and electrical dis- 

tribution system 

33 Construction of laboratory school space 

into college classrooms 

34 Equipment for college classrooms 

35 Construction— dining hall into infirmary . . 

36 Equipment for infirmary 

37 Replacement of heat and water lines — 

Frost and Allegany halls 

38 Equipment for women's dormitory (120 

beds) 

39 Acquisition of land for new library 

40 Preliminary plans and specifications for 

new library 

41 Improvement elect, system in main bldg. 

including fire alarm system 

42 Expansion of campus lighting 

43 Replacement of heat and water lines in 

main building 

44 Installation of new boilers 

45 Construction of president's residence 

46 Construction of new infirmary and health 

center 

48 General Construction Loan of 1961 (contd.): 

49 Acquisition of additional land 

50 Remodeling of old laboratory school 

51 Laboratory school utility lines connect to 

city sewer 

52 Equipment for new laboratory school 

53 Land purchase along Warwick Avenue .... 

54 Construction 2nd floor of Connor hall 



$3,827 



1,891 



2,142 



32,987 



37,629 
8,200 



$2 



197 



1,891 



»2,142 



28,159 



36,362 
2,443 



$32,586 
565 



1,685 



'$32,586 
*565 



$1,630 



$1,685 



2,400 



2,400 



207 
34,361 
23,731 



*207 
*34,361 
17,892 



5,839 



1,267 
5,757 



31,832 
9,345 
10,016 
40,000 



*31,832 
5,322 
3,787 

39,527 



4,023 
6,229 
473 



Maryland State Department of Education 



263 



Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1963 





Frostbitrg 


Salisburt 


Towson 




Balance, 
Julv 1, 
1962 


Addi- 

tional 
Available 


Dis- 
bursed 


Balance, 
June 30, 
1963 


Balance, 
July 1, 
1962 


Addi- 
tional 
Available 


Dis- 
bursed 


Balance, 
June 30, 
1963 


Balance, 
July 1, 
1962 


Addi- 
tional 
Available 


Dis- 
bursed 


Balance, 
June 30, 
1963 


1 

2 










•51,591 




*$1,591 












'J, 
4 
5 
G 


$312 




*$312 












$i23 




*$i23 




8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 


341677 




33;642 


$l!635 










16," 876 
1,663 




16," 735 
*1,663 


$141 


14 
15 

17 
IS 

V.) 


6,035 
5,807 




4,"7i5 
*2,970 


1,'326 
2,837 


"'si 




"*3i 




12,949 




*12,949 




2:) 


























23 
24 
25 
2(3 

2S 

29 

,,1 

:,4 
.5 


3,544 
26,158 

.... 

8i,'i66 

11,700 




2,038 
*26, 158 

♦81,'i66 
*11,700 


1,506 


ll,'75i 




♦11, '75! 




3,9i6 
352 
1,995 




*3,9i6 
352 


1.995 


;,) 


24,654 




24,654 




















1,113 
49,000 




668 
49,000 


445 


















la 

41 

42 
43 

44 
45 
46 
47 


3,304 

:::: 






3,304 




14,155 
4 729 

28,050 
118,050 
41 




12,992 

28,050 
94,252 
*41 


1,163 
4 729 

23; 798 


114,369 




114,119 


2.50 


4S 
49 
50 
51 


















200,000 
198 




1,834 
•198 


198.166 


52 
53 
54 



























264 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



Construction Accounts at Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 



Bowie 



COPPIN 



SOUHCE OF PCRPOSS 


Balance, 


Addi- 




Balance, 


Balance, 


Addi- 




Balance, 




July 1, 


tional 


Dis- 


June 30, 


July 1, 


tional 


Dis- 


June 30. 




1962 


Available 


bursed 


1963 


1962 


Available 


bursed 


1963 



55 Equipment for 2nd floor of Connor hall. . . 

56 Completion of athletic area on west campus 



General Construction Loan of 1962: 

Preliminary plans for dining hall and stu- 
dent union building 

Site improvements, grading, drainage, 
roads, curbs, and walks 

Construction of staff house 

Supplementary appropriation for remodel- 
ing old laboratory school 

Construction of a women's dormitory 

Site improvement for women's dormitory. . 

Preliminary plans for new science building . 

Construction of new library 

Site improvement for new library 

Final stage development of lower athletic 
field 

Acquisition of land 

Construction of new infirmary 

Remodeling of old dining hall 

Equipment for infirmary 

Acquisition of land and improvements 

Construction of women's dormitory 

Preliminary plans for dining hall and stu- 
dent union building 

Construction of maintenance building . . . . . 

Site improvement for maintenance building 

Final stage construction of athletic fields. . , 

Equipment for new infirmary 

Renovation of old art department for 
science instruction 

Equipment for science instruction 

Construction of addition to dining hall 
and kitchen 

Construction of additional athletic field . . . 

Acquisition of land 

Construction of women's dormitory 

Preliminary plans for men's new residence 
hall. 

Preliminary plans for new science building 

Preliminary plans for new gymnasium . . . 

Construction of new road to laboratory 
school 

Engineering 

Preliminary plans additional dining hall 
and student union 

Renovation first floor of Connor Hall 

Construction of sidewalk and campus 
planting 

Construction of athletic field 



TOTAL. 



$8,000 



56,000 
90,000 



$86,676 



S3, 030 
39,956 



S154,000 $116,180 



$4,970 



16,044 
90,000 



$5,000 
25,000 



$124,496 



$216,728 



$2,522 
6,434 



3,000 
55,000 



9,300 
36,400 



$103,700 



$2,478 
18,566 



971 
6,600 



4,091 
15,565 



$204,662 



2,029 
48,400 



5,209 
20,835 



$115, 7( 



♦Includes the following amounts reverted: line 2— $247; 4— $131; 5— $8; 6-$25,705; 7— $565; 13— $15; 15-$164; 16—11,264; 18— 
Frostburg, $2,370; Salisbury, $31; 21— $2,142; 23— $12,136; 24— $5,112; 25— $3,246; 28— $109; 29— $24; 35— $81,100; 36-$ll,700; 
45— $41; 50— $20; 51-83,697; 70— $1; 79-$18,000; total— $167,828. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



265 



(Continued)— Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1963 





Frostburg 




i 


Salisbury 




T0W30.V 




Balance, 
July 1. 
1962 


Addi- 
tional 
Available 


Dis- 
bursed 


Balance, 
.June 30, 
1963 


Balance. 
July 1. 
1962 


Addi- 
tional 
Available 


Dis- 
bursed 


Balance. 
June 30. 
1963 


Balance, 
July 1, 
1962 


Addi- 
tional 
Available 


Dis- 
bursed 


Balance, 
June 30. 
1963 


55 
56 


























57 
58 


























59 


























60 
61 

62 
63 
64 
65 
66 




$28,000 
440,000 

25,000 
5,000 
650,000 

50,000 


$14,751 
13,224 

3,' 458 
1,156 


$13,249 
426,776 

25,000 
1,542 
648,844 

50.000 


















67 

68 
69 
70 
71 
72 
73 
74 

75 
76 
77 
78 
79 

80 
81 

82 
83 
84 
85 

86 
87 
88 




85,000 
160,000 
90,000 
7,000 
11.700 


2,' 634 
*6,'923 


85.000 
157,366 
90,000 
77 

11.700 




$152^566 
390,000 


$152,500 
11.117 


$378 ,'883 




















6,000 
65.000 

5,000 
75,000 


5,357 
535 


643 
64 465 
5! 000 
75,000 




$9,' 800 


$9; 367 


$433 




















18.000 
5! 700 

600.000 
174.000 
250,000 
525,000 

9.000 
5.000 
5.000 


*18.000 
4!716 

2,938 

6,' 635 

1,460 
5,000 
3,420 


'984 

597.062 
174,000 
250,000 
518,365 

7,540 

1^580 


89 
90 




















100,000 
5,000 


2,412 
4,912 


97,588 
88 


91 
92 


























93 


























94 


$247,404 


$1,551,700 


$282,407 


$1,516,697 


$178,398 


$693,500 


$318,217 


$553,681 


$352,435 


$1,706,500 


$210,743 


$1,848,192 



266 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
Maryland State Teachers Colleges: Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1963 



Source or Purpose Bowie 

i 


COPPIN 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


TOWSON 


receipts 


Balance Forwarded from 

1961-62 

General Fund Appropriation . . . 
Special Fund Appropriation. . . . 
Appropriation Cancellation .... 

Budget Credits 

Nonbudgeted Receipts 

Net Transfers 

Total Funds Available. . 


$5, 538 
556,906 
127, 777 
*(22, 509) 
2,788 
10, 572 
2, 175 


S3, 025 
506, 594 
24, 556 
1.971 
724 
27, 428 
3, 100 


$20,319 
1, 118,385 
375,010 
*(2,541) 
6, 801 
76,342 
20, 776 


$14,707 
574,370 
154, 554 
*(109) 
5,870 
36,974 
3, 625 


$45,866 
1,706,603 
428, 850 
*(7, 897) 
9,407 
134,239 
10,248 


$683,247 


$567,398 


$1,615,092 


$789,991 


$2,327,316 



DISBURSEMENTS 



ijeneral Administration 












Salaries and Wages 


$71,473 


$63,379 


$122,400 


$80, 510 


$201,920 


Technical and Special Fees . . 


431 


1,733 


910 


598 


4, 120 


Communications 


3,333 


3,269 


10, 962 


3,378 


15,952 


Travel 


327 


520 


1,058 


593 


1,685 


M^otor Vehicle Operation 












1 002 


752 


OUo 


zyo 




^, oXD 


9 flQ7 


fi (\A 8 


Q 1 QQ 

o, lyy 


o, ooU 




J., t^yj 


1 703 


5 067 


1 OCvA 


1 o at;c; 


EQuipment~Rt*placement .... 


594 


1. 935 


367 


988 


1 894 






577 


8 710 




1 1 /( 8 
1, 14o 


Grants, Subsidies, and 












887 


1 321 


1 624 


1 045 


3 284 




412 


' 396 


l! 561 


l' 019 


l' 757 


Total 


$82,216 


$77,932 


$161,459 


$93,452 


$251,240 


Instruction . . . 














$247 853 


$280, 831 


$684, 542 


$336 354 


$1 076 556 


Technical and Special Fees. . 




10 607 


52 310 


1 fi' 4.00 

ID, lyjy 


1 1 fi fii 








y oo 


9on 


9 1 (\R 




Q99 


1 QQ^ 

J., yyo 


3 746 




fi /I QQ 


Motor Vehicle Operation 














4 768 




2 698 


812 


Q Q41 






1, /yo 


( , Uy J. 


2, 409 


10, 598 


Supplies and Materials 


Q Q9Q 
O, O^O 


19 1 UK 




y, UOD 


OA 10^ 

Z4, loo 


Equipment-Replacement. . . . 


O'kU 




2 735 


1 KA^ 

1, 04 i 


O, OZD 




y, yofi 


9R nsQ 
^o, uoy 


72 822 


18 429 


oy, <oy 


Total 


$279, 625 


$335, 505 


$853, 683 


$386,783 


$1,305, 128 


Dietary Services 














$4Z, lb / 


CI /I 9'79 


C71 K'id. 
$ / 1, OoO 


CQK OQQ 
$O0, Uoo 


CI 1 '7 QfC? 
511 ( , OO / 


Technical and Special rees. . 


598 


1, 227 


7, 321 


1, 193 


2, 597 




53, 130 


14, 530 


131, 530 


41, 445 




Motor Vehicle Operation 






















1 OQ 
Loo 


Contractual Services 


OCT 
£.0 ( 


1 91 Q 




9 CI 1 
Z, Dll 


3, 280 


Supplies and Materials 


3, 518 


1,007 


5,' 622 


2,290 


3,495 


Equipment-Replacement .... 






2,454 


526 






.... 










coo nf\f\ 


JiO^S, <}04 


CO 1 Q A CQ 


CQQ OQB 

iSoo, Uyo 


$255,040 


Plant Operation and 












Maintenance 












Salaries and Wages 


o 1 A*? no 1 


C/1Q 9on 
<s>4y, ^yu 


CI HA K 
<3iJ.0D, Kilo 


CO!^ OQA 


C99/t QAO 
$ZZ4, o4Z 


Technical and Special Fees. . 


331 


413 


760 




2, 126 


Fuel 


23,478 


6,341 


12, 017 


17,"i89 


29,026 


Motor Vehicle Operation 












1. 556 


110 


1, 165 


655 


2,288 


Contractual Services 


42, 531 


17, 797 


59,666 


47, 189 


55, 580 


Supplies and Materials 


7,287 


3,629 


15, 759 


5,829 


26, 155 


Equipment-Replacement .... 


4,993 




424 


4,299 


3,016 


Equipment-Additional 


1,705 


'Z44 


11,887 


81 


2, 583 


Total 


$189, 602 


$78, 324 


$258,323 


$160, 536 


$345, 616 


Total Program Expenditures. . . 


$651, 143 


$524, 115 


$1,491,928 


$723, 869 


$2, 157,024 


Refunds 


983 


65 


5,208 


2,756 


10, 895 


Acti\dties Association 


5, 540 


9,278 


33,002 


12,920 


28,287 


Athletic Association 


3, 673 


3,465 


26,490 


10, 130 


28,207 


Application Fees 


1,265 


2, 691 


1,940 


28,215 


Other Expenditures 




6, 855 


799 




681 


Clearing Account for Payrolls. . 




1,319 


8, 152 


8," 584 


34,079 


Total Disbursements. . . . 


$661,339 


$546, 362 


$1, 568,270 


$760, 199 


$2,287,388 


Unexpended Balance Re- 










$3,388 


turned to Treasury. . . 


$12,994 


$12, 595 


$6,405 


$20,285 


Balance, June 30, 1963. . 


$8,914 


$8,441 


$40,417 


$9,507 


$36, 540 



* Denotes red figure. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



LIST OF FINANCIAL SUMMARY TABLES 



Number 
VIII 


Title 

Receipts from the State of Maryland 


Page 
281 


IX 




282 


X 


Receipts from All Sources 


283 


XI 




284-285 


XII 


Disbursements for Instruction 


286-287 


XIII 


Disbursements for Pupil Personnel and Health Services... 


288 


XIV 


Disbursements for Operation and Maintenance of Plant... 


289 


XV 
XVI 


Disbursements for Pupil Transportation 

Disbursements for Administration and Fixed Charges 


290 
291 


XVII 
XVIII 


Disbursements for Food Services, Student Body 
Disbursements for Community College Current Expenses. 


292 

293 


XIX 




294 


XX 




295 



Maryland State Department of Education 



281 



Community 
College 
Building 
Grant 




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Incentive 
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Buildings 


S isSii iggss s|g|| s|BS5 gngg 
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System 


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Community 
Colleges 


$787,711 

19,224 
38,937 
227,447 
90,283 

18,'i74 

18,060 
35,' 586 

240,984 
51,713 

47 ,"303 


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Adult 
Education 


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Drivers 


i lis :S gii is SSSSS II : :| S :|| 


Part 
Payment 
of Officials' 
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tion Aid 


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g ""r — - - r 


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s ii§ig ssSai iliis iisii Ilii 

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Aid per 
Classroom 
Unit 


s ii^ii iiiii mmi isig§ iisi 

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III 


$116,530,457 

3,818,425 
9,581.472 
23.381,936 
13,409,807 
1,411.902 

1,431,075 
2,385.572 
2,510,740 
2,237,887 
1.525,664 

3.248,996 
1,482.449 
4,207,423 
1,731,943 
833,195 

14,956,119 
15,660,253 
1,010,138 
1,605.195 
1,390,786 

882,281 
4.259,563 
2,391,376 
1.176,260 


Local Unit 


Baltimore City 

Baltimore 

Carroll 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Cjueen Anne's 

St. Marys 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



282 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



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284 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE XI — Disbursements for All Purposes: Maryland Local Boards of Education: 











Outgoing Transfers 




















Total 






Total 


Interest 


Capital 








Current 




Local Unit 


Disburse- 


for Debt 


Outlay* 


To Other 


Tuition — 


School 


Expense 


Instruction 




ments 


Service* 


School 


Handicapped 


Lunch and 


Disburse- 












Units 


Children 


Special Milk 


ments 




Total State 


§374,812,272 


$14,310,692 


173,722,185 


$225,390 


$595,738 


$3,115,294 


$282,842,973 


$201,942,169 


Allegany 


6,772,880 


123,878 


283,272 




1,200 


111.965 


6,252,565 


4,365,387 


Anne Arundel 


23,085,023 


1,308,816 


3,670,702 


'84 


4,920 


270,076 


17,830,425 


13,127,345 


Baltimore City. . . 


87,764,712 


2,855,657 


14,554,604 




183,245 


443,681 


69,727,525 


50,522,774 


Baltimore 


64,561,983 


3,347,286 


17,699,593 


613 


56,640 


532,450 


42,925,401 


30,935,943 


Calvert 


2,180,176 


99,356 


97,236 


16 


600 


19,560 


1,963,408 


1,286,178 


Caroline 


2,544,600 


87,934 


485,653 


164 


1,020 


21,878 


1,947,951 


1,301,276 


Carroll 


4,854,742 


49,097 


361,895 


108 




59,456 


4,384,186 


3,168,340 


Cecil 


5,459,471 


211,280 


1,060,395 


tl,735 


1,200 


44,874 


4,139,987 


2,887,662 


Charles 


4,039,255. 


63,181 


502,118 






37,387 


3,436,569 


2,251,083 




2,977,087 


117,891 


406,816 


940 




25,333 


2,426,107 


1,562,415 


Frederick 


7,834,207 


357,819 


689,773 


1,508 


1,800 


81,668 


6,701,639 


4,722,245 


Garrett 


2,193,822 


41,351 


244,652 


15,866 




28,866 


1,863,087 


1,185,490 


Harford 


9,748,620 


368,519 


1,775,744 


560 


2,400 


91,492 


7,509,905 


5,090,604 


Howard 


4,659,275 


128,572 


890,591 


1,168 


2,550 


62,107 


3,574,287 


2,531,882 


Kent 


1,659,651 


33,504 


178.050 


28 


2,400 


16,124 


1,429,545 


1,001,165 


Montgomery 


67,384,488 


2,323,265 


15,017,743 


179,158 


201,480 


479,973 


49,182,869 


35,302,914 


Prince George's. . . 


51,436,653 


2,038,822 


13,742,750 


728 


123,390 


522,662 


35,008,301 


25,339,549 


Queen Anne's 


1,902,695 


40,218 


186,540 


1,338 


1,200 


22,013 


1,651,386 


1,115,497 


St. Mary's 


2,860,953 


35,088 


254,384 




2,400 


31,393 


2,537,688 


1,627,191 


Somerset 


1,796,198 


62,623 


30,030 


l,i72 




11,891 


1,690,482 


1,134,840 


Talbot 


1,780,978 


62,912 


57,616 


344 


2,220 


18,396 


1,639,490 


1,125,866 


Washington 


9,326,691 


307,240 


199,942 






111,911 


8,707,598 


6,007,089 


Wicomico 


5,478,993 


194,679 


1,098,449 


19,720 


6,600 


48,876 


4,110,669 


2,892,648 




2,509,119 


51,704 


233,637 


140 


473 


21,262 


2,201,903 


1,456,786 



* Includes disbursements for the community colleges. See TABLES XIX and XX for these amounts, 
t Includes transfer of $1,699 to Harford Junior College for tuition of Cecil County residents. 
t Includes Teachers' Retirement and Social Security paid direct by State. 

" Excludes Federal reimbursement for school lunch and special milk shown as an outgoing transfer in column 6. 
Note: Opening and closing balances and interfund transfers are no longer shown on this TABLE because of changes in method of re- 
porting. Redemption for Debt Service is also excluded here but is shown on TABLE XX. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



285 



Year Ending June 30, 1963 



Pupil 
Personnel 
Services 


Health 
Services 


Operation 
of Plant 
and Equip- 
ment 


Mainte- 
nance of 
Plant 


Pupil 
Trans- 
portation 


Adminis- 
tration 


Fixed 
Chargest 


Food 
Services" 


Student 
Body 
Activities 


Com- 
munity 
Services 


Com- 
munity 
Colleges 
Current 
Expense 


11,534,147 


$1,054,455 


$23,911,360 


$10,645,376 


$11,727,215 


$4,828,423 


$22,513,994 


$564,860 


$377,061 


$362,241 


$3,381,672 


41,206 
115,396 
125,663 
298,369 

10,263 


12,886 

588,639 
174,345 
261 


531,762 
1,243,515 
6,515,686 
4,101,128 

128,836 


218,864 
504,987 
2,438,981 
1,915,390 
64,754 


433,222 
1,069,196 

244,744 
1,500,546 

303,110 


64,505 
267,426 
1,082,151 
521,388 

41,133 


435,639 
1,287,497 
7,061,987 
2,906,315 

124,962 


34,600 
8,438 
122,856 
102,298 
3,911 


2,691 
13,002 
220, 128 
24,470 


14,388 
13,695 


111,803 
179,235 
803,916 
431,214 


11,673 
25,058 
28,484 
21,955 
11,030 


154 
141 

3,096 

570 


143,777 
252,478 
362,397 
239,866 
198,844 


66,529 
158,320 
124,201 

97,322 
143,303 


249,102 
415,373 
345,028 
373,927 
317,142 


31,803 
50,210 
80,976 
42,810 
39,916 


135,948 
275,327 
283,021 
204,354 
152,887 


2,038 
4,721 
10,417 
19,949 


5,651 
23,192 

9,669 


11,026 
14,705 
100,488 


75,i46 


40,834 
9,056 
38,033 
18,614 
11,045 


11,822 
26 

13,251 
23 
640 


509,754 
97,011 
504,742 
194,049 
89,916 


286,905 
59,511 
237,258 
127,100 
35,229 


443,657 
343,335 
827,084 
361,129 
157,544 


83, 157 
37,267 
155,129 
50,924 
32,669 


443,097 
118.852 
478,217 
243,442 
99,372 


58,697 
10,407 
9,900 
10,097 
865 


1,495 
13,668 


20,384 
637 

22,759 
1,100 


81,087 
155,687 


400, 845 
196,004 

7,806 
18.763 

9,815 


8,107 
192,440 
314 
113 


3,928,628 
3,126,135 
99,513 
203,553 
104,283 


1,606,257 
1,679,535 
54,567 
166,833 
65,007 


1,182,358 
978,657 
225,670 
303,844 
222,401 


1,513,621 
339,956 
38,422 
51,487 
26,829 


4,053,803 
2,710,541 
106,270 
147,854 
126,601 


20,294 
111,512 

13,876 
686 


56,258 
3.830 


119,037 
27,897 
3.327 
344 
20 


1,047,005 
249,817 


8,942 
48,044 
17,257 
19,992 


37,469 
10, 158 


116,780 
762,581 
308,390 
147,136 


60,417 
327,730 
136,769 

69,607 


177,303 
536, 101 
403,423 
312,929 


32.705 
149.768 
51,670 
42,501 


107.938 
577.626 
281.521 
150,923 


1,065 
10,378 
5,826 
2.029 


3,007 


8,384 
4,050 


246,762 



286 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



i 

i 
I 

i 



i 
1 





Other 
Charges 


S : :?2 : : : : : : : j:^ : : :S :2 : : : : : 

^ --Ci ^...^ -os-to 

■ ? 

&% 




id Materials 


1 


37,985 

3,916 
105 
4, 421 
2', 252 

"75 
79 

458 
5,177 
505 

4,161 
2,874 

'. 13' 788 
129 
45 




II 




1 


i 


u 


5 : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : :1b :: : : : : : 
^' ^- 


< 




Total 
Supplies 

and 
Materials 


42,659 

3,916 
105 
4,421 
2,252 

"75 
79 

'458 
5,177 
505 

4,161 
7.548 

13, '788 
129 
45 




iif 


i : ; ; ;i ; ; ; ; : ; ; ; : : ; ; : ; ; : : ; ; 








U 


i siisi iiiSi isssi isEis 




Total 
Adult 
Education 


s iiiSi ii2§§ iiiS^ giSis §Sig 

w vO ~ CO ^ OS w3 ^ ^ ' i>» io < 1 co co ifi 




II 


i ssiii isisi iiiss iig^i mi 

i "-"g'S"" gg:::::: 






1 


2 liSii iiiSS liiii isi§ 

g fe'ssgjs?' ^'sss'g s??s§2 j^ggg- 




1 


II 


^ Isiii Ssii^ gliSg iS^g 

S 2g|2§ -^i^SSd S2^'2- 1^'-^-' -^-g"^' 




1 

1 


a 


S iiilS iiSii gsSSi ilii2 isii 
g spjs i^i^^ s'2g^"^£ s'l^f^'s' gg"^'^' 


Total Inst 




*1 


s igii2 giiSi ggiii 

? gggi^' ^iM^ ^^m^ m^^^ 
^2 


ill 


:j...,849 

16,479 
3,704 
231 

21,033 
2,265 

7,532 

306 
5,920 

1, '270 
5,205 

52,238 
86,968 
1,000 
2,041 
7,224 

262 

2, 'i7i 




Salaries 
and Wages 


i liill iilii sllgi sSsIs isii 

1 ami Mm iuiii §§§1 
»i 'sss-- SIS--'" 




i 


i SiSiS ssiis siiis ssSsi iiig 

S isiii" §i§si HSiii iisii siis 

„s --ssg-- ss------ 


Local Unit 


otal State 

Allegany 

Baltimore City 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Frederick ' 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

Talbot 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Maryland State Department of Education 



1 

I 
i 

I 
1 





Other 
Charges 


g mim ami liiii gig^e si^s 

S ------ ^"---2 «S2- 

** 






J 


§ sSSSI is^ig ggiis gii^i ^ggs 

3 SggggJ ^^Z^^ g^^-"^ -f^^^ 




i 


Library 
Books 


1 siisi ^i^ii s^i^g ig^ii 

1 ojC^-g--^- «-^-ooc-o co.-c.-croi ggc.--.-^- o^--5-co- 


i 


i 


Text- 
books 


i Siiis isiii siiis [^ggii ess 

1 ?fg|^"2 2;SSS2 ^"-52- ||2g"2 2S?^'2 


1 






2 s^^Hi iligg g^ggi Bum 

1 gg^'^o 




Con- 
tracted 
Services 


128,472 

11,093 
3,704 

15,' 354 

'io6 

5,845 

544 
3,408 

6,284 
79,515 
500 
691 

142 
1,'286 




ill 


92,546,394 

2,266.707 
5,859,587 
22,286.417 
14,628,598 
554,894 

651,646 
1,695,899 
1,320,947 
834,457 
754,618 

2,294,412 
499.793 
2,291,195 

I, 188,739 
474,990 

16,174,046 

II. 707,918 
526,968 
764,095 
551,672 

520,007 
2,737,676 
1,278,500 

682,613 




Total 
Secondary 


98,944,648 

2,381,950 
6, 338, 644 
23,767,643 
15,440,520 
603,825 

697,963 
1,779,835 
1,407,280 
899,851 
800,717 

2,437.480 
530,951 
2,450,492 
1,275,852 
509,334 

17,319,788 
12,622,274 
559,989 
819,505 
584,846 

555,498 
3,071,689 
1,364,181 

724,541 




Other 
Charges 


s i^igi liiii §11^1 nm^n gisi 






i 


i iislg lilig gsggi ggggi g|2| 

1 fsg-^;'-' S?^:'S5"?f- g|2?^- 




d Materials 


Library 
Books 


i §iSii isiii ^aieg iSiii g'Sgi 

CO oTcgg^'-" d^'^^^^ 000.-0^- -S'f^" 




I 


II 


1,737,833 

26,793 
150,852 
*557,817 
231,881 
8,269 

11,189 
21,879 
26,142 
30.158 
11.304 

22,894 
8,283 
65,323 
28,070 
8,427 

149,619 
232,173 
6,300 
18,488 
12,038 

10,109 
60,101 
26,158 
13.566 


1 




*i 


i Si^SS iigi§ Sieig gills gsii 

11^-^-2 s^-g-^- 




ill 


s 

85,137 

5,386 

"23i 
5,679 
25 

7,532 

206 

75 

726 
1,797 

45,954 
7,453 
500 
1,350 
7,224 

120 

'885 




Pi 


1,235 

-.691 
i,..,,.j,939 
,24,707,740 
14,548,975 
647,822 

562,033 
1,332,156 
1,416,491 
1,251,685 

727,862 

2,168,585 
619,847 
2,447,491 

I, 188,412 
463,756 

17,213,875 

II, 843,029 
523,801 
749,189 
518,540 

536,835 
2,665,516 
1,428,009 

683,156 




lis 


§ sSsSs iSaci iiiii issli iiii 

i ami iisis" iiiii iiiii iiis" 


Local Unit 


Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore City 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Kent 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 



288 



Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 289 



li^ i § iiSii iiSii siSSi MWs Sill 
111 i =-"si"'" =SS2"§ |s2§s sss'"' 


Charges 


s iS5ll Sie :S aSiis is ill SiiS 


;e of Plant 


H 




Maintenanc 

Contracted 
Services 


s siSii isiii siiii sS isi siig 

D SSSS- g3SS= E-SS- S§ S2 2"S¥3 


H 


i ls§eS sHIii igisg iliSi Sill 

1 RSgSS" SSS-?! gSSsS S2S"=?S2 SSISS 


Total 
Mainte- 
nance 


s iisis iisgi isiii ggggi ggn 

1 isggs ggsis ssgs 




o 
O 


$211,756 

2,638 
1,484 
31,898 
75,719 
257 

1,351 
189 

2,'i46 

1,632 

757 

29,088 
64,125 

"96 

'i47 
329 




H 


s sisli mMm ii^is iisi 

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1 

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Utilities 


i iiS^i ^iiil iS^II 2Sgg| g^ii 
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n 


s i^iis riii iiigg iiiia liii 


1 


Total 
other 
Charges 


i SSi^B igsii Ssisi liiis SiSi 

d .-^'ggg .-.g.o g^... .-g-^o 

---- 


Operation c 

Supplies 

and 
Materials 


s i^i^i Ssg^i ^iiis iisS 

g s";;s^'- ^-sts^-s^ gssss -5:"s-2 


Contracted 
Services 


$172,608 
548 
101 '700 
27,885 

357 
"126 

1,703 
228 
1,174 

13,' 605 
'933 

1,938 
2. "389 


ill 


§ gfisi iiiii gsisi iHsii gisi 

i Siiis ms 


Total 
Operation 


1 i sSIBi Sslii RiSii iSsSi sils 
i iSSiS" S'siii isiss lisis 2giH 


Local Unit 


Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore City 

Baltimore I 

Cecil 

Dorchester 

Garrett 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



290 Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



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Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



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295 



TABLE XX— Disbursements for Debt Service: Maryland Public Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1963 







Long-term County Bonds 


State 


Loan 


i_jOCAL Unit 


1 otai ue DC 










Service 






■ 








T? p /I p m n f" 1 OTi 


All LCI cat 


■DA 

Jtvedemption 


Interest 


Total State 


$39, 161,008 


S16, 122, 314 


$11, 705,899 


$8,728,002 


$2, 604, 793 


Allegany 


586,790 


' 121,000 


41,269 


341,912 


82,609 


Anne Arundel 


3,441,263 


i 1,715,000 


1,261, 511 


417,447 


47, 305 


Baltimore City 


5,983,657 1 


i 3,128,000 


*2, 855, 657 






Baltimore 


8, 516, 329 


3,246,000 


2,620,346 


1,923,043 


726,940 


Calvert 


304,396 


1 Ti20,000 

1 


.76,457 


85,040 


22,899 




303, 786 


130,000 


74, 760 


85, 852 


13, 174 


Carroll 


349, 987 


1 100,000 


4, 500 


200, 890 


44, 597 


Cecil 


797, 097 


375, 000 


147,933 


210,817 


63,347 


Charles 


314, 696 


67,000 


24, 123 


184, 515 


39, 058 


Dorchester 


304, 799 


116,000 


109,656 


70,908 


8,235 


Frederick 


993,891 


1 305,000 


282, 575 


331,072 


75,244 


Garrett 


205, 494 


100,000 


22,438 


64, 143 


18.913 


Harford 


938, 598 


1 465,000 


358.965 


105,079 


9, 554 


Howard 


474, 648 


157,000 


56, 050 


189, 076 


72, 522 


Kent 


179,949 


75,000 


20,074 


71.445 


13,430 


Montgomery 


6,555,443 


2,160,314 


1,640,847 


2,071,864 


682,418 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


6, 100,471 


2.752,000 


1, 559, 584 


1. 309, 649 


479,238 


169,724 


50,000 


23,614 


79, 506 


16,604 


St. Mary's 


179,753 






144,665 


35,088 


Somerset 


163,925 


j 10, 000 


52, 875 


91, 302 


9, 748 


Talbot 


297, 065 


145,000 


56, 175 


89, 153 


6, 737 


Washington 


1, 070, 070 


! 395,000 


221,903 


367, 830 


85, 337 


Wicomico 


665, 836 


1 285,000 


170,475 


186, 157 


24,204 


Worcester 


263,341 


1 105,000 


24, 112 


106, 637 


27, 592 



* Includes $33, 834 for Community College debt service. 

t Includes $15, 000 redemption and $5, 550 interest on long-term current expense loan. 



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Poorest Park 

Western 

Frederick Douglass 

Mergenthaler 

Dunbar 

Junior High Schools. . . 
Gen. Voc. Schools 

Baltimore 

Catonsville Sr 

Milford Mill Sr 

Woodlawn Sr 

FranWin Sr 

Towson Sr 

Parkville Sr 

Dundalk Sr 

Overlea Sr 

Kenwood Sr 

Hereford Sr.-Jr 

Ridcley Jr-Dulaney Sr. 
Sollers Point Sr.-Jr.. . . 
Sparrows Point Sr.-Jr.. 

Catonsville Jr 

Johiinycake Jr 

Woodlawn Jr 

Sud brook Jr 

Franklin Jr 

Dumbarton Jr 

Loch Raven Jr 

Towsontown Jr 

Dundalk Jr 

Holabird Jr 

North Point Jr 

Arbutus Jr 

Golden Ring Jr 

Parkville Jr 

Stammers Run Jr 

Middle River Jr 



298 



Ninety-Seventh Ann'ual Report 



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Somerset.: 

WashinRton Sr.-Jr 

Marion Sr.-Jr 

Woodson Sr.-Jr 

Crisfield Sr.-Jr 

Deal Island Sr.-Jr 

Somerset Sr.-Jr 

Ewell Jr 


Talbot 

Easton Sr.-Jr 

Moton Sr.-Jr 

St. Michaels Sr.-Jr 

Washington 

Soutli HaKerstown Sr... 

Hancock Sr 

lioonsboro Sr 

North Hagerstown Sr. . 
Williamsport Sr.-Jr.. . . 

Clear Spring Sr.-Jr 

Smithsburg Sr.-Jr 
Hancock Int.-Jr 


Boonsboro Jr 

South Potomac Jr. 

North Potomac Jr 

Washington Jr 


Wicomico 

Wicomico Sr 

Mardela Sr.-Jr 

Pittsville Sr.-Jr 

Salisbury Sr.-Jr 

Wicomico Jr 

James M. Bennett Jr.. . 

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Pocomoke Sr.-Jr 

Snow Hill Sr.-Jr 

Stephen Decatur Sr.-Jr. 
Worcester Sr.-Jr 



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304 Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE XXII — Enrollment by Subject, Including Duplicates: 



Local Unit 


Total 


i 
1 


Social 




Mathe- 






— 


Enroll- 


English 


Studies 


Science 


matics 


Latin 


French 


Name of High School 


ment 














274 765 


335 179 


98"^ 949 


999 791 


994 840 
Zii4, 04y 


11 01,1 
il, U04 


50,491 




8 505 


11 566 


0, 000 


i , uuo 


c Q in 
0, o4U 


805 


755 


Olrltnwn ftr -Tr 


210 


293 


211 


17fi 
1(0 


100 






232 


310 


246 


214 


156 




'3i 


Fort Hill Sr.-Jr 


2,077 


2,856 


2,226 


1,723 


1,518 


222 




2 167 


2 914 


2 148 


1 700 


1, 040 


279 


109 




'831 


1 117 


' 855 


704 


t;07 
oy/ 


39 


181 


VqHpv f^r - Tr 


809 


1 008 


747 


DUO 


040 


107 


114 




587 


' 746 


573 


400 


111 

40/ 


• ■ • 


168 


Rooll - Tr 


999 


1 215 


976 


79R 


004 


158 


152 




239 


478 


518 


239 


9SQ 

zoy 






210 


343 


210 


910 


910 






T^oqII Flpm (7fh^ 


144 


286 


143 


153 


141 
i40 






A A 


20 079 


25 381 


21 043 


14 388 


1R OOli 
10, WO 


17Q 
0/0 


2,852 




2* 170 


2! 269 


2 139 


1436 


979 


1 17 
10 1 


410 




' 976 


982 


1 162 


795 


•il Q 

01 y 




153 




1 367 


1 524 


1 704 


1 ne? 


878 
0/9 


40 


365 


Q/MifViot-n ftr -Tr 


824 


837 


' 877 


004 


00/ 




186 




1, 767 


1 859 


1 944 


1 529 


1 318 


00 


ICR 
OoO 


Urr»r\L-Urn Po rl- '^r - Tr 


1 662 


2 023 


1' 765 


1 101 


1 233 


00 


209 




11893 


2', 681 


l!922 


l!352 


l',482 


85 


329 


Bates Sr.-Jr 


1,590 


1,830 


1,762 


1,244 


1,236 




187 




1 236 


2 029 


1 202 


oUo 


1 900 




100 




1 286 


1 753 


1' 234 


873 


1 234 




08 




1027 


1 530 


998 


658 


' 998 




111 




1^628 


2*277 


1 585 


1,009 


1 694 




1 >;4 

104 




1336 


1, 247 


1 496 


1 345 


1*345 




1 07 

ly / 




627 


1 192 


' 596 


596 


oyo 








391 


750 






00/ 






RonfolH Tr ^'7t^l^ 


299 


598 


299 




299 








yjo , oou 


73 596 


76 130 


60 407 


59 377 


9 980 


1 9 009 




1 831 


2 ' 584 


2 162 


1' 483 


1' 219 


oy 


9t;o 
zou 




2 474 


2 789 


1 982 


1 958 


1 437 


119 
10^ 


000 




2* 178 


2 491 


2 008 


1 049 
1 ,y4z 


9 744 
Z, /44 




097 

yz/ 




2 854 


3! 322 


3' 359 


2 183 


1 742 


977 
ill I 


SIO 




2,' 251 


2! 593 


l!968 


l',685 


1,'053 


28 


291 




2,228 


2,774 


1,804 


1,728 


1,121 


92 


617 




1 153 


1 254 


768 


871 


71 '\ 
1 10 


170 
0/U 


04/ 




3 210 


3' 666 


2 623 


2 505 


2 608 


289 


1 041 
1 , U41 




2* 432 


3 192 


2 360 




1 518 


47 
4/ 


OOo 




1 639 


2 022 


1' 599 


1 369 


1' 701 






1038 


1 324 


928 


yoo 


952 








2 125 


3 039 


2 043 


9 008 

z, uyo 


1 681 




llfi 
000 




37 161 


40 905 


50 511 


07 740 

0/ , |40 


39 297 


yyo 


7 94!; 
/ , Z40 




1,312 


1641 


2015 


1 781 


1* 589 








40, OUi 


R1 

Dl , oOi 


40, oyu 


77 099 


in Oli8 
oO, UOo 


1 40A 

1 . 4yo 


/? 401 

D, 4y 1 




1 624 


1 866 


1 855 


1 089 


yoy 


120 


904 


M;if/-...^1 Mill Sr 


l' 708 


1830 


1' 991 


1 201 


1 317 


136 


558 




2 160 


2*458 


2 485 


1 530 


1 179 


128 


447 






OvO 


822 


OZo 


187 

00/ 


1 
ly 


223 




1 802 


2 109 


1 987 


1 237 


1 337 


154 


638 


T>rt^t^-.-^H^ Qr 


2 020 


2 276 


2 263 


1 408 

1 , 4UO 


1 184 


84 
04 


447 






z, 000 


9 4t;i 

Z , 401 


1, OU/ 


1 1 40 

1 , i4y 


1 1 1 
111 


191 
OZo 




1 840 


2 069 


2 104 


1 1 70 

1, 1 /y 


Q47 

y4/ 


134 


241 


T ' , - ^ ,1 Q- 




z ,010 


9 71 9 

z, / Jiz 


1 , 00/ 


1 1 89 


149 
14i 


000 


Zl^w-^fr^fA Qr Tr 


1 151 


1 655 


1 200 


1 007 
1, uu/ 


908 




254 






1 838 


1 408 

1, 4yo 


J. , oOi 


1 282 


114 
104 


1(54 

004 




872 


1,407 


837 


822 


723 




112 


Sparrows Point Sr.-Jr 


2,286 


3,048 


2,323 


1,840 


1, 590 


45 


315 




1,312 


2,161 


1,288 


1,284 


1.282 


20 


177 




917 


1,499 


991 


899 


896 


6 


97 




1, 193 


1,998 


1,193 


1,193 


1. 193 


39 


147 




1,396 


2,260 


1,387 


1,388 


1,388 


18 


168 




1.203 


1,948 


1,172 


1,170 


1. 166 


25 


124 




1,021 


1,646 


995 


1,002 


1,002 


44 


186 




1,158 


1,941 


1, 124 


1,125 


1,129 


17 


71 




1,191 


2,074 


1.209 


1.191 


1.191 


87 


110 
160 




1,154 


1,840 


1,137 


1,135 


1.137 




1,386 


2,267 


1,366 


1,369 


1.366 




97 




1,294 


2.126 


1,272 


1,279 


1,268 




78 




1,539 


2,599 
2,060 


1,482 


1,516 


1.670 




80 




1,304 


1,283 


1.283 


1.284 




105 




1,501 


2.468 


1.472 


1,472 


1.475 


1 '33 


106 











Maryland State Department of Education 305 



Each Maryland Public High Schools: Fall of 1962 





Other 




Industrial Education 






Physical 




Art- 






Foreign 


Agri- 






Home 


Business 


and 




Arts 


Driver 


Spanish 


Lan- 


culture 






Eco- 


Education 


Health 


Music 


and 


Education 


guages 




Arts 


Vocational 


nomics 




Education 




Crafts 




17.210 


3,026 


3,937 


99,354 


14.492 


76, 166 


108,080 


260.998 


161,245 


103,945 


7,401 


378 


29 


37 


1,950 


430 


2,026 


3,354 


5.602 


5,817 


2,997 
86 


493 








72 




76 


79 


192 


212 








■37 


49 




91 


63 


187 


213 






i39 






486 


258 


603 


610 


1.416 


1,157 


7i2 


i62 


239 


»29 




382 


59 


337 


836 


1,074 


1,410 


414 


97 








241 


64 


208 


365 


771 


674 


372 


65 


'. '. '. 






215 




217 


592 


472 


475 


394 


53 








165 




138 


223 


405 


518 


301 


45 








236 


'49 


250 


586 


457 


574 


336 


71 
















254 


211 


239 










104 




106 




210 


230 




















164 


143 


i43 




593 


140 


67 


6.052 


233 


5.686 


6,894 


15.423 


10.451 


9,382 










431 


183 


394 


2,349 


880 


558 


320 




m 






146 




96 


752 


826 


169 


84 




205 






257 




158 


744 


666 


407 


151 










256 




231 


365 


523 


452 


225 




li4 






713 




841 


785 


1,037 


536 


631 






a5i 




590 




462 


717 


1 , 153 


655 


723 






"89 




543 




523 


778 


1,372 


774 


829 




114 






502 




555 


404 


994 


868 


463 










647 




589 




1,236 


1.273 


1,236 






1 


474 




384 




1,324 


1.056 


1,036 






... 1 


329 




348 




1,031 


658 


713 






::: i ::: 


537 




517 




1,666 


1,095 


1,089 
830 










627 




588 




1.324 


616 


















627 


700 


535 


















436 


290 


218 


















328 


344 


299 




3.968 


1.883 




34,668 


10,166 


21,711 


32,088 


73.623 


46.119 


27,554 




61 






1.462 




443 


2,069 


2,502 


1,452 


1,167 




192 


»103 i 


1,529 




817 


3.955 


2,720 


1.266 


940 






»346 




5,138 






1,695 








119 


"95 








1,323 


3.387 


3,219 


3.211 


916 




139 


"30 




l,i67 




849 


4,292 


2,626 


2,542 


364 




537 


»158 




918 




591 


1,981 


4,625 


1.550 


628 




75 


»73 








431 


963 


1,154 


1.506 


325 




521 


"288 




2,009 






1,809 


3.508 


1,274 


1,244 




395 


"48 




1,080 


20 


852 


2,126 


3.042 


3.216 


1,429 












4.345 


286 


1,545 


2,064 


1,560 


219 












2.287 


486 


1,230 


1,301 


593 


412 




205 






971 




890 


2.256 


2,451 


2,351 


1.044 




1.531 


"742 




19,201 


116 


14,017 


6.057 


40, 186 


23,750 


18.177 










1.253 


3.398 


726 


418 


2,530 


1,848 


689 




4,109 


131 


73 


14,516 


634 


11,427 


13,889 


43,256 


29,928 


24,446 


1,124 


337 






516 


43 


371 


1.235 


1,590 


376 


189 


1!6 


394 


"41 




383 




309 


896 


1,664 


355 


139 


57 


328 






896 


43 


507 


1,959 


2,166 


366 


306 


90 


96 






245 


45 


130 


614 


809 


247 


96 


43 


397 


b51 




196 


37 


362 


701 


1,787 


405 


207 


67 


375 






536 


55 


324 


1.334 


1,974 


502 


144 




252 






777 


210 


421 


1.885 


2,202 


317 


309 


133 


281 






623 


50 


284 


1,450 


1,823 


297 


167 


186 


284 






780 


106 


334 


1,760 


2,226 


335 


177 


106 








331 




245 


429 


1,146 


794 


676 


54 


234 


i>39 




572 




515 


381 


1,503 


796 


607 


110 








283 




241 


213 


875 


726 


517 


19 


iii 






873 




512 


1.032 


2,211 


1,343 


1.256 


72 






455 




407 




1,309 


1,572 


1.107 




48 






357 




278 




897 


926 


836 




37 






402 




369 




1,193 


1,307 


1.193 




141 






471 




446 




1,399 


1,402 


1.162 




60 






423 




402 




1 182 


1 324 


1 158 




46 






348 




363 




l!022 


1,'037 


'890 




69 
41 






363 




318 




1,218 


1,408 


1,132 








350 




296 




1.201 


1,488 


1.159 








434 




373 




1.154 


1,120 


995 




28 






477 




465 




1,385 


1,614 


1.353 








434 




413 




1,305 


1,524 


1,249 




166 
57 






651 




676 




1.537 


1,412 


1,456 








481 




411 




1.287 


1,358 


1,234 




156 






520 




462 




1,501 


1,659 


1,301 





306 Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE XXII — Continued — Enrollment by Subject, Including Duplicates: 



Local Unit 
— 

Name of High School 


Total 
Enroll- 
ment 


English 


Social 
Studies 


Science 


Mathe- 
matics 


Latin 


French 


Rat TTAii AT?Tr ( pr^nf iniiPfl^ 
















StrCniiDGrs Run Jr 


1, 869 


3,083 


1 , 818 


1 818 


1 783 




102 




1 708 


2 780 


1 673 


1 674 


1674 




111 




1 778 


2. 691 


1 729 


1 628 


1 329 


7 


401 




555 


583 


480 


'475 


' 307 


7 


182 




691 


1 044 


717 


621 


490 




82 


C3,lvGrt County Jr 


375 


' 750 


375 


375 


375 




137 




157 


314 


157 


157 


157 








1 987 


2 912 


1 976 


1 760 


1 382 


154 


528 


North Cs-roliDG Sr 


631 


776 


' 724 


'493 


'319 


93 


93 




347 


390 


327 


303 


156 


61 




Loclc6rni3,n Sr -Jr 


448 


643 


428 


365 


292 




119 




148 


302 


150 


151 


169 




63 


DGnton Jr 


166 


333 


100 


166 


167 




70 


PrpQfnn Tr 


70 


140 


70 


70 


70 




70 


T^pHpral^Hiircr .Tr 


125 


250 


125 


125 


156 




61 




52 


78 


52 


87 


53 




52 


C^. A RRni.T 


5 147 


6 233 


5, 450 


4, 525 


3 847 


42 


836 




'415 


'447 


'404 


'321 


'250 




84 




882 


887 


916 


645 


392 


'42 


278 


Alount Airy Sr 


323 


366 


335 


275 


196 




79 


T^Qnpv+nwn Sr - Tr 


416 


458 


419 


373 


329 




63 


Sykcsvillp Sr -Jr 


618 


1, 102 


840 


590 


483 




91 


T^nHprt \/fnfnn Sr -.Tr 


189 


189 


189 


174 


152 




15 


North Carroll Sr -Jr 


819 


843 


875 


675 


565 




136 




1 051 


1 342 


1 038 


1 038 


1,046 




90 


New AVindsor Jr 


131 


149 


131 


' 131 


' 131 






Elmer A. Wolfe Jr 


88 


88 


88 


88 


88 






Mount Airy Jr 


215 


362 


215 


215 


215 






Cecil 


4, 154 


4,346 


4, 218 


3, 469 


2,937 


141 


241 


F,lk-tnn Sr 


550 


582 


553 


357 


' 196 


31 


93 




511 


511 


460 


438 


354 




47 


r; W Carvpr Sr - Tr 


147 


147 


147 


147 


114 






North East Sr -Jr 


792 


794 


843 


712 


594 


62 




TJidinor Siin Sr -,Tr 


774 


844 


813 


705 


582 








578 


612 


595 


31 1 


445 


48 


50 


Elkton Jr 


802 


856 


807 


799 


652 




51 




3 368 


3 683 


3 372 


2,928 


2 580 


130 


374 


T.a Plata Sr -Ir 


953 


948 


981 


788 


665 


107 


62 


RpI Altnn Sr -Jr 


465 


544 


449 


431 


378 




49 




755 


971 


655 


581 


517 




121 


TiQplrp\7 Sr -.Tr 


774 


778 


866 


707 


588 


23 


142 




72 


93 


72 


72 


72 








74 


74 


74 


74 


74 








103 


103 


103 


103 


103 






Malcolm Jr 


172 


172 


172 


172 


183 






p. 


2 804 


3 054 


2 957 


2, 255 


2,083 


151 


396 




lOl 


811 


' 875 


414 


454 


95 


219 




538 


569 


563 


457 


371 


42 


75 




201 


210 


217 


189 


96 


14 






000 


898 


877 


776 


737 




102 






110 


oOU 


344 


350 






TTiirlnnlr Flpm TT ('Jih'S 


O'l 


1 10 


55 


55 


55 






Vipnna TT ('7iV\\ 


20 


40 


20 


20 


20 






Frederick 


7,048 


7,626 


6,765 


6,055 


5,061 


421 


883 




1 t;no 


1 719 
I , / IZ 


1 489 


1 184 


560 


102 


335 




78R 
/ oD 


806 


' 757 


' 750 


573 


56 






994 


204 


141 


203 


216 




47 




693 


744 


672 


583 


509 


24 


69 


Thiirmnnt Sr -Tr 


718 


752 


625 


635 


539 


46 


74 


Brunswick Sr.-Jr 


570 


604 


566 


516 


361 




87 




690 


702 


682 


576 


500 




108 


Elm Street Jr 


495 


521 


479 


408 


479 


ioi 


67 




1,370 


1,581 


1,354 


1,200 


1,324 


92 


96 


Garrett 


2,058 


2,511 


2,131 


1,722 


1,586 




242 


Northern Garrett Co. Sr.-Jr 


764 


796 


771 


623 


562 




103 


Southern Garrett Co. Sr.-Jr 


1,159 


1,445 


1,225 


964 


889 




139 




16 


32 


16 


16 


16 






Route 40 Jr 


59 


118 


59 


59 


59 






Kitzmiller Jr 


60 


120 


60 


60 


60 







Maryland State DEa'ARTMENT of Education 307 



Each Maryland Public High School: Fall of 1962 





Other 




Industrial Education 






Physical 




Art— 






Foreign 


Agri- 




Home 


• 

JD11S1D6SS 






Arts 




op&msu 


Lan- 


culture 






Eco- 


flducsition 




1 U 1 




c^Qucation 


guages 




Arts 


Vocational 


nomics 




Education 








97 






707 




618 




1,982 


1,928 


1,869 




74 






632 




575 




1,708 


1.990 


1,562 






10 


81 


439 




529 


936 


1,630 


1,124 


733 


51 




alO 




131 




86 


625 


455 


142 


18 


19 






si 


118 




258 


311 


591 


395 


149 


32 








190 




185 




375 


430 


409 














. . 




209 


157 


157 




70 




187 


679 




648 


1,194 


1.897 


2.031 


691 


156 






80 


206 




95 


595 


359 


324 


176 


103 


70 




52 


79 




83 


375 


277 


144 


87 


15 






55 


137 




157 


224 


448 


761 




38 








81 




68 




150 


185 


150 










89 




99 




416 


190 
















39 




70 


86 


ioi 










67 




58 




125 


205 


125 










20 




49 




52 


136 


52 








242 


1,816 


107 


1,706 


2,721 


6,065 


4,177 


833 








110 


115 




128 


339 


393 


309 












246 




100 


809 


560 


277 


'98 








39 


100 




133 


314 


293 


290 












152 




123 


272 


430 


505 


68 








26 


195 




197 


381 


602 


395 


264 










91 




85 


82 


224 


259 










67 


221 


49 


288 


524 


726 


542 


54 










440 


58 


446 




2,403 


1,028 


303 










148 




57 




131 


188 
















42 




88 


135 


46 










108 




107 




215 


249 






167 




88 


1,207 


111 


977 


2,245 


3,441 


1,299 


815 


341 








121 


111 


118 


674 


391 


145 


99 


220 






5i 


110 




104 


380 


412 


89 


72 


25 








71 




55 


48 


141 


45 






41 






218 




141 


423 


601 


228 


i39 


30 


126 




37 


253 




232 


413 


699 


320 


206 


37 








197 




151 


307 


384 


240 


125 


29 








237 




176 




813 


232 


174 








308 


570 


56 


841 


1,336 


2,390 


1,880 


537 








60 


100 




219 


562 


624 


307 


170 








97 


59 




79 


107 


365 


228 


39 








73 


199 


56 


175 


251 


525 


404 


187 










126 




206 


416 


396 


427 


125 


















105 


117 










30 






28 




74 


114 


ie 








48 






48 




103 


50 












86 




86 




198 


233 










105 


735 




601 


1,225 


2.475 


1,973 


1,109 


124 








166 




161 


557 


688 


361 


239 


40 






33 


187 




169 


368 


403 


425 




44 








102 




78 


122 


178 












72 


280 




193 


178 


782 


608 


446 


40 
















349 


349 


349 


















55 


210 


55 


















20 


20 


20 




97 




349 


2,038 




1.773 


3,078 


6.299 


4,628 


3,254 


616 


• • • 
97 




127 


393 




268 


1,328 


957 


355 


231 


160 




45 


170 




107 


343 


680 


624 


479 


15 








129 




92 




392 


174 


134 


43 






83 






249 


294 


544 


496 


364 


120 






43 


183 




192 


363 


722 


547 


381 


152 








94 




107 


444 


507 


372 


196 


95 






51 


111 




149 


liUO 


01 1 


O^o 


loU 


11 

01 








254 




154 




494 


597 


399 










462 




455 




1,392 


935 


890 








275 


627 


15 


616 


923 


1,601 


1,548 


378 


292 






177 


258 


15 


238 


344 


683 


687 




122 






98 


369 




378 


579 


783 


845 


243 


170 
















16 


16 


16 


















59 




59 


















60 




60 





308 Ninety-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE XXII — Continued — Enrollment by Subject, Including Duplicates: 



Local Unit 
— 

Name of High School 


Total 
Enroll- 
ment 


English 


Social 
Studies 


Science 


Mathe- 
matics 


Latin 


French 




7.920 


8,933 


7,979 


6,924 


6,350 


528 


1,332 


RpI Air Sr 


1 557 


1 761 


1 487 


1 228 


1 118 


169 


000 


EdgGwood Sr ~jr 


1,' 121 


1 ,' 230 


1 ,' 278 


1 000 


879 


91 


102 




1588 


1.912 


1 '. 622 


1 469 


1 262 


142 


479 


HftVTG dc Gr3,cG Consolidflrtcd Sr," 
















Jr 


311 


381 


293 


252 


217 




53 


Central Consolidated Sr -Jr 


419 


517 


397 


399 


375 




63 


Nnrth HarforH Sr -Tr 


1,084 


1,232 


1 044 


902 


892 


81 


62 


Havre de Grace Sr.-Jr 


'961 


'985 


L016 


829 


762 


45 


208 


Bel Air Jr 


879 


915 


842 


845 


845 








4,031 


5,076 


4 050 


3.724 


3 052 


162 


771 


Tifnwiirn r^mintv Sr 


1,014 


1 ,' 201 


l!082 


745 


528 


103 


210 


mpTipltr Sr - Tr 


' 700 


' 774 


' 719 


752 


419 


59 


160 




454 


609 


429 


406 


284 




26 




602 


823 


575 


575 


575 




135 


Flllipntt ritv Tr 


817 


1, 016 


803 


802 


802 




240 


Lisbon Jr 


192 


280 


190 


192 


192 






Plarlfcvillp Tr 


252 


373 


252 


252 


252 








1,453 


1,543 


1.371 


1,258 


1 , 127 


69 


228 


n } « i 


' 241 


241 


226 


211 


168 


26 


22 




631 


705 


624 


538 


499 


43 


115 




367 


364 


332 


315 


292 




64 


T?npk Hall Sr - Tr 


214 


233 


189 


194 


168 




27 




37 585 


46,039 






30 647 


2 154 


14, 079 


T?ir»ViQrfl ]V/lnn + (mmprv ftr 


1, 466 


1,515 


1, 116 


997 


631 


116 


399 




2 016 


2, 361 


1 606 


1 466 


1 368 


171 


742 




2I0I6 


2 ] 254 


1^544 


1 ,' 532 


1^264 


201 


742 


r^ai + lipr^KiircT Sr 


1^224 


l!341 


1 , 000 


' 848 


700 


130 


158 




2' 764 


3 165 


2' 124 


2,007 


1,657 


167 


854 




1 ' 975 


2 154 


1 410 


1 416 


1127 


103 


376 




1919 


2*254 


1 ,' 448 


l!d57 


\ \ 167 


132 


599 




'435 


'521 


'392 


' 247 


305 


23 


95 


1?ripL' T^orrQPP Sr - Tr 


119 


719 














1 284 


1 582 


1 iss 


799 


961 


103 


226 


Wilf Whitman Sr -Tr 


1! 418 


l!462 


966 


999 


1,196 


176 


728 




634 


'933 


588 


337 


'495 




248 


AlKorf TrincfAin Sr - Tr 


1,008 


1,038 


722 


749 


807 


98 


353 




1 102 


1 196 


801 


798 


913 


80 


465 


TinKprt Pparv Sr -Jr 


1, 464 


1^549 


1,238 


906 


1,267 


97 


414 


WpQ+ T^npUvillp Tr 


' 978 


l!o73 


833 


706 


978 


58 


456 




1 240 


1 528 


1 199 


929 


1 256 


30 


273 


WViUp Oolr Tr 


652 


985 


666 


330 


' 651 




341 




947 


1 043 


947 


472 


947 


3i 


454 




960 


l',302 


959 


457 


967 


33 


376 


North Bethesda Jr 


1,284 


1,620 


1,274 


580 


1,278 


81 


789 




753 


1 141 


731 


383 


752 




242 


Tli/-.rr.oc W P<;1p Tr 


782 


1 391 


782 


782 


782 




565 




972 


1,209 


972 


628 


972 


48 


381 




1 117 


1 492 


1, 134 


585 


1, 126 


30 


484 




1 186 


1' 796 


1 180 


1, 186 


1! 186 


63 


765 




1 234 


1 671 


1 229 


659 


1 230 


42 


620 




1 755 


2' 344 


1 761 


821 


1 ', 767 


61 


1,017 




1 542 


1 835 


1 554 


891 


1 544 


60 


'430 




1 '339 


1 565 


1291 


1, 118 


1)353 


20 


497 




35 188 


40 133 


34 796 


30 226 


27,568 


1,019 


3.503 




1951 


2 261 


1 588 


1*333 


l'074 


' 116 


454 




1 770 


2 006 


1^426 


l!057 


'712 


90 


282 




1 ' 787 


1991 


2 172 


1 \ 152 


739 


103 


366 




1 211 


1 255 


1 414 


1 016 


770 


92 


299 




398 


'449 


'421 


298 


187 




129 


/ W^r. TJill Qr 


1 493 


1 796 


1 406 


1 123 


890 


iio 


397 


Hii Vol Qr 


1 635 


1 908 


1 522 


1! 116 


848 


150 


274 




2^432 


21559 


2! 234 


1^547 


1,386 


319 


487 




677 


798 


612 


438 


194 


39 


82 






1 1 0A 


1 041 


935 


853 




106 




804 


844 


'761 


672 


636 






1,083 


1,209 


1,155 


965 


804 




163 


Fairmont Heights Sr.-Jr 


1,263 


1,162 


1,368 


877 


783 




Beltsville Jr 


753 


855 


722 


750 


744 




18 




1,051 


1,144 


1.051 


1,051 


1,055 




98 




1,010 


1,085 


982 


982 


982 




44 


Benjamin Stoddert Jr 


585 


1,038 


860 


860 


858 






948 


1,246 


948 


948 


948 




31 



Maryland State Department of Education 309 



Each Maryland Public High School: Fall of 1962 





Other 




Industrial Education 






Physical 




Art- 






Foreign 


Agri- 




Home 


Business 


and 




Arts 


Driver 






culture 






Eco- 


Education 


Health 


Alusic 




Education 






Arts 


Vocational 


nomics 




Education 




Crafts 




394 




179 


2,413 


103 


1,687 


3,470 


5,043 


4,787 


3,018 


508 


212 




71 


530 




254 


1, 162 


785 


518 


306 


199 


25 






298 


58 


187 


456 


707 


710 


241 


53 


157 






443 




297 


675 


805 


819 


609 


98 








93 




71 


161 


232 


192 


159 


35 








134 




111 


149 


331 


412 


211 


25 






108 


212 




140 


422 


649 


636 


144 










244 


45 


209 


445 


576 


507 


471 


98 








459 




418 




958 


993 


877 




179 




113 


1 458 


87 


1, 107 


1,516 


3,537 


2,424 


684 




60 




18 


287 




190 


806 


444 


255 


146 








95 


381 




159 


581 


482 


292 


110 










125 




187 


129 


405 


403 












261 




193 




867 


348 


i96 




119 






234 




222 




792 


511 


232 










111 




84 




295 


281 












59 




72 




252 


334 










80 


399 




434 


595 


1,503 


1, 195 


347 


159 








90 




81 


80 


227 


257 


86 


34 






56 


165 




157 


289 


476 


238 




66 






24 


89 




129 


129 


586 


467 


138 


29 








55 




67 


97 


214 


233 


123 


30 


2, 511 


535 


265 


9,889 
271 


1,705 


6,604 


10,247 


31,213 
998 


11,989 


6,993 


1,275 


133 


• • • 




591 


205 


1,270 


411 


110 


32 


381 


*104 




536 




243 


476 


1,654 


700 


394 


131 


324 


*108 




513 


90 


136 


584 


1,594 


615 


297 


72 


129 


• • • 




254 


122 


122 


742 


861 


393 


135 


50 


434 


"99 




780 


371 


379 


1,578 


1.359 


511 


481 


371 


209 


"49 




422 


369 


222 


1,379 


1, 184 


430 


174 


110 


245 


"61 




607 




219 


1, 107 


1,028 


507 


339 


60 








91 




73 


173 


366 


111 


98 


33 


• • • 






82 


30 


37 




117 


15 






102 






390 


96 


151 


437 


1,006 


482 


267 


98 


218 






322 




127 


405 


1.084 


391 


206 


98 


• • • 






177 




147 


215 


463 


206 


212 


64 


95 






287 




128 


506 


844 


186 


138 


40 


122 






327 




131 


362 


968 


240 


132 


100 


119 






367 




206 


444 


11246 


496 


280 


16 








292 




221 




1,037 


364 


220 










317 




321 




1, 201 


445 


249 










147 




134 




650 


232 


136 










226 




212 


119 


863 


719 


259 










244 




181 


98 


852 


331 


182 










239 




230 


149 


1,271 


365 


257 










223 




188 




861 


536 


318 










186 




206 




756 


268 


197 










394 




367 




938 


493 


280 










251 




263 




1,057 


343 


225 










318 




221 


203 


1, 173 


417 


380 










324 




293 




1, 183 


391 


210 










522 




494 




1,706 


514 


256 










457 




440 




1,541 


406 


246 










323 




307 




1,352 


471 


315 




3, 149 


239 


2/5 


11,912 


596 


10,698 


12,807 


30,522 


15.858 


12,275 


661 


395 


»143 




521 




304 


1,664 


1,331 


359 


222 


112 


184 


•65 




259 


365 


390 


1,460 


1,031 


298 


216 


121 


419 


'>19 




319 




205 


1,804 


865 


288 


293 


40 


211 






238 




188 


711 


844 


179 


120 




53 






72 




67 


376 


250 


72 


56 


48 


381 






303 




217 


1,353 


624 


416 


181 


4 


372 






306 




277 


1,354 


1,207 


231 


210 


74 


435 


^2 




468 




299 


1,738 


1,185 


532 


295 


85 


53 






140 




112 


889 


483 


127 


124 


20 


216 




55 


296 




306 


366 


927 


692 


338 


37 


22 




97 


241 




237 


265 


667 


294 


260 


20 


59 




123 


540 




481 


266 


2.602 


387 


603 


54 


130 






101 


23i 


246 


561 


870 


188 


221 


46 








381 




353 




754 


506 


335 










494 




445 




1.045 


1,053 


736 




36 






477 




389 




983 


445 


333 










386 




388 




842 


372 


328 




'i4 






448 




374 




931 


467 


295 





310 



Ninety-Se\'enth Annual Report 
TABLE XXII — Continued — Enrollment by Subject, Including Duplicates: 



Local Unit 
Name of High School 



Total 
Enroll- 
ment 



English 



Social 
Studies 



Science 



879 


953 


879 


880 


880 




38 


606 


698 


589 


591 


589 




14 


592 


793 


577 


577 


577 






918 


971 


918 


918 


918 




58 


800 


858 


797 


795 


793 




23 


691 


1,109 


691 


691 


690 




12 


838 


911 


837 


832 


835 




33 


862 


956 


862 


862 


863 






653 


779 


652 


653 


651 




22 


636 


762 


619 


619 


620 




23 


1,023 


1 , 261 


996 


996 


996 






989 


1,069 


893 


893 


896 






1,107 


1,298 


1,107 


1,107 


1,108 






1,067 


1,168 


1,067 


1,067 


1,067 






904 


966 


891 


891 


891 




24 


749 


855 


738 


734 


731 




26 


1 , 727 


1,912 


1,785 


1,410 


1 , 219 




205 


361 


374 


396 


255 


248 




43 


539 


687 


517 


451 


422 




89 


473 


473 


473 


392 


300 




41 


354 


378 


399 


312 


249 




32 


2, 689 


2, 757 


2 , 764 


2,315 


1,903 


18 


316 


549 


566 


619 


445 


329 


18 


123 


543 


567 


571 


447 


381 




94 


426 


447 


408 


373 


309 




57 


457 


462 


471 


384 


283 






308 


309 


307 


278 


223 




42 


406 


406 


388 


388 


378 






1,913 


2,005 


2, 124 


1 , 780 


1 , 542 




484 


414 


416 


489 


395 


277 




66 


123 


123 


139 


108 


101 




13 


236 


235 


236 


230 


226 




26 


461 


517 


513 


419 


350 




01/1 


106 


107 


164 


86 


90 




• • • 


548 


• 557 


558 


517 


473 




165 


25 


50 


25 


25 


25 






1,822 


2,275 


1,818 


1,654 


1,386 


74 


304 


960 


1,172 
681 


949 


853 


789 


74 


144 


493 


496 


475 


329 




56 


369 


422 


373 


326 


268 




104 


9,173 


10,778 


8,888 


8,242 


7,088 


666 


675 


1,798 


2,051 


2 , 024 


1 , 320 


1, 249 


176 


240 


303 


318 


322 


318 


187 




35 


753 


819 


838 


796 


490 


i44 


78 


1,994 


2,412 


1,656 


1,614 


1,253 


208 


260 


593 


828 


663 


553 


360 


60 


24 


537 


583 


549 


449 


354 


38 


20 


512 


672 


463 


437 


358 


40 


18 


167 


292 


125 


146 


125 






447 


701 


359 


413 


413 










687 


826 


1 000 






818 


818 


683 


858 


'787 






528 


561 


519 


512 


512 






4,543 


5,827 


4,643 


4,812 


3,507 


328 


827 


1,238 


1,379 


1,312 


832 


588 


91 


108 


298 


422 


325 


248 


221 




101 


272 


334 


305 


228 


200 




85 


1,129 


1,911 


1,164 


1,929 


909 


56 


242 


1,142 


1,251 


1,072 


1,111 


1,127 


155 


129 


464 


530 


465 


464 


462 


26 


162 


2,405 


2,915 


2,385 


2,137 


1,875 


2 


776 


401 


484 


400 


355 


329 


2 


150 


412 


494 


394 


356 


318 




184 


724 


722 


724 


622 


538 




211 


868 


1,215 


867 


804 


690 




231 



Mathe- 
matics 



Latin 



Prince George's — (contmued) 

Roger B. Taney Jr 

Surra ttsville Jr 

Laurel Jr 

Oxon Hill Jr 

John Hanson Jr 

Kent Jr 

Hyattsville Jr 

Mt. Rainier Jr 

Rollingcrest Jr 

Nicholas Orem Jr 

Maryland Park Jr 

Mary M. Bethune Jr 

Glenridge Jr 

Charles Carroll Jr 

Greenbelt Jr 

Buck Lodge Jr 

Queen Anne's 

Sudlersville Sr.-Jr 

Centreville Sr.-Jr 

Kennard Sr.-Jr 

Stevensville Sr.-Jr 

St. Mary's 

Great Mills Sr 

Leonardtovvn Sr.-Jr 

Banneker Sr.-Jr 

Margaret Brent Sr.-Jr 

George Washington Carver Sr.-Jr 
Esperanza Jr 

Somerset 

Washington Sr.-Jr 

Marion Sr.-Jr 

Woodson Sr.-Jr 

Crisfield Sr.-Jr 

Deal Island Sr.-Jr 

Somerset Sr.-Jr 

Ewell Jr 

Talbot 

Easton Sr.-Jr 

Moton Sr.-Jr 

St. Michaels Sr.-Jr 

Washington 

South Hagerstown Sr 

Hancock Sr 

Boonsboro Sr 

North Hagerstown Sr 

Williamsport Sr.-Jr 

Clear Spring Sr.-Jr 

Smithsburg Sr.-Jr 

Hancock Int.-Jr 

Boonsboro Jr 

South Potomac Jr 

North Potomac Jr 

Washington Jr 

Wicomico 

Wicomico Sr 

Mardela Sr.-Jr 

Pittsville Sr.-Jr 

Salisbury Sr.-Jr 

Wicomico Jr 

James M. Bennett Jr 

Worcester 

Pocomoke Sr.-Jr 

Snow Hill Sr.-Jr 

Stephen Decatur Sr.-Jr 

Worcester Sr.-Jr 



Includes the following number taking German: Allegany: Allegany Sr.-Jr.— 29; Anne Arundel: Andover Sr.-Jr.— 89, Brooklyn Park 
Sr.-Jr.— 51; Baltimore Citv: City College— 288, Eastern— 95, Edmondson— 103, Forest Park— 158, Frederick Douglass— 48, Patterson 
—30, Polytechnic— 346, Western— 73; Junior Highs— 742; Baltimore: Milford Mill Sr.- 41; Calvert: Calvert Sr.— 10; Montgomery: 
Bethesda-Chevy Chase Sr.- 108, Albert Einstein Sr.-Jr.— 53, Walter Johnson Sr.— 104, Montgomery Blair Sr.— 99, Northwood Sr.— 
61. Wheaton Sr.— 49, Walt Whitman Sr.-Jr.— 61; Prince George's: Bladensburg Sr.— 65, High Point Sr.— 143; Washmgton: North 
Hagerstown Sr.— 29, South Hagerstown Sr.— 30. 



Maryland State Department of Education 311 



Each Maryland Public High School: Fall of 1962 





Other 




Industrial Education 






Physical 
and 




Art — 






Foreign 


Agri- 




Home 


Busmess 




Arts 


• 

Driver 


bpanish 


Lan- 


culture 






Eco- 


Education 


Health 


Music 


and 


Education 


guages 




Arts 


Vocational 


nomics 




Lducation 




Crafts 










201 




180 




878 


797 


399 




"'6 






162 




139 




586 


588 


267 










325 




252 




577 


581 


491 




22 






378 




396 




854 


475 


333 




16 






395 




369 




782 


456 


323 










340 




337 




688 


305 


352 










416 




392 




893 


533 


311 




45 






,410 




396 




801 


521 


381 










369 




279 




653 


439 


516 










303 




305 




637 


433 


398 










439 




388 




1 015 


601 


378 










466 




427 




'938 


916 


817 




57 






377 




353 




1.105 


650 


645 




23 






487 




441 




1,040 


625 


601 










474 




431 




903 


473 


359 










OIL 




335 




731 


559 


638 








176 


347 




494 


698 


1.524 


934 


165 


165 






54 






89 


233 


327 


236 


68 


37 






46 


i23 




187 


212 


442 


363 


97 


42 






76 


142 




136 


139 


428 


230 




33 








82 




82 


114 


327 


105 




53 


164 




90 


997 




821 


1,248 


2,919 


1,923 


1,501 


213 


103 






88 




68 


436 


647 


153 


187 


18 








158 




150 


282 


296 


384 


205 


30 






'4i 


167 




155 


127 


415 


344 


220 


42 






49 


159 




131 


291 


718 


444 


308 


43 








144 




86 


112 


333 


150 


175 


80 








001 




231 




510 


448 


406 








124 


384 




553 


871 


1,758 


1,120 


26 








58 






104 


219 


384 


328 


















70 


123 


23 


26 










ios 




i22 


42 


227 


102 












161 




194 


335 


360 


266 


















80 


105 












66 


iis 




133 


125 


534 


40 i 




















25 












146 


518 




454 


785 


1,385 


1,028 




137 






74 


282 




214 


480 


700 


518 




97 






72 


121 




138 


87 


324 


189 




40 








lis 




102 


218 


361 


321 






1.097 


59 


357 


3,528 


219 


2,899 


2,897 


12,802 


5,021 


3.252 


308 


187 


»30 


83 


497 


104 


347 


1 00 


954 


OOV 


1 07 










151 




173 


217 


463 


211 




20 






iii 


78 




162 


403 


351 


240 


102 


40 


297 






862 


lis 


481 


754 


4,628 


473 


195 


48 


185 




73 


213 




170 


322 


631 


312 


228 


82 


32 






1 15 




159 


282 


584 


297 


211 


24 


106 




90 


195 




107 


154 


330 


358 




22 


69 






103 




64 




265 


181 






35 






249 




1 07 




•100 




A if 

44/ 




35 






351 




374 




723 


731 


723 




31 






426 




424 




2.456 


876 


818 




120 






288 




241 




981 


502 


331 




334 




173 


1.482 


30 


1,266 


2,122 


3,353 


2.579 


2.224 


679 


276 




64 


258 


30 


125 


1,349 


260 


288 


139 


569 






33 


101 




102 


219 


356 


182 


165 










108 




86 


155 


269 


172 


204 








64 


326 




329 


399 


1,079 


692 


655 


lio 






12 


466 




410 




949 


747 


662 










223 




214 




440 


498 


399 








147 


730 




608 


941 


1,737 


1,412 


731 


99 








183 




102 


158 


307 


269 


127 


21 






33 


116 




127 


196 


320 


271 


173 


21 






59 


250 




205 


411 


501 


297 


108 


32 






55 


181 




174 


176 


609 


575 


323 


25 



Includes the following number taking Russian: Baltimore: Ridgely Jr.-Dulaney Sr.— 39, Towson Sr.— 51; Prince George's: 
Northwestern Sr.— 12. Suitland Sr.— 19. 



1 



I 



Index 



313 



INDEX 



A 

Academic course, each high school, 296-303 

Accreditation and certification, division of, 
100-106 

Administration 

Cost per pupil, 218 
Expenditures, 285, 291 
Per cent for, 212-215, 214-215 
Superintendents, 2, 7-24, 270 

Administration and finance, division of, 
107-109 

Adult education, 239-245, 281, 286 
Agriculture 

Adult education, 238, 239-240, 244-245 

Enrollment, 149, 160 

Each high school, 304-311 

Federal aid, 239-241, 246 

Schools offering, 174, 304-311 

State supervision, 3 

Teachers, 174 
Aid from State and/or Federal funds (see 

State aid and Federal aid) 
Aid per classroom, 259, 281 
Aid per pupil, 259, 281 
Appropriations 

Local, 209-211, 233, 283 

State, 209-211, 259, 281 

Federal, 209-211, 282 
Area Redevelopment Act, 238, 282 
Art 

Enrollment, 149, 172 

Each high school, 304-311 

Schools offering, 174, 304-311 

Teachers, 174 
Assessable basis, 234-236 
Attendance 

Average daily, 269 

Per cent of, 269 

Teachers at summer school and work- 
shops, 183 
Workers (see Pupil personnel) 



B 

Bands, orchestras, chorus, 170-171 

Belonging, average number, 269 
Per teacher, 175 

Births, resident, 128 

Board of Education, State, 2 

Bonded indebtedness, 230, 231 

Books and instructional materials, 286-287 

Boys and girls 

Each high school, 296-303 
Graduates, high school, 142-148 
Nonpromotions in first grade, 141 
Number of different pupils, 268 

Budget 

Appropriations, State Department of 
Education, 259 

Local appropriations, 233 

State teachers colleges, 259, 266 
Buildings (see Capital outlay) 
Business education 

Adult, 243 

Enrollment, 149, 160-167, 243 
Each high school, 304-311 
Schools offering, 174, 304-311 
Teachers, 174 



c 

Capital outlay, school, 209, 228, 233, 284 
By site, building, equipment, 294 
Local tax rates, 232 



C — (Continued) 

Certificate status, teachers, 188-190 
Chorus, bands, orchestras, 170-171 
Certification and accreditation, division of, 
100-106 

Civil Defense adult education, 238. 282 

Classes 

Adult education, 242-245 
Special for handicapped, 129-137 

Clerks, 270-271 

Colleges 

Community and junior college enroll- 
ments, 255 
Graduates qualifying for teaching cer- 
tificates, 182 
High school graduates 

of 1962 entering, 143-148 
State teachers, 7, 145, 147, 247-254, 
259, 261-266 
Commercial (see Business education) 
Community colleges, 212-213, 255, 259, 281, 

283, 285, 293 
Community services, 212-213, 285, 292 
Consolidation 

Decrease in one-teacher schools, 176 
Transportation of pupils, 222-223, 290 
Construction accounts. State teachers col- 
leges, 262-265 
Contents, table of, 25 

Contracted services, expenditures, 286-292 
Cost per pupil, 216-217 

By function, 218 

Transported, 222 
Costs (see Expenditures) 
County superintendents, directors, super- 
visors, 7-24 
Courses in individual high schools, 296-303 
Crippled children, services for, 129-135, 137 
Current expenses 

Amount and per cent by source, 
209-211 

Cost per pupil, 216-218 

Local tax rates, 232 

Per cent distribution by function, 
212-215 



D 

Dates, opening and closing of schools, 117 

Days in session, 117 

Debt service, 209, 230-233, 284, 295 

Local tax rates, 232 
Departments of education. State and local, 
2-24 

Disbursements (see Expenditures) 
Distributive education, 239-240. 244, 246 
Driver education and training, high school 

Enrollment, 149, 173 

Each high school, 304-311 

Schools offering, 174 

State aid, 281 

Teachers, 174 



E 

Elementary schools 

Disbursements for instruction, 287 

Instructional personnel, 271 

Number of, 267 
Emergency certificates, 188-190 
Employment of high school graduates, 
143-148 



314 



Index 



E — (Continued) 

English, high school 

Enrollment, 149, 150-151 

Each high school, 304-311 

Schools offering, 174, 304-311 

Teachers, 174 
Enrollment 

Adult, 242-244 

Campus schools, State teachers col- 
leges, 124 
Elementary, 118-127, 268, 272-279 
Grade or year, 120, 122-127 
Handicapped children, 129-137 
High school 

Course, each school, 296-303 
Grade, 120, 122-127 

Each school, 296-303 
Subjects, 149-173 

Each school, 304-311 
Nonpublic, private and parochial, 

118-119, 125-127 
Public, 118-121, 123, 268 
State teachers college, 249-252 
Subject, 149-173 

Each school, 296-303 
Summary, 118-119, 122 
Equalization fund, 210-211, 259, 281 
Equivalence high school, 237 
Evening schools and courses 
Enrollment, 242-244 
Expenditures, 239-241, 286 
Expenditures 

(see also Administration, Capital out- 
lay. Community colleges. Community 
services. Debt service. Fixed charges, 
Food services. Health services. Instruc- 
tion, Maintenance, Operation, Pupil 
personnel. Student body activities, 
Transportation) 
Adult education, 239-241, 286 
Contracted services, 286-292 
Libraries, local, 258 
Library books, 286-287 
Other charges, 286-292 
Rehabilitation, 257, 260-261 
Salaries, 286-292 

All schools, 286-287 
Elementary, 287 
High, 287 

Vocational, 239-241, 246 
State teachers colleges, 253-254, 

259, 261, 262-265, 266 
Supplies and materials, 286-292 
Textbooks, 286-287 
Total, by major functions, 259, 

284-285 

Vocational, Federal, 239-241, 246 
Experience of teachers, 192-203 



F 

Failures (see Nonpromotions) 
Fall enrollment, 118, 120-127 
Federal aid 

Aid to schools, 209-211, 282 
Vocational education, 238-241, 246 

Administration and supervision, 
239-240 

Salaries of teachers, 239-240, 246 
Fees in State teachers colleges, 253-254, 
266 

Financial statements 

State public schools, 259, 281-295 
State teachers colleges, 253-254, 259, 
262-265, 266 
First grade nonpromotions, 141 
Fixed charges, 212-213, 214-215, 218, 285, 
291 

Follow-up of graduates, 143-148 



F — (Continued) 

Food services, 212-213, 285, 292 
E'rench, high school 

Enrollment, 149, 158 

Each high school, 304-311 

Schools offering, 174, 304-311 

Teachers, 174 



G 

German, 159 (see French for other refer- 

GnCGS ) 

Grade enrollment, 120, 122-127 
Graduates 

High school, 142-148 

Entering State teachers colleges, 
147 

From each school, 296-303 
Occupations of, 143-148 
State teachers college, 247-248 
Guidance, teachers of, 174, 270-271 



H 

Handicapped children 

Expenditures, 130, 137, 259 
Home and hospital instruction, 129- 
130, 134 

Opportunities for education of, 129- 
137 

Preschool, 137 

Receipts from State for, 130, 137, 259, 
281 

Health education, (see Physical and health 
education) 

Health services, 212-213, 214-215, 218, 285, 
288 

Hearing and speech therapy, 136 
High school equivalence, 237 
High schools 

Disbursements for instruction, 287 

Individual, 296-303, 304-311 

Instructional personnel, 271 
Home economics 

Adult, 239-240, 242-245 

Enrollment, 149, 161 

Each high school, 304-311 

Federal aid, 239-241, 246 

Schools offering, 174, 304-311 

Teachers, 174 
Home and hospital instruction of pupils, 
129-130, 134 



I 

Incentive fund, school buildings, 259, 281 
Industrial education (see Trades and in- 
dustries) 
Instruction 

Cost per pupil, 218 
Division of, 74-89 
Expenditures, 

Contracted services, 286-287 
Salaries, 286-287 
Supplies and materials, 286-287 
State teachers colleges, 254 
Total, 284 
Per cent of current expenses, 212-213, 
214-215 

Inventories, State teachers colleges, 254 



J 

Junior colleges, 255, 259, 281, 293 



Index 



315 



K 

Kindergartens 

Enrollment, public and nonpublic, 120, 

122-127 
Nonpublic, 272-279 



L 

Languages (see English, French, etc.) 

Latin (see French) 

Legislation, 27-34 

Length of school session, 117 

Letter of transmittal, 26 

Levies, local, 233 

Librarians, local, 7, 270-271 

Libraries, local 

Circulation and number of volumes. 
258 

Income and expenditures, 258, 259 

State aided, 7 
Library books, expenditures, 286, 287 
Librarj' extension, division of, 90-94 
Librarj' service act, 238 
Loans to students, college, 261 
Local appropriations, 209-211, 233, 283 
Lunch program, school, 224-227, 259, 282 

M 

Maintenance 

Cost per pupil, 218 

Expenditures, 285, 289 

Per cent of current expenses, 212-213, 

214-215 
Personnel, 270 
Manpower Development Training Act, 238, 
282 

Materials and supplies, expenditures, 286- 
292 

Mathematics, high school 

Enrollment, 149, 156-157 

Each high school, 304-311 
Schools offering, 174, 304-311 
Teachers, 174 
Medical examinations, bus drivers, 281 
Mentallv handicapped children, 129-135, 
137 

Milk program, special, 225, 282 
Minimum program, State, 208 
Minutes, State Board, 35-73 
Music, high school 

Enrollment, 149, 170-171 

Each high school, 304-311 

Orchestras, bands, glee clubs, 170-171 

Schools offering, 174, 304-311 

Teachers, 174 



N 

National Defense Education Act, 238, 259, 
282 

Night schools (see Evening schools. Adult 

education) 
Nonpromotions 

Elementary, 140-141 
First grade, 141 
High school, 139 
Nonpublic schools, 118, 119, 125-127. 272- 
279 

Number belonging, average, 269 

Per teacher, 175 
Number of different pupils, 119, 268 
Number of schools 

Nonpublic, 118, 119, 272-279 
One teacher. 176, 267 
Public, 118, 119, 267 

Elemenlarv, 118, 119, 176, 180- 

181, 267 
High, 118, 119, 180-181, 267 



o 

Occupations of high school graduates, 143- 
148 

Office and clerical staff, 270, 271 

One-teacher schools 

Decrease in, 176 

Number belonging in, 176 

Number of, 176, 267 
Operation 

Cost per pupil, 218 

Expenditures, 285, 289 

Per cent of current expenses, 212-213, 
214-215 

Personnel, 270 
Orchestras, bands, chorus, 170-171 
Other charges, expenditures, 286-292 

P 

Parochial and private schools (see Non- 
public schools) 

Part-payment of salaries, 259, 281 

Payments to adjoining units, 284 

Pensions (see Retirement system for 
teachers) 

Phvsical and health education, high school 

Enrollment, 149, 168-169 

Each high school, 304-311 

Schools offering, 174, 304-311 

Teachers, 174 
Physical examination, bus drivers, 281 
Physically handicapped children, 129-137 
Preparation, teachers, 184-187 
Preschool handicapped, 137 
Presidents of State teachers colleges, 7 
Principals and vice-principals, 270-271 
Private and parochial schools, 118-119, 125- 

127, 272-279 
Professional and clerical staffs, county, 

270-271 
Property 

Assessed valuation, 234-236 

School, 229 
Provisional certificates, 188-190 
Psychology (see Social studies) 
Pupil personnel 

Cost per pupil, 218 

Local staffs, 7-24 

Number of positions, 271 

Per cent of current expenses. 212-213, 
214-215 

Salaries. 288 

Total expenditures, 285 
Pupils 

Campus schools, State teachers col- 
leges, 124 
Nonpublic, 118-119, 125-127, 272-279 
One-teacher schools, 176 
Per teacher, 175 
Public school 

Enrollment, 118-123, 268 

Number attending, 269 

Number belonging. 269 

Per cent of attendance, 269 
Transported, 222 

R 

Receipts from 

All sources, 209-211. 283 

Federal. 209-211, 282 

Adult education, 241 
Libraries. 238, 258 
Teachers salaries, 239-241 
Vocational education, 238-241 

Local. 209-211. 233, 283 

State 

Adult education, 241 
Libraries. 258. 259 
Schools, 209-211, 281 
Rehabilitation, vocational, 4-6, 113-116. 
256-257, 259, 260-261 



316 



Index 



R — (Continued) 

Repair, utility men, janitors (see Operation 

personnel) 
Revenue and nonrevenue receipts, 283 
Research and development, division of, 110- 

112 

Resident births, 128 
Resignations, teachers, 204-206 
Retarded children, programs for, 129-137 
Retirement systems for teachers, 6-7, 259. 
281 

Russian, 158 (see French for other refer- 
ences) 



s 

Salaries 

Administration, 291 

Contracted services, 290 

Health services, 288 

Instruction, 286-287 

Maintenance and operation, 289 

Pupil personnel, 288 

Teachers, average, 219-221 

Vocational, 239-241 
School lunch, 212-213, 224-227. 282, 292 
School milk, 212-213, 225, 282 
Schools, 

Number of, 118-119, 176, 180-181, 267, 
272-279 
Science, high school 

Enrollment, 149, 154-155 

Each high school, 304-311 
Schools offering, 174, 304-311 
Teachers, 174 
Secretaries and clerks, 270-271 
Session, length of, 117 
Size of 

Schools 

Each high school, 296-303 
Elementary, 180-181 
High, 180-181 
Teaching staff, 118-119, 180-181, 270 
Social security, teachers, 281 
Social studies, high school 

Enrollment, 149, 152-153 

Each high school, 304-311 
Schools offering, 174, 304-311 
Teachers, 174 
Source of funds, current expenses, 209 
Spanish, 159 (see French for other refer- 
ences) 

Special classes for handicapped, 129-133. 
137 

Special milk program, 225, 259, 282 
Speech and hearing therapy, 136 
State 

Aid to schools, 209-211 

Minimum program, 208 
Showing various funds, 259, 28] 

Board of Education, 2 

Excerpts from minutes of, 35-73 

Department of Education, 2-6, 259, 
260-261 

Public school budget, 259, 260-261 
Teachers colleges, 7, 145, 147, 247-254, 

259, 261-266 
Teachers' retirement system, 6-7, 259 
Student body activities, 212, 285, 292 
Subjects studied in high schools, 149-173 

Each high school, 304-311 
Summer school attendance, county teachers, 
183 

Superintendents, 2, 7-24, 270-271 
Supervisors 

Local school systems, 7-24 

Names of, 2-24 

Number of, 270-271 

State, 2-6 

Supplies and materials, expenditures, 286- 
293 



T 

Table of contents, 25 
Taxable basis, 234-236 

Tax dollar, distribution of school, 212-213 

Tax rates, local, 232 

Teacher(s) 

Average salarj', 219-221 

Certification, 100-106, 182, 188-190 

Colleges, 7, 145, 147, 247-254, 259, 
261-266 

Experience, 192-203 

New, 186-187, 190, 191, 198-203, 207 

Number of 
Public 

Elementary and high, 118- 
119, 177-179, 270-271 

For each high school subject, 
174 

In each high school, 296-303 
Nonpublic, 118-119, 272-279 
Of handicapped children, 131-133, 136 
Preparation, 184-187 
Pupils per, 175 
Resignations, 204-206 
Salaries, average, 219-221 
Social security, 281 

Summary, elementary and high, public 

and nonpublic, 118-119 
Summer school and workshops, county 

teachers, 183 
Turnover of, 191. 204-207 
Teachers' retirement system, 0-7, 259, 281 
Textbooks, expenditures, 286-287 
Therapy program, hearing and speech, 136 
Trades and industries (Industrial educa- 

**°Adult, 239-240, 241-245 
Enrollment, 149, 162-165 

Each high school, 304-311 
Federal aid, 238-240, 246 
Schools offering, 174, 304-311 
Teachers, 174 
Transportation of pupils 

Cost, total and per pupil, 218, 222, 
285, 290 

Number and per cent transported, 222 

Number of schools to which transpor- 
tation was provided, 223 

Number vehicles, 223 

Per cent of current expenses, 212-213. 
214-215 

Personnel, 270 
Turnover in teaching staff, 191, 204-207 



V 

Value of 

Assessable property, 234-236 
School property, 229 
Vocational education 
Division of, 95-99 
Enrollment 

Adult education, 244 
Day schools, 149. 162-165 
Federal aid, 238-241, 246, 259, 282 
Vocational rehabilitation, 4-6, 113-116, 256 
257, 259, 260-261 

w 

Wealth back of each pupil belonging, 236 

Wealth per capita, 236 

Withdrawals 

Pupils, 138 

Teachers, 204-206 
Workshops, county teachers, 183 



Y 

Year, length of school, 117 



I 



DO NOT CIRCULATE 



1430 05bbl5S0 2